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DIVIDED BY MEMORIES? BELIEFS ABOUT THE PAST, ETHNIC BOUNDARIES, AND TRUST IN NORTHERN IRAQ

DIVIDED BY MEMORIES? BELIEFS ABOUT THE PAST, ETHNIC BOUNDARIES, AND TRUST IN NORTHERN IRAQ This paper examines beliefs about the past across ethnic groups in conflict ridden Northern Iraq, and the extent to which such beliefs are associated with interethnic trust and political trust. Using individual-level survey data (N=1,440) collected in 2010 and 2011 in the cities of Erbil and Kirkuk, our quantitative analyses show that beliefs about the past are strongly structured by ethnicity, but that the ethnic composition of friendship networks is an important moderating factor. We tended to find stronger group-specific uniformities in beliefs in the more violent and polarized Kirkuk, where group boundaries are more pronounced both in a cultural and a structural sense. Our results also indicate that beliefs about the past play a significant role in interethnic trust as beliefs about the past connected to particular ethnic groups are often associated with trust in these groups. Beliefs about the past are also shown to be associated with trust in political institutions. Keywords: belief; past; ethnic boundary; trust; Northern Iraq http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geopolitics, History, and International Relations Addleton Academic Publishers

DIVIDED BY MEMORIES? BELIEFS ABOUT THE PAST, ETHNIC BOUNDARIES, AND TRUST IN NORTHERN IRAQ

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Publisher
Addleton Academic Publishers
Copyright
© 2009 Addleton Academic Publishers
ISSN
1948-9145
eISSN
2374-4383
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper examines beliefs about the past across ethnic groups in conflict ridden Northern Iraq, and the extent to which such beliefs are associated with interethnic trust and political trust. Using individual-level survey data (N=1,440) collected in 2010 and 2011 in the cities of Erbil and Kirkuk, our quantitative analyses show that beliefs about the past are strongly structured by ethnicity, but that the ethnic composition of friendship networks is an important moderating factor. We tended to find stronger group-specific uniformities in beliefs in the more violent and polarized Kirkuk, where group boundaries are more pronounced both in a cultural and a structural sense. Our results also indicate that beliefs about the past play a significant role in interethnic trust as beliefs about the past connected to particular ethnic groups are often associated with trust in these groups. Beliefs about the past are also shown to be associated with trust in political institutions. Keywords: belief; past; ethnic boundary; trust; Northern Iraq

Journal

Geopolitics, History, and International RelationsAddleton Academic Publishers

Published: Jan 1, 2017

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