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A Prospective Analysis of Body Size during Childhood, Adolescence, and Adulthood and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

A Prospective Analysis of Body Size during Childhood, Adolescence, and Adulthood and Risk of... The etiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is poorly understood. Obesity is associated with inflammation, a cytokine milieu conducive to lymphocyte proliferation, and has been associated with NHL risk in some epidemiologic studies. To prospectively examine NHL risk in relation to adult and earlier life obesity, we documented 635 incident NHL diagnoses among 46,390 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and 1,254 diagnoses among 116,794 women in the Nurses' Health Study over 22 to 32 years of follow-up. Using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated cohort-specific incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for risk of NHL and major histologic subtypes associated with cumulative average middle and young adult (ages, 18–21 years) body mass index (BMI) and adolescent and childhood somatotype. NHL risk was modestly increased in men (but not women) with a cumulative average middle adult BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 (vs. 15–22.9 kg/m 2 ; RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.92–1.77; P trend = 0.05). In meta-analyses across cohorts, higher young adult BMI was associated with increased risk of all NHL (pooled RR per 5 kg/m 2 , 1.19; 95% CI, 1.05–1.37), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and follicular lymphoma (all P trend ≤ 0.02). Adolescent somatotype was also positively associated with all NHL, DLBCL, and follicular lymphoma in pooled analyses (all P trend ≤ 0.03), whereas childhood somatotype was positively associated with NHL overall among women only ( P trend < 0.01). These findings in two large prospective cohorts provide novel evidence that larger body size in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood predicts increased risk of NHL, and particularly of DLBCL and follicular lymphoma. Cancer Prev Res; 6(8); 864–73. ©2013 AACR . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Prevention Research American Association of Cancer Research

A Prospective Analysis of Body Size during Childhood, Adolescence, and Adulthood and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

A Prospective Analysis of Body Size during Childhood, Adolescence, and Adulthood and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Cancer Prevention Research , Volume 6 (8): 864 – Aug 1, 2013

Abstract

The etiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is poorly understood. Obesity is associated with inflammation, a cytokine milieu conducive to lymphocyte proliferation, and has been associated with NHL risk in some epidemiologic studies. To prospectively examine NHL risk in relation to adult and earlier life obesity, we documented 635 incident NHL diagnoses among 46,390 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and 1,254 diagnoses among 116,794 women in the Nurses' Health Study over 22 to 32 years of follow-up. Using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated cohort-specific incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for risk of NHL and major histologic subtypes associated with cumulative average middle and young adult (ages, 18–21 years) body mass index (BMI) and adolescent and childhood somatotype. NHL risk was modestly increased in men (but not women) with a cumulative average middle adult BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 (vs. 15–22.9 kg/m 2 ; RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.92–1.77; P trend = 0.05). In meta-analyses across cohorts, higher young adult BMI was associated with increased risk of all NHL (pooled RR per 5 kg/m 2 , 1.19; 95% CI, 1.05–1.37), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and follicular lymphoma (all P trend ≤ 0.02). Adolescent somatotype was also positively associated with all NHL, DLBCL, and follicular lymphoma in pooled analyses (all P trend ≤ 0.03), whereas childhood somatotype was positively associated with NHL overall among women only ( P trend < 0.01). These findings in two large prospective cohorts provide novel evidence that larger body size in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood predicts increased risk of NHL, and particularly of DLBCL and follicular lymphoma. Cancer Prev Res; 6(8); 864–73. ©2013 AACR .

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References (51)

Publisher
American Association of Cancer Research
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 American Association for Cancer Research
ISSN
1940-6207
eISSN
1940-6215
DOI
10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-13-0132
pmid
23803416
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The etiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is poorly understood. Obesity is associated with inflammation, a cytokine milieu conducive to lymphocyte proliferation, and has been associated with NHL risk in some epidemiologic studies. To prospectively examine NHL risk in relation to adult and earlier life obesity, we documented 635 incident NHL diagnoses among 46,390 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and 1,254 diagnoses among 116,794 women in the Nurses' Health Study over 22 to 32 years of follow-up. Using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated cohort-specific incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for risk of NHL and major histologic subtypes associated with cumulative average middle and young adult (ages, 18–21 years) body mass index (BMI) and adolescent and childhood somatotype. NHL risk was modestly increased in men (but not women) with a cumulative average middle adult BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 (vs. 15–22.9 kg/m 2 ; RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.92–1.77; P trend = 0.05). In meta-analyses across cohorts, higher young adult BMI was associated with increased risk of all NHL (pooled RR per 5 kg/m 2 , 1.19; 95% CI, 1.05–1.37), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and follicular lymphoma (all P trend ≤ 0.02). Adolescent somatotype was also positively associated with all NHL, DLBCL, and follicular lymphoma in pooled analyses (all P trend ≤ 0.03), whereas childhood somatotype was positively associated with NHL overall among women only ( P trend < 0.01). These findings in two large prospective cohorts provide novel evidence that larger body size in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood predicts increased risk of NHL, and particularly of DLBCL and follicular lymphoma. Cancer Prev Res; 6(8); 864–73. ©2013 AACR .

Journal

Cancer Prevention ResearchAmerican Association of Cancer Research

Published: Aug 1, 2013

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