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Interleukin 2 Production in Vitro by Peripheral Lymphocytes in Response to Human Papillomavirus-derived Peptides: Correlation with Cervical Pathology

Interleukin 2 Production in Vitro by Peripheral Lymphocytes in Response to Human... Human papillomavirus (HPV) is believed to be the major cause of cervical cancer. To investigate whether a cellular immune response, especially a T helper type 1 response, is related to the natural defense against HPV-related cervical lesions, the interleukin 2 response of peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro to overlapping peptides from HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins was compared with the degree of cervical cytological abnormality among 140 women in a cross-sectional study. We compared 66 women diagnosed with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 21 with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and 28 with invasive cervical cancer with 25 women who were cytologically normal but previously HPV-16 DNA positive. The fraction showing strong interleukin 2 production against HPV-16 peptides was greatest among cytologically normal women (35%) and declined with increasing disease severity LSIL (20%), HSIL (17%), and cancer patients (7%); X 2 test P for the trend = 0.02, whereas the responses against a recall influenza antigen were not significantly different among groups. Our finding suggests that a T helper lymphocyte type 1 response to HPV antigens is associated with disease status. This result may reflect a targeted effect of the disease on immune function or a protective effect of the immune response against disease progression. 1 Present address: Third Department of Internal Medicine, Nippon Medical School. 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan. 2 To whom requests for reprints should be addressed. at Molecular Immunogenetics and Vaccine Research Section, Metabolism Branch, National Cancer Institute, Building 10, Room 6B-12 (MSC#1578), NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892-1578. Phone: (301) 496-6874; Fax: (301) 496-9956; E-mail: berzofsk@helix.nih.gov. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Research American Association of Cancer Research

Interleukin 2 Production in Vitro by Peripheral Lymphocytes in Response to Human Papillomavirus-derived Peptides: Correlation with Cervical Pathology

Interleukin 2 Production in Vitro by Peripheral Lymphocytes in Response to Human Papillomavirus-derived Peptides: Correlation with Cervical Pathology

Cancer Research , Volume 56 (17): 3967 – Sep 1, 1996

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is believed to be the major cause of cervical cancer. To investigate whether a cellular immune response, especially a T helper type 1 response, is related to the natural defense against HPV-related cervical lesions, the interleukin 2 response of peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro to overlapping peptides from HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins was compared with the degree of cervical cytological abnormality among 140 women in a cross-sectional study. We compared 66 women diagnosed with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 21 with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and 28 with invasive cervical cancer with 25 women who were cytologically normal but previously HPV-16 DNA positive. The fraction showing strong interleukin 2 production against HPV-16 peptides was greatest among cytologically normal women (35%) and declined with increasing disease severity LSIL (20%), HSIL (17%), and cancer patients (7%); X 2 test P for the trend = 0.02, whereas the responses against a recall influenza antigen were not significantly different among groups. Our finding suggests that a T helper lymphocyte type 1 response to HPV antigens is associated with disease status. This result may reflect a targeted effect of the disease on immune function or a protective effect of the immune response against disease progression. 1 Present address: Third Department of Internal Medicine, Nippon Medical School. 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan. 2 To whom requests for reprints should be addressed. at Molecular Immunogenetics and Vaccine Research Section, Metabolism Branch, National Cancer Institute, Building 10, Room 6B-12 (MSC#1578), NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892-1578. Phone: (301) 496-6874; Fax: (301) 496-9956; E-mail: berzofsk@helix.nih.gov.

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Publisher
American Association of Cancer Research
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by the American Association for Cancer Research.
ISSN
0008-5472
Publisher site

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is believed to be the major cause of cervical cancer. To investigate whether a cellular immune response, especially a T helper type 1 response, is related to the natural defense against HPV-related cervical lesions, the interleukin 2 response of peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro to overlapping peptides from HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins was compared with the degree of cervical cytological abnormality among 140 women in a cross-sectional study. We compared 66 women diagnosed with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 21 with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and 28 with invasive cervical cancer with 25 women who were cytologically normal but previously HPV-16 DNA positive. The fraction showing strong interleukin 2 production against HPV-16 peptides was greatest among cytologically normal women (35%) and declined with increasing disease severity LSIL (20%), HSIL (17%), and cancer patients (7%); X 2 test P for the trend = 0.02, whereas the responses against a recall influenza antigen were not significantly different among groups. Our finding suggests that a T helper lymphocyte type 1 response to HPV antigens is associated with disease status. This result may reflect a targeted effect of the disease on immune function or a protective effect of the immune response against disease progression. 1 Present address: Third Department of Internal Medicine, Nippon Medical School. 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan. 2 To whom requests for reprints should be addressed. at Molecular Immunogenetics and Vaccine Research Section, Metabolism Branch, National Cancer Institute, Building 10, Room 6B-12 (MSC#1578), NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892-1578. Phone: (301) 496-6874; Fax: (301) 496-9956; E-mail: berzofsk@helix.nih.gov.

Journal

Cancer ResearchAmerican Association of Cancer Research

Published: Sep 1, 1996

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