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Lymphoid Malignancies in U.S. Asians: Incidence Rate Differences by Birthplace and Acculturation

Lymphoid Malignancies in U.S. Asians: Incidence Rate Differences by Birthplace and Acculturation Background: Malignancies of the lymphoid cells, including non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), HL, and multiple myeloma, occur at much lower rates in Asians than other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. It remains unclear whether these deficits are explained by genetic or environmental factors. To better understand environmental contributions, we examined incidence patterns of lymphoid malignancies among populations characterized by ethnicity, birthplace, and residential neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and ethnic enclave status. Methods: We obtained data about all Asian patients diagnosed with lymphoid malignancies between 1988 and 2004 from the California Cancer Registry and neighborhood characteristics from U.S. Census data. Results: Although incidence rates of most lymphoid malignancies were lower among Asian than white populations, only follicular lymphoma (FL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), and nodular sclerosis (NS) HL rates were statistically significantly lower among foreign-born than U.S.-born Asians with incidence rate ratios ranging from 0.34 to 0.87. Rates of CLL/SLL and NS HL were also lower among Asian women living in ethnic enclaves or lower SES neighborhoods than those living elsewhere. Conclusions: These observations support strong roles of environmental factors in the causation of FL, CLL/SLL, and NS HL. Impact: Studying specific lymphoid malignancies in U.S. Asians may provide valuable insight toward understanding their environmental causes. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 20(6); 1064–77. ©2011 AACR . This article is featured in Highlights of This Issue, p. 1057 Received January 11, 2011. Revision received March 2, 2011. Accepted April 4, 2011. ©2011 American Association for Cancer Research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention American Association of Cancer Research

Lymphoid Malignancies in U.S. Asians: Incidence Rate Differences by Birthplace and Acculturation

Lymphoid Malignancies in U.S. Asians: Incidence Rate Differences by Birthplace and Acculturation

Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention , Volume 20 (6): 1064 – Jun 1, 2011

Abstract

Background: Malignancies of the lymphoid cells, including non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), HL, and multiple myeloma, occur at much lower rates in Asians than other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. It remains unclear whether these deficits are explained by genetic or environmental factors. To better understand environmental contributions, we examined incidence patterns of lymphoid malignancies among populations characterized by ethnicity, birthplace, and residential neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and ethnic enclave status. Methods: We obtained data about all Asian patients diagnosed with lymphoid malignancies between 1988 and 2004 from the California Cancer Registry and neighborhood characteristics from U.S. Census data. Results: Although incidence rates of most lymphoid malignancies were lower among Asian than white populations, only follicular lymphoma (FL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), and nodular sclerosis (NS) HL rates were statistically significantly lower among foreign-born than U.S.-born Asians with incidence rate ratios ranging from 0.34 to 0.87. Rates of CLL/SLL and NS HL were also lower among Asian women living in ethnic enclaves or lower SES neighborhoods than those living elsewhere. Conclusions: These observations support strong roles of environmental factors in the causation of FL, CLL/SLL, and NS HL. Impact: Studying specific lymphoid malignancies in U.S. Asians may provide valuable insight toward understanding their environmental causes. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 20(6); 1064–77. ©2011 AACR . This article is featured in Highlights of This Issue, p. 1057 Received January 11, 2011. Revision received March 2, 2011. Accepted April 4, 2011. ©2011 American Association for Cancer Research.

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References (58)

Publisher
American Association of Cancer Research
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 American Association for Cancer Research
ISSN
1078-0432
eISSN
1538-7755
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-0038
pmid
21493873
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background: Malignancies of the lymphoid cells, including non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), HL, and multiple myeloma, occur at much lower rates in Asians than other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. It remains unclear whether these deficits are explained by genetic or environmental factors. To better understand environmental contributions, we examined incidence patterns of lymphoid malignancies among populations characterized by ethnicity, birthplace, and residential neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and ethnic enclave status. Methods: We obtained data about all Asian patients diagnosed with lymphoid malignancies between 1988 and 2004 from the California Cancer Registry and neighborhood characteristics from U.S. Census data. Results: Although incidence rates of most lymphoid malignancies were lower among Asian than white populations, only follicular lymphoma (FL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), and nodular sclerosis (NS) HL rates were statistically significantly lower among foreign-born than U.S.-born Asians with incidence rate ratios ranging from 0.34 to 0.87. Rates of CLL/SLL and NS HL were also lower among Asian women living in ethnic enclaves or lower SES neighborhoods than those living elsewhere. Conclusions: These observations support strong roles of environmental factors in the causation of FL, CLL/SLL, and NS HL. Impact: Studying specific lymphoid malignancies in U.S. Asians may provide valuable insight toward understanding their environmental causes. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 20(6); 1064–77. ©2011 AACR . This article is featured in Highlights of This Issue, p. 1057 Received January 11, 2011. Revision received March 2, 2011. Accepted April 4, 2011. ©2011 American Association for Cancer Research.

Journal

Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & PreventionAmerican Association of Cancer Research

Published: Jun 1, 2011

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