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Survivin: Key Regulator of Mitosis and Apoptosis and Novel Target for Cancer Therapeutics

Survivin: Key Regulator of Mitosis and Apoptosis and Novel Target for Cancer Therapeutics Survivin, a member of the family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, functions as a key regulator of mitosis and programmed cell death. Initially, survivin was described as an inhibitor of caspase-9. However, over the last years, research studies have shown that the role of survivin in cancer pathogenesis is not limited to apoptosis inhibition but also involves the regulation of the mitotic spindle checkpoint and the promotion of angiogenesis and chemoresistance. Survivin gene expression is transcriptionally repressed by wild-type p53 and can be deregulated in cancer by several mechanisms, including gene amplification, hypomethylation, increased promoter activity, and loss of p53 function. This article reviews the multiple functions of survivin in the regulation of apoptosis, the promotion of tumorigenesis, and the development of survivin inhibitors as a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Cancer Research American Association of Cancer Research

Survivin: Key Regulator of Mitosis and Apoptosis and Novel Target for Cancer Therapeutics

Survivin: Key Regulator of Mitosis and Apoptosis and Novel Target for Cancer Therapeutics

Clinical Cancer Research , Volume 14 (16): 5000 – Aug 15, 2008

Abstract

Survivin, a member of the family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, functions as a key regulator of mitosis and programmed cell death. Initially, survivin was described as an inhibitor of caspase-9. However, over the last years, research studies have shown that the role of survivin in cancer pathogenesis is not limited to apoptosis inhibition but also involves the regulation of the mitotic spindle checkpoint and the promotion of angiogenesis and chemoresistance. Survivin gene expression is transcriptionally repressed by wild-type p53 and can be deregulated in cancer by several mechanisms, including gene amplification, hypomethylation, increased promoter activity, and loss of p53 function. This article reviews the multiple functions of survivin in the regulation of apoptosis, the promotion of tumorigenesis, and the development of survivin inhibitors as a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy.

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References (86)

Publisher
American Association of Cancer Research
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 American Association for Cancer Research
ISSN
1078-0432
eISSN
1557-3265
DOI
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-0746
pmid
18698017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Survivin, a member of the family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, functions as a key regulator of mitosis and programmed cell death. Initially, survivin was described as an inhibitor of caspase-9. However, over the last years, research studies have shown that the role of survivin in cancer pathogenesis is not limited to apoptosis inhibition but also involves the regulation of the mitotic spindle checkpoint and the promotion of angiogenesis and chemoresistance. Survivin gene expression is transcriptionally repressed by wild-type p53 and can be deregulated in cancer by several mechanisms, including gene amplification, hypomethylation, increased promoter activity, and loss of p53 function. This article reviews the multiple functions of survivin in the regulation of apoptosis, the promotion of tumorigenesis, and the development of survivin inhibitors as a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy.

Journal

Clinical Cancer ResearchAmerican Association of Cancer Research

Published: Aug 15, 2008

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