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Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood Predicts Survival in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood Predicts Survival in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Telomeres are repetitive structures located at chromosome ends. Previous studies have indicated that blood cell telomeres may serve as a biomarker for cancer risk. In addition, we recently reported that blood telomere length predicted survival in patients with breast cancer. In the present study, we examined whether blood telomere length may act as a predictor for survival in newly diagnosed patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Furthermore, we analyzed telomere length in tumor samples and corresponding kidney cortex. Relative telomere length (RTL) was measured on extracted DNA using real-time PCR. Interestingly, and in line with our previous findings in breast cancer, patients with the longest blood telomeres (fourth quartile) had a significantly worse prognosis compared with patients with shorter blood RTL ( P = 0.005). A highly significant association was found between long blood telomeres and a poor outcome in patients with nonmetastatic disease ( P < 0.001), whereas patients with distant metastases had a poor survival regardless of blood RTL ( P = 0.432). No correlations were found between blood RTL and various clinical variables, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, hemoglobin, and thrombocyte count. Multivariate Cox regression analysis verified long blood RTL as an independent negative prognostic marker. In contrast, telomere length in kidney cortex and tumor tissue did not predict survival. In conclusion, our results indicate that blood RTL may predict kidney cancer survival, with implications for future treatment strategies. Cancer Res 2009;69(7):2896–901 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Research American Association of Cancer Research

Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood Predicts Survival in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

Cancer Research , Volume 69 (7): 2896 – Apr 1, 2009

Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood Predicts Survival in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

Cancer Research , Volume 69 (7): 2896 – Apr 1, 2009

Abstract

Telomeres are repetitive structures located at chromosome ends. Previous studies have indicated that blood cell telomeres may serve as a biomarker for cancer risk. In addition, we recently reported that blood telomere length predicted survival in patients with breast cancer. In the present study, we examined whether blood telomere length may act as a predictor for survival in newly diagnosed patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Furthermore, we analyzed telomere length in tumor samples and corresponding kidney cortex. Relative telomere length (RTL) was measured on extracted DNA using real-time PCR. Interestingly, and in line with our previous findings in breast cancer, patients with the longest blood telomeres (fourth quartile) had a significantly worse prognosis compared with patients with shorter blood RTL ( P = 0.005). A highly significant association was found between long blood telomeres and a poor outcome in patients with nonmetastatic disease ( P < 0.001), whereas patients with distant metastases had a poor survival regardless of blood RTL ( P = 0.432). No correlations were found between blood RTL and various clinical variables, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, hemoglobin, and thrombocyte count. Multivariate Cox regression analysis verified long blood RTL as an independent negative prognostic marker. In contrast, telomere length in kidney cortex and tumor tissue did not predict survival. In conclusion, our results indicate that blood RTL may predict kidney cancer survival, with implications for future treatment strategies. Cancer Res 2009;69(7):2896–901

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Publisher
American Association of Cancer Research
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by the American Association for Cancer Research.
ISSN
0008-5472
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-08-3513
pmid
19318563
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Telomeres are repetitive structures located at chromosome ends. Previous studies have indicated that blood cell telomeres may serve as a biomarker for cancer risk. In addition, we recently reported that blood telomere length predicted survival in patients with breast cancer. In the present study, we examined whether blood telomere length may act as a predictor for survival in newly diagnosed patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Furthermore, we analyzed telomere length in tumor samples and corresponding kidney cortex. Relative telomere length (RTL) was measured on extracted DNA using real-time PCR. Interestingly, and in line with our previous findings in breast cancer, patients with the longest blood telomeres (fourth quartile) had a significantly worse prognosis compared with patients with shorter blood RTL ( P = 0.005). A highly significant association was found between long blood telomeres and a poor outcome in patients with nonmetastatic disease ( P < 0.001), whereas patients with distant metastases had a poor survival regardless of blood RTL ( P = 0.432). No correlations were found between blood RTL and various clinical variables, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, hemoglobin, and thrombocyte count. Multivariate Cox regression analysis verified long blood RTL as an independent negative prognostic marker. In contrast, telomere length in kidney cortex and tumor tissue did not predict survival. In conclusion, our results indicate that blood RTL may predict kidney cancer survival, with implications for future treatment strategies. Cancer Res 2009;69(7):2896–901

Journal

Cancer ResearchAmerican Association of Cancer Research

Published: Apr 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.