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Telomere Length in White Blood Cell DNA and Lung Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Cohorts

Telomere Length in White Blood Cell DNA and Lung Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective... We investigated the relationship between telomere length and lung cancer in a pooled analysis from three prospective cohort studies: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, conducted among men and women in the United States, and previously published data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Trial conducted among male smokers in Finland, and the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), which is comprised primarily of never-smokers. The pooled population included 847 cases and 847 controls matched by study, age, and sex. Leukocyte telomere length was measured by a monochrome multiplex qPCR assay. We used conditional logistic regression models to calculate ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between telomere length and lung cancer risk, adjusted for age and pack-years of smoking. Longer telomere length was associated with increased lung cancer risk in the pooled analysis (OR (95% CI) by quartile: 1.00; 1.24 (0.90–1.71); 1.27 (0.91–1.78); and 1.86 (1.33–2.62); P trend = 0.000022). Findings were consistent across the three cohorts and strongest for subjects with very long telomere length, i.e., lung cancer risks for telomere length (OR (95% CI)) in the upper half of the fourth quartile were 2.41 (1.28–4.52), 2.16 (1.11–4.23), and 3.02(1.39–6.58) for the PLCO trial, the ATBC trial, and the SWHS, respectively. In addition, the association persisted among cases diagnosed more than 6 years after blood collection and was particularly evident for female adenocarcinoma cases. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA may be a biomarker of future increased risk of lung cancer in diverse populations. Cancer Res; 74(15); 4090–8. ©2014 AACR . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Research American Association of Cancer Research

Telomere Length in White Blood Cell DNA and Lung Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Cohorts

Cancer Research , Volume 74 (15): 4090 – Aug 1, 2014

Abstract

We investigated the relationship between telomere length and lung cancer in a pooled analysis from three prospective cohort studies: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, conducted among men and women in the United States, and previously published data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Trial conducted among male smokers in Finland, and the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), which is comprised primarily of never-smokers. The pooled population included 847 cases and 847 controls matched by study, age, and sex. Leukocyte telomere length was measured by a monochrome multiplex qPCR assay. We used conditional logistic regression models to calculate ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between telomere length and lung cancer risk, adjusted for age and pack-years of smoking. Longer telomere length was associated with increased lung cancer risk in the pooled analysis (OR (95% CI) by quartile: 1.00; 1.24 (0.90–1.71); 1.27 (0.91–1.78); and 1.86 (1.33–2.62); P trend = 0.000022). Findings were consistent across the three cohorts and strongest for subjects with very long telomere length, i.e., lung cancer risks for telomere length (OR (95% CI)) in the upper half of the fourth quartile were 2.41 (1.28–4.52), 2.16 (1.11–4.23), and 3.02(1.39–6.58) for the PLCO trial, the ATBC trial, and the SWHS, respectively. In addition, the association persisted among cases diagnosed more than 6 years after blood collection and was particularly evident for female adenocarcinoma cases. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA may be a biomarker of future increased risk of lung cancer in diverse populations. Cancer Res; 74(15); 4090–8. ©2014 AACR .

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References (53)

Publisher
American Association of Cancer Research
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 American Association for Cancer Research
ISSN
0008-5472
eISSN
1538-7445
DOI
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-14-0459
pmid
24853549
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We investigated the relationship between telomere length and lung cancer in a pooled analysis from three prospective cohort studies: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, conducted among men and women in the United States, and previously published data from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Trial conducted among male smokers in Finland, and the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS), which is comprised primarily of never-smokers. The pooled population included 847 cases and 847 controls matched by study, age, and sex. Leukocyte telomere length was measured by a monochrome multiplex qPCR assay. We used conditional logistic regression models to calculate ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between telomere length and lung cancer risk, adjusted for age and pack-years of smoking. Longer telomere length was associated with increased lung cancer risk in the pooled analysis (OR (95% CI) by quartile: 1.00; 1.24 (0.90–1.71); 1.27 (0.91–1.78); and 1.86 (1.33–2.62); P trend = 0.000022). Findings were consistent across the three cohorts and strongest for subjects with very long telomere length, i.e., lung cancer risks for telomere length (OR (95% CI)) in the upper half of the fourth quartile were 2.41 (1.28–4.52), 2.16 (1.11–4.23), and 3.02(1.39–6.58) for the PLCO trial, the ATBC trial, and the SWHS, respectively. In addition, the association persisted among cases diagnosed more than 6 years after blood collection and was particularly evident for female adenocarcinoma cases. Telomere length in white blood cell DNA may be a biomarker of future increased risk of lung cancer in diverse populations. Cancer Res; 74(15); 4090–8. ©2014 AACR .

Journal

Cancer ResearchAmerican Association of Cancer Research

Published: Aug 1, 2014

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