Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Experimental Research on Labor Market Discrimination†

Experimental Research on Labor Market Discrimination† AbstractUnderstanding whether labor market discrimination explains inferior labor market outcomes for many groups has drawn the attention of labor economists for decades— at least since the publication of Gary Becker’s The Economics of Discrimination in 1957. The decades of research on discrimination in labor markets began with a regression-based “decomposition” approach, asking whether raw wage or earnings differences between groups—which might constitute prima facie evidence of discrimination—were in fact attributable to other productivity-related factors. Subsequent research—responding in large part to limitations of the regression-based approach—moved on to other approaches, such as using firm-level data to estimate both marginal productivity and wage differentials. In recent years, however, there has been substantial growth in experimental research on labor market discrimination—although the earliest experiments were done decades ago. Some experimental research on labor market discrimination takes place in the lab. But far more of it is done in the field, which makes this particular area of experimental research unique relative to the explosion of experimental economic research more generally. This paper surveys the full range of experimental literature on labor market discrimination, places it in the context of the broader research literature on labor market discrimination, discusses the experimental literature from many different perspectives (empirical, theoretical, and policy), and reviews both what this literature has taught us thus far, and what remains to be done. (JEL C93, J14, J15, J16, J23, J41, J71) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Economic Literature American Economic Association

Experimental Research on Labor Market Discrimination†

Journal of Economic Literature , Volume 56 (3) – Sep 1, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-economic-association/experimental-research-on-labor-market-discrimination-PcJ825n8nm

References (203)

Publisher
American Economic Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 © American Economic Association
ISSN
0022-0515
DOI
10.1257/jel.20161309
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractUnderstanding whether labor market discrimination explains inferior labor market outcomes for many groups has drawn the attention of labor economists for decades— at least since the publication of Gary Becker’s The Economics of Discrimination in 1957. The decades of research on discrimination in labor markets began with a regression-based “decomposition” approach, asking whether raw wage or earnings differences between groups—which might constitute prima facie evidence of discrimination—were in fact attributable to other productivity-related factors. Subsequent research—responding in large part to limitations of the regression-based approach—moved on to other approaches, such as using firm-level data to estimate both marginal productivity and wage differentials. In recent years, however, there has been substantial growth in experimental research on labor market discrimination—although the earliest experiments were done decades ago. Some experimental research on labor market discrimination takes place in the lab. But far more of it is done in the field, which makes this particular area of experimental research unique relative to the explosion of experimental economic research more generally. This paper surveys the full range of experimental literature on labor market discrimination, places it in the context of the broader research literature on labor market discrimination, discusses the experimental literature from many different perspectives (empirical, theoretical, and policy), and reviews both what this literature has taught us thus far, and what remains to be done. (JEL C93, J14, J15, J16, J23, J41, J71)

Journal

Journal of Economic LiteratureAmerican Economic Association

Published: Sep 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.