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How Elastic Are Preferences for Redistribution? Evidence from Randomized Survey Experiments †

How Elastic Are Preferences for Redistribution? Evidence from Randomized Survey Experiments † Abstract We analyze randomized online survey experiments providing interactive, customized information on US income inequality, the link between top income tax rates and economic growth, and the estate tax. The treatment has large effects on views about inequality but only slightly moves tax and transfer policy preferences. An exception is the estate tax—informing respondents of the small share of decedents who pay it doubles support for it. The small effects for all other policies can be partially explained by respondents' low trust in government and a disconnect between concerns about social issues and the public policies meant to address them. (JEL D31, D72, H23, H24 ) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Economic Review American Economic Association

How Elastic Are Preferences for Redistribution? Evidence from Randomized Survey Experiments †

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Publisher
American Economic Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by the American Economic Association
Subject
Articles
ISSN
0002-8282
DOI
10.1257/aer.20130360
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract We analyze randomized online survey experiments providing interactive, customized information on US income inequality, the link between top income tax rates and economic growth, and the estate tax. The treatment has large effects on views about inequality but only slightly moves tax and transfer policy preferences. An exception is the estate tax—informing respondents of the small share of decedents who pay it doubles support for it. The small effects for all other policies can be partially explained by respondents' low trust in government and a disconnect between concerns about social issues and the public policies meant to address them. (JEL D31, D72, H23, H24 )

Journal

American Economic ReviewAmerican Economic Association

Published: Apr 1, 2015

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