Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Knowledge Spillovers and Patent Citations: Evidence from a Survey of Inventors

Knowledge Spillovers and Patent Citations: Evidence from a Survey of Inventors THE NBER/SLOAN PROJECT ON INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTIVITY: INCORPORATING LEARNING FROM PLANT VISITS AND INTERVIEWS INTO ECONOMIC RESEARCH†By ADAM B. JAFFE, MANUEL TRAJTENBERG, It is well understood that the non-rival nature of knowledge as a productive asset creates the possibility of “knowledge spillovers,” whereby investments in knowledge creation by one party produce external benefits by facilitating innovation by other parties. At least since Zvi Griliches’s (1979) seminal paper on measuring the contributions of R&D to economic growth, economists have been attempting to quantify the extent and impact of knowledge spillovers. One line of research of this type has utilized patent citations to identify a “paper trail” that may be associated with knowledge flows between firms.1 Very little of this research has attempted to determine the modes or mechanisms of communication that actually permit knowledge to flow. Further, most of the work has simply assumed that citations or other proxies are sufficiently correlated with knowledge flows to allow statistical analysis of the proxies to AND MICHAEL S. FOGARTY* be informative regarding the underlying phenomenon of interest. This paper reports on a preliminary attempt to improve this situation. The idea for this survey came from R&D managers whom we http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Economic Review American Economic Association

Knowledge Spillovers and Patent Citations: Evidence from a Survey of Inventors

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-economic-association/knowledge-spillovers-and-patent-citations-evidence-from-a-survey-of-JYgXENpD9u

References (6)

Publisher
American Economic Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by the American Economic Association
Subject
Papers
ISSN
0002-8282
DOI
10.1257/aer.90.2.215
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE NBER/SLOAN PROJECT ON INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTIVITY: INCORPORATING LEARNING FROM PLANT VISITS AND INTERVIEWS INTO ECONOMIC RESEARCH†By ADAM B. JAFFE, MANUEL TRAJTENBERG, It is well understood that the non-rival nature of knowledge as a productive asset creates the possibility of “knowledge spillovers,” whereby investments in knowledge creation by one party produce external benefits by facilitating innovation by other parties. At least since Zvi Griliches’s (1979) seminal paper on measuring the contributions of R&D to economic growth, economists have been attempting to quantify the extent and impact of knowledge spillovers. One line of research of this type has utilized patent citations to identify a “paper trail” that may be associated with knowledge flows between firms.1 Very little of this research has attempted to determine the modes or mechanisms of communication that actually permit knowledge to flow. Further, most of the work has simply assumed that citations or other proxies are sufficiently correlated with knowledge flows to allow statistical analysis of the proxies to AND MICHAEL S. FOGARTY* be informative regarding the underlying phenomenon of interest. This paper reports on a preliminary attempt to improve this situation. The idea for this survey came from R&D managers whom we

Journal

American Economic ReviewAmerican Economic Association

Published: May 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.