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Mind Glue

Mind Glue PERSPECTIVES Implications of Glial Cell Biology for Psychiatry Joseph T. Coyle, MD; Robert Schwarcz, PhD he legacy of the last century of research in psychiatry has been the sophisticated un- derstanding of the role of neuronal systems in brain function and ultimately in psy- chopathology. As a consequence, an armamentarium of drugs to treat neuropsychiat- T ric disorders has been developed that work by altering chemical neurotransmission in the brain. Curiously, little attention has been paid to the nonneuronal cellular components of the brain, which outnumber neurons by a factor of 10. Glia, a heterogeneous population of cells, have largely been viewed as passive handmaidens to the neurons, which have been considered the pri- mary arbiters of information processing in the brain. The term glia, which means glue in German, was first applied to these cells by Virchow in a psychiatric report more than 150 years ago. Recent research, however, has demon- transmission, the sodium-potassium aden- strated that glia are far from passive but osine triphosphatase of adjacent astro- actively participate in the communica- cytes is activated. The ion pump, fueled tional processes of the brain. Distur- by adenosine triphosphate, promotes as- bances of glial function could conceiv- trocytic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Psychiatry American Medical Association

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References (50)

Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2000 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-622X
eISSN
2168-6238
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.57.1.90
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PERSPECTIVES Implications of Glial Cell Biology for Psychiatry Joseph T. Coyle, MD; Robert Schwarcz, PhD he legacy of the last century of research in psychiatry has been the sophisticated un- derstanding of the role of neuronal systems in brain function and ultimately in psy- chopathology. As a consequence, an armamentarium of drugs to treat neuropsychiat- T ric disorders has been developed that work by altering chemical neurotransmission in the brain. Curiously, little attention has been paid to the nonneuronal cellular components of the brain, which outnumber neurons by a factor of 10. Glia, a heterogeneous population of cells, have largely been viewed as passive handmaidens to the neurons, which have been considered the pri- mary arbiters of information processing in the brain. The term glia, which means glue in German, was first applied to these cells by Virchow in a psychiatric report more than 150 years ago. Recent research, however, has demon- transmission, the sodium-potassium aden- strated that glia are far from passive but osine triphosphatase of adjacent astro- actively participate in the communica- cytes is activated. The ion pump, fueled tional processes of the brain. Distur- by adenosine triphosphate, promotes as- bances of glial function could conceiv- trocytic

Journal

JAMA PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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