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Smoking and All-Cause Mortality in Older People

Smoking and All-Cause Mortality in Older People REVIEW ARTICLE Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Carolin Gellert; Ben Scho¨ttker, PhD, MPH; Hermann Brenner, MD, MPH Background: Smoking is an established risk factor of never smokers ranged from 1.2 to 3.4 across studies and premature death. However, most pertinent studies pri- was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.65-2.03) in the meta-analysis. A de- marily relied on middle-aged adults. We performed a sys- crease of RM of current smokers with increasing age was tematic review and meta-analysis of the empirical evi- observed, but mortality remained increased up to the high- dence on the association of smoking with all-cause est ages. Furthermore, a dose-response relationship of the mortality in people 60 years and older. amount of smoked cigarettes and premature death was ob- served. Former smokers likewise had an increased mor- Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted tality (meta-analysis: RM, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.28-1.40), but ex- in multiple databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and cess mortality compared with never smokers clearly ISI Web of Knowledge and complemented by cross- decreased with duration of cessation. Benefits of smoking referencing to identify cohort studies published before July cessation were evident in all age groups, including sub- 2011. Core items of identified studies were independently jects http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Smoking and All-Cause Mortality in Older People

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References (58)

Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/archinternmed.2012.1397
pmid
22688992
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEW ARTICLE Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Carolin Gellert; Ben Scho¨ttker, PhD, MPH; Hermann Brenner, MD, MPH Background: Smoking is an established risk factor of never smokers ranged from 1.2 to 3.4 across studies and premature death. However, most pertinent studies pri- was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.65-2.03) in the meta-analysis. A de- marily relied on middle-aged adults. We performed a sys- crease of RM of current smokers with increasing age was tematic review and meta-analysis of the empirical evi- observed, but mortality remained increased up to the high- dence on the association of smoking with all-cause est ages. Furthermore, a dose-response relationship of the mortality in people 60 years and older. amount of smoked cigarettes and premature death was ob- served. Former smokers likewise had an increased mor- Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted tality (meta-analysis: RM, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.28-1.40), but ex- in multiple databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and cess mortality compared with never smokers clearly ISI Web of Knowledge and complemented by cross- decreased with duration of cessation. Benefits of smoking referencing to identify cohort studies published before July cessation were evident in all age groups, including sub- 2011. Core items of identified studies were independently jects

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 11, 2012

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