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Technology-Enhanced Simulation for Health Professions Education

Technology-Enhanced Simulation for Health Professions Education REVIEW Technology-Enhanced Simulation for Health Professions Education A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis David A. Cook, MD, MHPE Context Although technology-enhanced simulation has widespread appeal, its ef- Rose Hatala, MD, MSc fectiveness remains uncertain. A comprehensive synthesis of evidence may inform the use of simulation in health professions education. Ryan Brydges, PhD Objective To summarize the outcomes of technology-enhanced simulation train- Benjamin Zendejas, MD, MSc ing for health professions learners in comparison with no intervention. Jason H. Szostek, MD Data Source Systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ERIC, PsychINFO, Amy T. Wang, MD Scopus, key journals, and previous review bibliographies through May 2011. Patricia J. Erwin, MLS Study Selection Original research in any language evaluating simulation com- pared with no intervention for training practicing and student physicians, nurses, den- Stanley J. Hamstra, PhD tists, and other health care professionals. ESPONDING TO CHANGING Data Extraction Reviewers working in duplicate evaluated quality and abstracted information on learners, instructional design (curricular integration, distributing train- practice environments re- ing over multiple days, feedback, mastery learning, and repetitive practice), and out- quires new models for train- comes. We coded skills (performance in a test setting) separately for time, process, Ring health care professionals. and product http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Technology-Enhanced Simulation for Health Professions Education

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References (35)

Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2011.1234
pmid
21900138
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEW Technology-Enhanced Simulation for Health Professions Education A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis David A. Cook, MD, MHPE Context Although technology-enhanced simulation has widespread appeal, its ef- Rose Hatala, MD, MSc fectiveness remains uncertain. A comprehensive synthesis of evidence may inform the use of simulation in health professions education. Ryan Brydges, PhD Objective To summarize the outcomes of technology-enhanced simulation train- Benjamin Zendejas, MD, MSc ing for health professions learners in comparison with no intervention. Jason H. Szostek, MD Data Source Systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ERIC, PsychINFO, Amy T. Wang, MD Scopus, key journals, and previous review bibliographies through May 2011. Patricia J. Erwin, MLS Study Selection Original research in any language evaluating simulation com- pared with no intervention for training practicing and student physicians, nurses, den- Stanley J. Hamstra, PhD tists, and other health care professionals. ESPONDING TO CHANGING Data Extraction Reviewers working in duplicate evaluated quality and abstracted information on learners, instructional design (curricular integration, distributing train- practice environments re- ing over multiple days, feedback, mastery learning, and repetitive practice), and out- quires new models for train- comes. We coded skills (performance in a test setting) separately for time, process, Ring health care professionals. and product

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 7, 2011

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