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The Cholera Years: The United States in 1832, 1849 and 1866

The Cholera Years: The United States in 1832, 1849 and 1866 In 1988 when one thinks of "epidemic diseases," the first to come to mind is the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is therefore instructive to recall that, Cholera was the classic epidemic disease of the nineteenth century, as plague had been in the fourteenth. When cholera first appeared in the United States in 1832, yellow fever and smallpox, the great epidemic diseases of the previous two centuries, were no longer truly national problems. Yellow fever had disappeared from the North, and vaccination had deprived smallpox of much of its menace. Cholera, on the other hand, appeared in almost every part of the country. It flourished in the great cities, New York, Cincinnati, Chicago; it crossed the continent with the forty-niners; its victims included Iowa dirt farmers and New York longshoremen, Wisconsin lead miners and Negro field hands. Rosenberg has chosen New York City as the focus of his work and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

The Cholera Years: The United States in 1832, 1849 and 1866

JAMA , Volume 260 (2) – Jul 8, 1988

The Cholera Years: The United States in 1832, 1849 and 1866

Abstract


In 1988 when one thinks of "epidemic diseases," the first to come to mind is the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is therefore instructive to recall that,
Cholera was the classic epidemic disease of the nineteenth century, as plague had been in the fourteenth. When cholera first appeared in the United States in 1832, yellow fever and smallpox, the great epidemic diseases of the previous two centuries, were no longer truly national problems. Yellow fever had disappeared...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1988.03410020138049
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 1988 when one thinks of "epidemic diseases," the first to come to mind is the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is therefore instructive to recall that, Cholera was the classic epidemic disease of the nineteenth century, as plague had been in the fourteenth. When cholera first appeared in the United States in 1832, yellow fever and smallpox, the great epidemic diseases of the previous two centuries, were no longer truly national problems. Yellow fever had disappeared from the North, and vaccination had deprived smallpox of much of its menace. Cholera, on the other hand, appeared in almost every part of the country. It flourished in the great cities, New York, Cincinnati, Chicago; it crossed the continent with the forty-niners; its victims included Iowa dirt farmers and New York longshoremen, Wisconsin lead miners and Negro field hands. Rosenberg has chosen New York City as the focus of his work and

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 8, 1988

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