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Search for Hidden Sector Photons with the ADMX Detector

Search for Hidden Sector Photons with the ADMX Detector Hidden U(1) gauge symmetries are common to many extensions of the standard model proposed to explain dark matter. The hidden gauge vector bosons of such extensions may mix kinetically with standard model photons, providing a means for electromagnetic power to pass through conducting barriers. The axion dark matter experiment detector was used to search for hidden vector bosons originating in an emitter cavity driven with microwave power. We exclude hidden vector bosons with kinetic couplings χ > 3.48 × 10 - 8 for masses less than 3 μ eV . This limit represents an improvement of more than 2 orders of magnitude in sensitivity relative to previous cavity experiments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review Letters American Physical Society (APS)

Search for Hidden Sector Photons with the ADMX Detector

Physical Review Letters , Volume 105 (17) – Oct 22, 2010
4 pages

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References (1)

Publisher
American Physical Society (APS)
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 The American Physical Society
ISSN
1079-7114
DOI
10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.171801
pmid
21231034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hidden U(1) gauge symmetries are common to many extensions of the standard model proposed to explain dark matter. The hidden gauge vector bosons of such extensions may mix kinetically with standard model photons, providing a means for electromagnetic power to pass through conducting barriers. The axion dark matter experiment detector was used to search for hidden vector bosons originating in an emitter cavity driven with microwave power. We exclude hidden vector bosons with kinetic couplings χ > 3.48 × 10 - 8 for masses less than 3 μ eV . This limit represents an improvement of more than 2 orders of magnitude in sensitivity relative to previous cavity experiments.

Journal

Physical Review LettersAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Oct 22, 2010

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