Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Will the Genomics Revolution Revolutionize Psychiatry?

Will the Genomics Revolution Revolutionize Psychiatry? At the time DNA was discovered 50 years ago, psychiatric genetics was in a state of relative dormancy, resulting from the misuse of genetic theories during the World War II era. As the excitement generated by the "new genetics" spread across medical specialty areas, the second half of the century was declared the century of the biological sciences, and genetics research blossomed (1). Dismissing the widespread notion of a basic conflict between human genetics and religious tenets, Pope Pius XII gave a policy-setting address in 1953, encouraging the need for systematic and ideologically unshackled research in human genetics (1). In the same year as the discovery of DNA, Franz Kallman’s review of progress in psychiatric genetics, published in The American Journal of Psychiatry, described a sophisticated series of twin and family studies in the United States (1–3) and Europe (4, 5) that corroborated the genetic roots of schizophrenia and manic depressive psychosis that had been demonstrated in the early part of the 20th century. Subsequent research has continued to expand our knowledge of the genetics of psychiatric disorders. As the classification system has grown more specific, genetic investigations have continued to demonstrate the importance of familial and genetic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Psychiatry American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)

Will the Genomics Revolution Revolutionize Psychiatry?

Will the Genomics Revolution Revolutionize Psychiatry?

American Journal of Psychiatry , Volume 160 (4): 625 – Apr 1, 2003

Abstract

At the time DNA was discovered 50 years ago, psychiatric genetics was in a state of relative dormancy, resulting from the misuse of genetic theories during the World War II era. As the excitement generated by the "new genetics" spread across medical specialty areas, the second half of the century was declared the century of the biological sciences, and genetics research blossomed (1). Dismissing the widespread notion of a basic conflict between human genetics and religious tenets, Pope Pius XII gave a policy-setting address in 1953, encouraging the need for systematic and ideologically unshackled research in human genetics (1). In the same year as the discovery of DNA, Franz Kallman’s review of progress in psychiatric genetics, published in The American Journal of Psychiatry, described a sophisticated series of twin and family studies in the United States (1–3) and Europe (4, 5) that corroborated the genetic roots of schizophrenia and manic depressive psychosis that had been demonstrated in the early part of the 20th century. Subsequent research has continued to expand our knowledge of the genetics of psychiatric disorders. As the classification system has grown more specific, genetic investigations have continued to demonstrate the importance of familial and genetic

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-psychiatric-publishing-inc-journal/will-the-genomics-revolution-revolutionize-psychiatry-Wk5fSxgk1Y

References (115)

Publisher
American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0002-953X
DOI
10.1176/appi.ajp.160.4.625
pmid
12668348
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

At the time DNA was discovered 50 years ago, psychiatric genetics was in a state of relative dormancy, resulting from the misuse of genetic theories during the World War II era. As the excitement generated by the "new genetics" spread across medical specialty areas, the second half of the century was declared the century of the biological sciences, and genetics research blossomed (1). Dismissing the widespread notion of a basic conflict between human genetics and religious tenets, Pope Pius XII gave a policy-setting address in 1953, encouraging the need for systematic and ideologically unshackled research in human genetics (1). In the same year as the discovery of DNA, Franz Kallman’s review of progress in psychiatric genetics, published in The American Journal of Psychiatry, described a sophisticated series of twin and family studies in the United States (1–3) and Europe (4, 5) that corroborated the genetic roots of schizophrenia and manic depressive psychosis that had been demonstrated in the early part of the 20th century. Subsequent research has continued to expand our knowledge of the genetics of psychiatric disorders. As the classification system has grown more specific, genetic investigations have continued to demonstrate the importance of familial and genetic

Journal

American Journal of PsychiatryAmerican Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)

Published: Apr 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.