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A Longitudinal Study of Reading Development in Dyslexic Children

A Longitudinal Study of Reading Development in Dyslexic Children The development of literacy skills was studied in 20 dyslexic children (7 years 7 months to 12 years 7 months). At Time 1, the dyslexic children performed worse on tests of reading, spelling, and phonological processing than chronological age-matched normal readers, but their performance was qualitatively similar to that of younger reading age-matched controls. The dyslexic children made poor progress over the following 2 years and, in comparison with reading age controls at Time 2, showed specific difficulties in nonword reading and repetition and made more dysphonetic spelling errors. The authors argue that this typical dyslexic profile becomes more defined with development and provides support for the theory that phonological deficits in dyslexia compromise the development of reading skills. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Educational Psychology American Psychological Association

A Longitudinal Study of Reading Development in Dyslexic Children

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References (41)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-0663
eISSN
1939-2176
DOI
10.1037/0022-0663.88.4.653
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The development of literacy skills was studied in 20 dyslexic children (7 years 7 months to 12 years 7 months). At Time 1, the dyslexic children performed worse on tests of reading, spelling, and phonological processing than chronological age-matched normal readers, but their performance was qualitatively similar to that of younger reading age-matched controls. The dyslexic children made poor progress over the following 2 years and, in comparison with reading age controls at Time 2, showed specific difficulties in nonword reading and repetition and made more dysphonetic spelling errors. The authors argue that this typical dyslexic profile becomes more defined with development and provides support for the theory that phonological deficits in dyslexia compromise the development of reading skills.

Journal

Journal of Educational PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Dec 1, 1996

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