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A Meta-Analytic Review of Social, Self-Concept, and Behavioral Outcomes of Peer-Assisted Learning

A Meta-Analytic Review of Social, Self-Concept, and Behavioral Outcomes of Peer-Assisted Learning Meta-analysis was used to examine social, self-concept, and behavioral effects of peer-assisted learning (PAL) interventions with elementary school students. An electronic search of PsycINFO and ERIC databases resulted in 36 relevant PAL studies. Overall, effect sizes were small to moderate across the 3 outcome variable domains. Both social and self-concept outcomes were positively correlated with academic outcomes. Specific PAL components—student autonomy, individualized evaluation, structured student roles, interdependent group rewards, and same-gender grouping—were related to effect sizes. PAL interventions were more effective for low-income versus higher income, urban versus suburban–rural, minority versus nonminority, and Grades 1–3 students versus Grades 4–6 students. Results suggest that PAL interventions that focus on academics can also improve social and self-concept outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Educational Psychology American Psychological Association

A Meta-Analytic Review of Social, Self-Concept, and Behavioral Outcomes of Peer-Assisted Learning

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-0663
eISSN
1939-2176
DOI
10.1037/0022-0663.98.4.732
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Meta-analysis was used to examine social, self-concept, and behavioral effects of peer-assisted learning (PAL) interventions with elementary school students. An electronic search of PsycINFO and ERIC databases resulted in 36 relevant PAL studies. Overall, effect sizes were small to moderate across the 3 outcome variable domains. Both social and self-concept outcomes were positively correlated with academic outcomes. Specific PAL components—student autonomy, individualized evaluation, structured student roles, interdependent group rewards, and same-gender grouping—were related to effect sizes. PAL interventions were more effective for low-income versus higher income, urban versus suburban–rural, minority versus nonminority, and Grades 1–3 students versus Grades 4–6 students. Results suggest that PAL interventions that focus on academics can also improve social and self-concept outcomes.

Journal

Journal of Educational PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Nov 1, 2006

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