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A model of egoistical relative deprivation

A model of egoistical relative deprivation Examines a theory of relative deprivation which states that objective and subjective well-being are not isomorphically related, so that sometimes the better off one is, the worse off one feels subjectively. After a brief review of work in the area of relative deprivation, a formal model is developed. It is argued that an individual feels resentment about failure to possess something (X) only when he sees that similar others possess X, he wants X, he feels entitled to possess X, he thinks that possession of X is feasible, and he does not blame himself for his failure to possess X. The antecedents of these conditions are explored, and the consequences of the emotion of relative deprivation are studied. Empirical evidence relating to and supporting the model is briefly discussed. (4 p ref) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Review American Psychological Association

A model of egoistical relative deprivation

Psychological Review , Volume 83 (2): 29 – Mar 1, 1976

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0033-295x
eISSN
1939-1471
DOI
10.1037/0033-295X.83.2.85
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Examines a theory of relative deprivation which states that objective and subjective well-being are not isomorphically related, so that sometimes the better off one is, the worse off one feels subjectively. After a brief review of work in the area of relative deprivation, a formal model is developed. It is argued that an individual feels resentment about failure to possess something (X) only when he sees that similar others possess X, he wants X, he feels entitled to possess X, he thinks that possession of X is feasible, and he does not blame himself for his failure to possess X. The antecedents of these conditions are explored, and the consequences of the emotion of relative deprivation are studied. Empirical evidence relating to and supporting the model is briefly discussed. (4 p ref)

Journal

Psychological ReviewAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Mar 1, 1976

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