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A Retrieval Cue for Extinction Attenuates Spontaneous Recovery

A Retrieval Cue for Extinction Attenuates Spontaneous Recovery Four experiments with rats in an appetitive conditioned magazine entry preparation examined spontaneous recovery after extinction. Spontaneous recovery was obtained 6 days but not 5 hr following extinction; recovery depended on the passage of time but not on the removal of a cue that was featured in extinction or on the reintroduction of early-session cues. A cue featured in extinction attenuated recovery when presented on the test. The attenuation effect depended on the cue’s correlation with extinction; a cue featured in conditioning did not attenuate recovery. The extinction cue did not evoke responding on its own, suggesting that it was not a conditioned excitor. Retardation tests and a summation test did not reveal that it was a conditioned inhibitor. The cue might work by retrieving a memory of extinction. Spontaneous recovery thus occurs because the subject fails to retrieve an extinction memory. Other accounts of spontaneous recovery are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition American Psychological Association

A Retrieval Cue for Extinction Attenuates Spontaneous Recovery

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References (39)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 American Psychological Association
ISSN
2329-8456
eISSN
2329-8464
DOI
10.1037/0097-7403.19.1.77
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Four experiments with rats in an appetitive conditioned magazine entry preparation examined spontaneous recovery after extinction. Spontaneous recovery was obtained 6 days but not 5 hr following extinction; recovery depended on the passage of time but not on the removal of a cue that was featured in extinction or on the reintroduction of early-session cues. A cue featured in extinction attenuated recovery when presented on the test. The attenuation effect depended on the cue’s correlation with extinction; a cue featured in conditioning did not attenuate recovery. The extinction cue did not evoke responding on its own, suggesting that it was not a conditioned excitor. Retardation tests and a summation test did not reveal that it was a conditioned inhibitor. The cue might work by retrieving a memory of extinction. Spontaneous recovery thus occurs because the subject fails to retrieve an extinction memory. Other accounts of spontaneous recovery are discussed.

Journal

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and CognitionAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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