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Being Mixed: Who Claims a Biracial Identity?

Being Mixed: Who Claims a Biracial Identity? What factors determine whether mixed-race individuals claim a biracial identity or a monoracial identity? Two studies examine how two status-related factors—race and social class—influence identity choice. While a majority of mixed-race participants identified as biracial in both studies, those who were members of groups with higher status in American society were more likely than those who were members of groups with lower status to claim a biracial identity. Specifically, (a) Asian/White individuals were more likely than Black/White or Latino/White individuals to identify as biracial and (b) mixed-race people from middle-class backgrounds were more likely than those from working-class backgrounds to identify as biracial. These results suggest that claiming a biracial identity is a choice that is more available to those with higher status. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology American Psychological Association

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References (58)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 American Psychological Association
ISSN
1099-9809
eISSN
1939-0106
DOI
10.1037/a0026845
pmid
22250901
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

What factors determine whether mixed-race individuals claim a biracial identity or a monoracial identity? Two studies examine how two status-related factors—race and social class—influence identity choice. While a majority of mixed-race participants identified as biracial in both studies, those who were members of groups with higher status in American society were more likely than those who were members of groups with lower status to claim a biracial identity. Specifically, (a) Asian/White individuals were more likely than Black/White or Latino/White individuals to identify as biracial and (b) mixed-race people from middle-class backgrounds were more likely than those from working-class backgrounds to identify as biracial. These results suggest that claiming a biracial identity is a choice that is more available to those with higher status.

Journal

Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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