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Conceptual Versus Experimental Creativity: Which Works Best on Convergent and Divergent Thinking Tasks?

Conceptual Versus Experimental Creativity: Which Works Best on Convergent and Divergent Thinking... David Galenson's research on creativity has identified two unique creative methods: conceptual and experimental. These methods have different processes, goals, and purposes. To determine whether (a) college students use one method more than the other, and (b) if one method is superior to the other, the authors randomly assigned 115 college students to use the conceptual creative method, the experimental creative method, or their own creative method (i.e., how they would solve a creative problem without instruction) while completing two types of convergent and divergent thinking tasks. Participants using the experimental creative method performed better than the other groups on both types of convergent thinking tasks, with most participants using the experimental creative method unaware of this increase in performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts American Psychological Association

Conceptual Versus Experimental Creativity: Which Works Best on Convergent and Divergent Thinking Tasks?

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References (53)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 American Psychological Association
ISSN
1931-3896
eISSN
1931-390X
DOI
10.1037/1931-3896.2.3.131
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

David Galenson's research on creativity has identified two unique creative methods: conceptual and experimental. These methods have different processes, goals, and purposes. To determine whether (a) college students use one method more than the other, and (b) if one method is superior to the other, the authors randomly assigned 115 college students to use the conceptual creative method, the experimental creative method, or their own creative method (i.e., how they would solve a creative problem without instruction) while completing two types of convergent and divergent thinking tasks. Participants using the experimental creative method performed better than the other groups on both types of convergent thinking tasks, with most participants using the experimental creative method unaware of this increase in performance.

Journal

Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the ArtsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Aug 1, 2008

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