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Conditioning, Remembering, and Forgetting

Conditioning, Remembering, and Forgetting Theories of learning and of memory have been artificially separated for many years. In this article it is argued that the separation should be abandoned. Remembering and forgetting play an important role in simple conditioning experiments. For example, conditioned performance can readily recover after extinction because extinction is susceptible to forgetting. Memory itself involves the kind of associative learning that conditioning experiments are designed to investigate (e.g., conditioning experiments provide insight into the mechanisms of memory retrieval). Learning, remembering, and forgetting all occur within the same biological context; their adaptive functions are therefore intertwined. Taken together, they shed light on some of the mechanisms of clinical relapse. Conditioning theory enriches, and is enriched by, the field of memory as well as other fields of behavioral science. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition American Psychological Association

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References (149)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 American Psychological Association
ISSN
2329-8456
eISSN
2329-8464
DOI
10.1037/0097-7403.20.3.219
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Theories of learning and of memory have been artificially separated for many years. In this article it is argued that the separation should be abandoned. Remembering and forgetting play an important role in simple conditioning experiments. For example, conditioned performance can readily recover after extinction because extinction is susceptible to forgetting. Memory itself involves the kind of associative learning that conditioning experiments are designed to investigate (e.g., conditioning experiments provide insight into the mechanisms of memory retrieval). Learning, remembering, and forgetting all occur within the same biological context; their adaptive functions are therefore intertwined. Taken together, they shed light on some of the mechanisms of clinical relapse. Conditioning theory enriches, and is enriched by, the field of memory as well as other fields of behavioral science.

Journal

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and CognitionAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jul 1, 1994

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