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Development of Eating Problems in Adolescent Girls: A Longitudinal Study

Development of Eating Problems in Adolescent Girls: A Longitudinal Study Examined the emergence of eating problems in adolescent girls as a function of pubertal growth, body image, personality development, and family relationships. 193 White females and their mothers were seen in middle-school years (M age = 13.93 years) and 2 years later. Results showed that girls who early in adolescence felt most negatively about their bodies were more likely to develop eating problems (on EAT -26) 2 years later. Concurrently, Time 1 eating problems were associated with body fat, grade, negative body image, and psychopathology, but not family relationships. At Time 2, adolescent body image and internalizing dimensions of psychopathology predicted problem-eating scores, as did maternal body image and depression. Findings are discussed in terms of adolescent patterns of adaptation, developmental psychopathology, and the study's relevance for understanding clinical eating disorders. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Psychology American Psychological Association

Development of Eating Problems in Adolescent Girls: A Longitudinal Study

Developmental Psychology , Volume 25 (1): 10 – Jan 1, 1989

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0012-1649
eISSN
1939-0599
DOI
10.1037/0012-1649.25.1.70
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Examined the emergence of eating problems in adolescent girls as a function of pubertal growth, body image, personality development, and family relationships. 193 White females and their mothers were seen in middle-school years (M age = 13.93 years) and 2 years later. Results showed that girls who early in adolescence felt most negatively about their bodies were more likely to develop eating problems (on EAT -26) 2 years later. Concurrently, Time 1 eating problems were associated with body fat, grade, negative body image, and psychopathology, but not family relationships. At Time 2, adolescent body image and internalizing dimensions of psychopathology predicted problem-eating scores, as did maternal body image and depression. Findings are discussed in terms of adolescent patterns of adaptation, developmental psychopathology, and the study's relevance for understanding clinical eating disorders.

Journal

Developmental PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 1989

There are no references for this article.