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Grit: Perseverance and Passion for Long-TermGoals

Grit: Perseverance and Passion for Long-TermGoals The importance of intellectual talent to achievement in allprofessional domains is well established, but less is knownabout other individual differences that predict success. Theauthors tested the importance of 1 noncognitive trait: grit.Defined as perseverance and passion for long-term goals,grit accounted for an average of 4% of the variance insuccess outcomes, including educational attainment among 2samples of adults (N = 1,545 andN = 690), grade point average among IvyLeague undergraduates (N = 138), retentionin 2 classes of United States Military Academy, West Point,cadets (N = 1,218 and N =1,308), and ranking in the National Spelling Bee(N = 175). Grit did not relate positivelyto IQ but was highly correlated with Big FiveConscientiousness. Grit nonetheless demonstrated incrementalpredictive validity of success measures over and beyond IQand conscientiousness. Collectively, these findings suggestthat the achievement of difficult goals entails not onlytalent but also the sustained and focused application oftalent over time. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Personality and Social Psychology American Psychological Association

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References (73)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-3514
eISSN
1939-1315
DOI
10.1037/0022-3514.92.6.1087
pmid
17547490
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The importance of intellectual talent to achievement in allprofessional domains is well established, but less is knownabout other individual differences that predict success. Theauthors tested the importance of 1 noncognitive trait: grit.Defined as perseverance and passion for long-term goals,grit accounted for an average of 4% of the variance insuccess outcomes, including educational attainment among 2samples of adults (N = 1,545 andN = 690), grade point average among IvyLeague undergraduates (N = 138), retentionin 2 classes of United States Military Academy, West Point,cadets (N = 1,218 and N =1,308), and ranking in the National Spelling Bee(N = 175). Grit did not relate positivelyto IQ but was highly correlated with Big FiveConscientiousness. Grit nonetheless demonstrated incrementalpredictive validity of success measures over and beyond IQand conscientiousness. Collectively, these findings suggestthat the achievement of difficult goals entails not onlytalent but also the sustained and focused application oftalent over time.

Journal

Journal of Personality and Social PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jun 1, 2007

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