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Individual differences in integrating information between and within sentences

Individual differences in integrating information between and within sentences Two experiments, with 64 undergraduates, demonstrated that individual differences in working memory capacity affected the probability of resolving apparent inconsistencies within sentences. Resolution was less likely for Ss with small working memories, as assessed by a reading span test that taxed both processing and storage functions. It is suggested that Ss with small spans devoted so many resources to reading processes that they had less capacity for retaining earlier verbatim wording in working memory. Ss with small spans had particular difficulty recovering from inconsistencies when a sentence boundary intervened, which suggests that end-of-sentence processes taxed the poor reader more. Reading times were used to model the time course of integration. Detection and recovery increased processing time. Furthermore, detection was apparent on the first inconsistent word, suggesting that Ss attempted to integrate a word immediately and did not buffer several words before processing them semantically. (62 ref) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition American Psychological Association

Individual differences in integrating information between and within sentences

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References (49)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0278-7393
eISSN
1939-1285
DOI
10.1037/0278-7393.9.4.561
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two experiments, with 64 undergraduates, demonstrated that individual differences in working memory capacity affected the probability of resolving apparent inconsistencies within sentences. Resolution was less likely for Ss with small working memories, as assessed by a reading span test that taxed both processing and storage functions. It is suggested that Ss with small spans devoted so many resources to reading processes that they had less capacity for retaining earlier verbatim wording in working memory. Ss with small spans had particular difficulty recovering from inconsistencies when a sentence boundary intervened, which suggests that end-of-sentence processes taxed the poor reader more. Reading times were used to model the time course of integration. Detection and recovery increased processing time. Furthermore, detection was apparent on the first inconsistent word, suggesting that Ss attempted to integrate a word immediately and did not buffer several words before processing them semantically. (62 ref)

Journal

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and CognitionAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Oct 1, 1983

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