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Is Age-Related Stability of Subjective Well-Being a Paradox? Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Evidence From the Berlin Aging Study

Is Age-Related Stability of Subjective Well-Being a Paradox? Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal... Subjective well-being is thought to remain relatively stable into old age despite health-related losses. Age and functional health constraints were examined as predictors of individual differences and intraindividual change in subjective well-being, as indicated by positive and negative affect, using cross-sectional (N = 516) and longitudinal (N = 203) samples from the Berlin Aging Study (age range 70–103 years). In cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, age and functional health constraints were negatively related to positive affect but unrelated to negative affect. Cross-sectionally, controlling for functional health constraints reversed the direction of the relationship between age and positive affect and produced a negative association between age and negative affect. Findings suggest two qualifications to the average stability of overall subjective well-being: Only some dimensions of subjective well-being remain stable, while others decline; age per se is not a cause of decline in subjective well-being but health constraints are. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology and Aging American Psychological Association

Is Age-Related Stability of Subjective Well-Being a Paradox? Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Evidence From the Berlin Aging Study

Psychology and Aging , Volume 15 (3): 16 – Sep 1, 2000

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0882-7974
eISSN
1939-1498
DOI
10.1037/0882-7974.15.3.511
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Subjective well-being is thought to remain relatively stable into old age despite health-related losses. Age and functional health constraints were examined as predictors of individual differences and intraindividual change in subjective well-being, as indicated by positive and negative affect, using cross-sectional (N = 516) and longitudinal (N = 203) samples from the Berlin Aging Study (age range 70–103 years). In cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, age and functional health constraints were negatively related to positive affect but unrelated to negative affect. Cross-sectionally, controlling for functional health constraints reversed the direction of the relationship between age and positive affect and produced a negative association between age and negative affect. Findings suggest two qualifications to the average stability of overall subjective well-being: Only some dimensions of subjective well-being remain stable, while others decline; age per se is not a cause of decline in subjective well-being but health constraints are.

Journal

Psychology and AgingAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Sep 1, 2000

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