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Job Resources Buffer the Impact of Job Demands on Burnout

Job Resources Buffer the Impact of Job Demands on Burnout This study tested and refined the job demands-resources model, demonstrating that several job resources play a role in buffering the impact of several job demands on burnout. A total of 1,012 employees of a large institute for higher education participated in the study. Four demanding aspects of the job (e.g., work overload, emotional demands) and 4 job resources (e.g., autonomy, performance feedback) were used to test the central hypothesis that the interaction between (high) demands and (low) resources produces the highest levels of burnout (exhaustion, cynicism, reduced professional efficacy). The hypothesis was rejected for (reduced) professional efficacy but confirmed for exhaustion and cynicism regarding 18 out of 32 possible 2-way interactions (i.e., combinations of specific job demands and resources). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Occupational Health Psychology American Psychological Association

Job Resources Buffer the Impact of Job Demands on Burnout

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American Psychological Association
ISSN
1076-8998
eISSN
1939-1307
DOI
10.1037/1076-8998.10.2.170
pmid
15826226
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study tested and refined the job demands-resources model, demonstrating that several job resources play a role in buffering the impact of several job demands on burnout. A total of 1,012 employees of a large institute for higher education participated in the study. Four demanding aspects of the job (e.g., work overload, emotional demands) and 4 job resources (e.g., autonomy, performance feedback) were used to test the central hypothesis that the interaction between (high) demands and (low) resources produces the highest levels of burnout (exhaustion, cynicism, reduced professional efficacy). The hypothesis was rejected for (reduced) professional efficacy but confirmed for exhaustion and cynicism regarding 18 out of 32 possible 2-way interactions (i.e., combinations of specific job demands and resources).

Journal

Journal of Occupational Health PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Apr 1, 2005

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