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Mechanisms Underlying Spontaneous Recovery in Autoshaping

Mechanisms Underlying Spontaneous Recovery in Autoshaping Four experiments used an autoshaping preparation with pigeons to examine the mechanisms underlying spontaneous recovery following extinction training. Experiment 1 served to establish the optimum conditions for studying recovery in autoshaping. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrated that recovery occurs during testing in the middle of a session in the presence of contextual cues uniquely associated with extinction. Such findings are inconsistent with several popular models of extinction. Experiment 4 involved endowing a stimulus with both excitatory and inhibitory properties. Both properties were reduced by extinction training and then recovered after a delay. This result is inconsistent with the notion that extinction training generates inhibitory associations that fade over time. However, it supports the idea that extinction results in a temporary reduction in processing of the conditioned stimulus. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition American Psychological Association

Mechanisms Underlying Spontaneous Recovery in Autoshaping

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References (44)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1990 American Psychological Association
ISSN
2329-8456
eISSN
2329-8464
DOI
10.1037/0097-7403.16.3.235
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Four experiments used an autoshaping preparation with pigeons to examine the mechanisms underlying spontaneous recovery following extinction training. Experiment 1 served to establish the optimum conditions for studying recovery in autoshaping. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrated that recovery occurs during testing in the middle of a session in the presence of contextual cues uniquely associated with extinction. Such findings are inconsistent with several popular models of extinction. Experiment 4 involved endowing a stimulus with both excitatory and inhibitory properties. Both properties were reduced by extinction training and then recovered after a delay. This result is inconsistent with the notion that extinction training generates inhibitory associations that fade over time. However, it supports the idea that extinction results in a temporary reduction in processing of the conditioned stimulus.

Journal

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and CognitionAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jul 1, 1990

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