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Predictors of Posttraumatic Growth Following Bone Marrow Transplantation for Cancer

Predictors of Posttraumatic Growth Following Bone Marrow Transplantation for Cancer There is growing recognition that the experience of cancer can have a positive as well as a negative psychological impact. This longitudinal study sought to identify predictors of posttraumatic growth among cancer patients (N = 72) undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Greater posttraumatic growth in the posttransplant period was related to younger age; less education; greater use of positive reinterpretation, problem solving, and seeking alternative rewards as coping strategies in the pretransplant period; more stressful appraisal of aspects of the transplant experience; and more negatively biased recall of pretransplant levels of psychological distress. Findings partially support J. A. Schaefer and R. H. Moos's (1992) model of life crises and personal growth and also suggest that temporal self-comparisons contribute to the experience of posttraumatic growth. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health Psychology American Psychological Association

Predictors of Posttraumatic Growth Following Bone Marrow Transplantation for Cancer

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0278-6133
eISSN
1930-7810
DOI
10.1037/0278-6133.24.3.266
pmid
15898862
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is growing recognition that the experience of cancer can have a positive as well as a negative psychological impact. This longitudinal study sought to identify predictors of posttraumatic growth among cancer patients (N = 72) undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Greater posttraumatic growth in the posttransplant period was related to younger age; less education; greater use of positive reinterpretation, problem solving, and seeking alternative rewards as coping strategies in the pretransplant period; more stressful appraisal of aspects of the transplant experience; and more negatively biased recall of pretransplant levels of psychological distress. Findings partially support J. A. Schaefer and R. H. Moos's (1992) model of life crises and personal growth and also suggest that temporal self-comparisons contribute to the experience of posttraumatic growth.

Journal

Health PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: May 1, 2005

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