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Recall of thematically relevant material by adolescent good and poor readers as a function of written versus oral presentation

Recall of thematically relevant material by adolescent good and poor readers as a function of... 36 7th grade good and poor readers read one prose passage and listened to a 2nd one. They were tested, following each passage, for comprehension and recall of that passage. Under both reading and listening conditions, good readers recalled a greater proportion of the stories, and the likelihood of their recalling a particular unit was a clear function of the units's structural importance; poor readers recalled less of the stories, and their recall protocols were not as clearly related to variations in structural importance. Performance following reading was significantly correlated with performance following listening. Results indicate that poor readers suffer from a general comprehension deficit and that similar processes are involved in reading and listening comprehension. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Educational Psychology American Psychological Association

Recall of thematically relevant material by adolescent good and poor readers as a function of written versus oral presentation

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-0663
eISSN
1939-2176
DOI
10.1037/0022-0663.69.4.381
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

36 7th grade good and poor readers read one prose passage and listened to a 2nd one. They were tested, following each passage, for comprehension and recall of that passage. Under both reading and listening conditions, good readers recalled a greater proportion of the stories, and the likelihood of their recalling a particular unit was a clear function of the units's structural importance; poor readers recalled less of the stories, and their recall protocols were not as clearly related to variations in structural importance. Performance following reading was significantly correlated with performance following listening. Results indicate that poor readers suffer from a general comprehension deficit and that similar processes are involved in reading and listening comprehension.

Journal

Journal of Educational PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Aug 1, 1977

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