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Retraining of Extinguished Pavlovian Stimuli

Retraining of Extinguished Pavlovian Stimuli Five Pavlovian magazine approach experiments with rat subjects examined the mechanisms by which reconditioning restores extinguished responding. Experiments 1, 2, and 3 found that retraining did not destroy the spontaneous recovery with the passage of time that is characteristic of extinguished stimuli. Experiments 4 and 5 found evidence that retraining after extinction enhanced the strength of the originally trained associations. Together these results suggest that, just as extinction does not destroy original acquisition but superimposes some decremental process, so retraining does not destroy that decremental process but instead superimposes further associative learning. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition American Psychological Association

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 American Psychological Association
ISSN
2329-8456
eISSN
2329-8464
DOI
10.1037/0097-7403.27.2.115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Five Pavlovian magazine approach experiments with rat subjects examined the mechanisms by which reconditioning restores extinguished responding. Experiments 1, 2, and 3 found that retraining did not destroy the spontaneous recovery with the passage of time that is characteristic of extinguished stimuli. Experiments 4 and 5 found evidence that retraining after extinction enhanced the strength of the originally trained associations. Together these results suggest that, just as extinction does not destroy original acquisition but superimposes some decremental process, so retraining does not destroy that decremental process but instead superimposes further associative learning.

Journal

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and CognitionAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Apr 1, 2001

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