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Review of The Psychology of Interrogations, Confessions and Testimony

Review of The Psychology of Interrogations, Confessions and Testimony Journal of Psychophysiology 13 (1999) 126–127 © 1999 Federation of European Psychophysiology Societies JOP 13 (2), 1999, Hogrefe & Huber Boo Publi k Review shers Book Review to claims of coercion that the Police and Criminal Evi- The Psychology of Interrogations, dence (PACE) Act included a requirement for interview Confessions and Testimony with suspects to be tape recorded. Gudjonsson cites evi- dence that this practice may have reduced the number of confessions obtained from those accused of more serious By G. Gudjonsson, Wiley, 1995, 370 pages, ISBN 0-471- crimes. If true it seems to imply that the police were 96177-9, $107.20. previously using the kinds of techniques which might be The author is perhaps uniquely placed to write this book, expected to make some innocent detainees confess. The since he has had careers as a detective and as a clinical book does not mention another effect, observed by this reviewer. Prior to PACE, police interviewers generally psychologist. Dr. Gudjonsson is Icelandic (working in took contemporaneous notes, which made the interroga- Britain) and was a member of the Reykjavik police force; tion process painfully slow and gave the suspect consid- although there are differences between the legal systems erable time http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Psychophysiology American Psychological Association

Review of The Psychology of Interrogations, Confessions and Testimony

Journal of Psychophysiology , Volume 13 (2): 2 – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Federation of European Psychophysiology Societies
ISSN
0269-8803
eISSN
2151-2124
DOI
10.1027//0269-8803.13.2.126
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Psychophysiology 13 (1999) 126–127 © 1999 Federation of European Psychophysiology Societies JOP 13 (2), 1999, Hogrefe & Huber Boo Publi k Review shers Book Review to claims of coercion that the Police and Criminal Evi- The Psychology of Interrogations, dence (PACE) Act included a requirement for interview Confessions and Testimony with suspects to be tape recorded. Gudjonsson cites evi- dence that this practice may have reduced the number of confessions obtained from those accused of more serious By G. Gudjonsson, Wiley, 1995, 370 pages, ISBN 0-471- crimes. If true it seems to imply that the police were 96177-9, $107.20. previously using the kinds of techniques which might be The author is perhaps uniquely placed to write this book, expected to make some innocent detainees confess. The since he has had careers as a detective and as a clinical book does not mention another effect, observed by this reviewer. Prior to PACE, police interviewers generally psychologist. Dr. Gudjonsson is Icelandic (working in took contemporaneous notes, which made the interroga- Britain) and was a member of the Reykjavik police force; tion process painfully slow and gave the suspect consid- although there are differences between the legal systems erable time

Journal

Journal of PsychophysiologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.