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Specializing the Operation of an Explicit Rule

Specializing the Operation of an Explicit Rule The effect of practice on the operative form of a rule was investigated by giving subjects an easy, perfectly predictive classification rule, followed by training in applying that rule to a set of practice items. On a subsequent transfer test, the accuracy and speed of classifying new items was strongly affected by similarity to previously seen items, suggesting that the effect of practice was not simply to automatize the rule. The effect occurred with pictorial, easily integrated stimuli, but not with lists of verbally stated features. Subjects generally did not have insight into the role of previous items in their performance. This dependence on prior episodes may be frequent in ecologically common conditions and is of special interest when the categorization rule becomes uncertain, as when a rule has only heuristic value. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Psychology: General American Psychological Association

Specializing the Operation of an Explicit Rule

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0096-3445
eISSN
1939-2222
DOI
10.1037/0096-3445.120.1.3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The effect of practice on the operative form of a rule was investigated by giving subjects an easy, perfectly predictive classification rule, followed by training in applying that rule to a set of practice items. On a subsequent transfer test, the accuracy and speed of classifying new items was strongly affected by similarity to previously seen items, suggesting that the effect of practice was not simply to automatize the rule. The effect occurred with pictorial, easily integrated stimuli, but not with lists of verbally stated features. Subjects generally did not have insight into the role of previous items in their performance. This dependence on prior episodes may be frequent in ecologically common conditions and is of special interest when the categorization rule becomes uncertain, as when a rule has only heuristic value.

Journal

Journal of Experimental Psychology: GeneralAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Mar 1, 1991

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