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The Importance of a Common In-Group Identity in Ethnically Diverse Groups

The Importance of a Common In-Group Identity in Ethnically Diverse Groups The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a common in-group identity in attenuating the negative effects of ethnic dissimilarity. Specifically, it was hypothesized that a common in-group identity would moderate the relationship between ethnic dissimilarity and satisfaction with coworkers. Data were gathered from 87 persons working in groups. Moderated regression analysis provided support for the hypothesis, in that when a common in-group identity was not present, demographic dissimilarity was related to less satisfaction, but when a common in-group identity was present, there was a positive relationship between ethnic dissimilarity and coworker satisfaction. Further, for ethnically dissimilar persons, coworker satisfaction was higher when a common in-group identity was present than when it was not. Results are discussed in relation to the study's contribution to social psychology and diversity management literature. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice American Psychological Association

The Importance of a Common In-Group Identity in Ethnically Diverse Groups

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References (49)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American Psychological Association
ISSN
1089-2699
eISSN
1930-7802
DOI
10.1037/1089-2699.9.4.251
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a common in-group identity in attenuating the negative effects of ethnic dissimilarity. Specifically, it was hypothesized that a common in-group identity would moderate the relationship between ethnic dissimilarity and satisfaction with coworkers. Data were gathered from 87 persons working in groups. Moderated regression analysis provided support for the hypothesis, in that when a common in-group identity was not present, demographic dissimilarity was related to less satisfaction, but when a common in-group identity was present, there was a positive relationship between ethnic dissimilarity and coworker satisfaction. Further, for ethnically dissimilar persons, coworker satisfaction was higher when a common in-group identity was present than when it was not. Results are discussed in relation to the study's contribution to social psychology and diversity management literature.

Journal

Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and PracticeAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Dec 1, 2005

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