Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“The Very Best of the Millennium”: Longitudinal Research and the Demand-Control-(Support) Model

“The Very Best of the Millennium”: Longitudinal Research and the Demand-Control-(Support) Model This study addressed the methodological quality of longitudinal research examining R. Karasek and T. Theorell's (1990) demand-control-(support) model and reviewed the results of the best of this research. Five criteria for evaluating methodological quality were used: type of design, length of time lags, quality of measures, method of analysis, and nonresponse analysis. These criteria were applied to 45 longitudinal studies, of which 19 (42%) obtained acceptable scores on all criteria. These high-quality studies provided only modest support for the hypothesis that especially the combination of high demands and low control results in high job strain. However, good evidence was found for lagged causal effects of work characteristics, especially for self-reported health or well-being outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Occupational Health Psychology American Psychological Association

“The Very Best of the Millennium”: Longitudinal Research and the Demand-Control-(Support) Model

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-psychological-association/the-very-best-of-the-millennium-longitudinal-research-and-the-demand-aDLumOiFDM

References (83)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 American Psychological Association
ISSN
1076-8998
eISSN
1939-1307
DOI
10.1037/1076-8998.8.4.282
pmid
14570524
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study addressed the methodological quality of longitudinal research examining R. Karasek and T. Theorell's (1990) demand-control-(support) model and reviewed the results of the best of this research. Five criteria for evaluating methodological quality were used: type of design, length of time lags, quality of measures, method of analysis, and nonresponse analysis. These criteria were applied to 45 longitudinal studies, of which 19 (42%) obtained acceptable scores on all criteria. These high-quality studies provided only modest support for the hypothesis that especially the combination of high demands and low control results in high job strain. However, good evidence was found for lagged causal effects of work characteristics, especially for self-reported health or well-being outcomes.

Journal

Journal of Occupational Health PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Oct 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.