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Proton motive force may regulate cell wall-associated enzymes of Bacillus subtilis.

Proton motive force may regulate cell wall-associated enzymes of Bacillus subtilis. Proton motive force may regulate cell wall-associated enzymes of Bacillus subtilis. M A Kemper , M M Urrutia , T J Beveridge , A L Koch and R J Doyle Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Academic Health Center, University of Louisville, Kentucky 40292. ABSTRACT Bacterial metabolism excretes protons during normal metabolic processes. The protons may be recycled by chemiosmosis, diffuse through the wall into the medium, or bind to cell surface constituents. Calculations by Koch (J. Theor. Biol. 120:73-84, 1986) have suggested that the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria may serve as a reservoir of protons during growth and metabolism, causing the wall to have a relatively low pH. That the cell wall may possess a pH lower than the surrounding medium has now been tested in Bacillus subtilis by several independent experiments. When cultures of B. subtilis were treated with the proton conductors azide and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, the cells bound larger amounts of positively charged probes, including the chromium (Cr3+) and uranyl (UO2(2+) ions and were readily agglutinated by cationized ferritin. In contrast, the same proton conductors caused a decrease in the binding of the negatively charged probe chromate (CrO4(2-)). Finally, when levansucrase was induced in cultures by the addition of sucrose, the enzyme was inactive as it traversed the wall during the first 0.7 to 1.0 generation of growth. The composite interpretation of the foregoing observations suggests that the wall is positively charged during metabolism, thereby decreasing its ability to complex with cations while increasing its ability to bind with anions. This may be one reason why some enzymes, such as autolysins, are unable to hydrolyze their substrata until they reach the wall periphery or are in the medium. CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Facebook Google+ Mendeley Reddit StumbleUpon Twitter What's this? « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article J. Bacteriol. September 1993 vol. 175 no. 17 5690-5696 » Abstract PDF Classifications Research Article Services Email this article to a colleague Similar articles in ASM journals Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Alert me to new issues of JB Download to citation manager Reprints and Permissions Copyright Information Books from ASM Press MicrobeWorld Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Kemper, M. A. Articles by Doyle, R. J. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Kemper, M. A. Articles by Doyle, R. J. Related Content Load related web page information Social Bookmarking CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Facebook Google+ Mendeley Reddit StumbleUpon Twitter What's this? current issue December 2011, volume 193, issue 24 Alert me to new issues of JB About JB Subscribers Authors Reviewers Advertisers Inquiries from the Press Permissions & Commercial Reprints ASM Journals Public Access Policy JB RSS Feeds 1752 N Street N.W. • Washington DC 20036 202.737.3600 • 202.942.9355 fax • journals@asmusa.org Print ISSN: 0021-9193 Online ISSN: 1098-5530 Copyright © 2011 by the American Society for Microbiology. For an alternate route to JB .asm.org, visit: http://intl- JB .asm.org | More Info» var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-5821458-9"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Bacteriology American Society For Microbiology

Proton motive force may regulate cell wall-associated enzymes of Bacillus subtilis.

Proton motive force may regulate cell wall-associated enzymes of Bacillus subtilis.

Journal of Bacteriology , Volume 175 (17): 5690 – Sep 1, 1993

Abstract

Proton motive force may regulate cell wall-associated enzymes of Bacillus subtilis. M A Kemper , M M Urrutia , T J Beveridge , A L Koch and R J Doyle Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Academic Health Center, University of Louisville, Kentucky 40292. ABSTRACT Bacterial metabolism excretes protons during normal metabolic processes. The protons may be recycled by chemiosmosis, diffuse through the wall into the medium, or bind to cell surface constituents. Calculations by Koch (J. Theor. Biol. 120:73-84, 1986) have suggested that the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria may serve as a reservoir of protons during growth and metabolism, causing the wall to have a relatively low pH. That the cell wall may possess a pH lower than the surrounding medium has now been tested in Bacillus subtilis by several independent experiments. When cultures of B. subtilis were treated with the proton conductors azide and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, the cells bound larger amounts of positively charged probes, including the chromium (Cr3+) and uranyl (UO2(2+) ions and were readily agglutinated by cationized ferritin. In contrast, the same proton conductors caused a decrease in the binding of the negatively charged probe chromate (CrO4(2-)). Finally, when levansucrase was induced in cultures by the addition of sucrose, the enzyme was inactive as it traversed the wall during the first 0.7 to 1.0 generation of growth. The composite interpretation of the foregoing observations suggests that the wall is positively charged during metabolism, thereby decreasing its ability to complex with cations while increasing its ability to bind with anions. This may be one reason why some enzymes, such as autolysins, are unable to hydrolyze their substrata until they reach the wall periphery or are in the medium. CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Facebook Google+ Mendeley Reddit StumbleUpon Twitter What's this? « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article J. Bacteriol. September 1993 vol. 175 no. 17 5690-5696 » Abstract PDF Classifications Research Article Services Email this article to a colleague Similar articles in ASM journals Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Alert me to new issues of JB Download to citation manager Reprints and Permissions Copyright Information Books from ASM Press MicrobeWorld Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Kemper, M. A. Articles by Doyle, R. J. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Kemper, M. A. Articles by Doyle, R. J. Related Content Load related web page information Social Bookmarking CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Facebook Google+ Mendeley Reddit StumbleUpon Twitter What's this? current issue December 2011, volume 193, issue 24 Alert me to new issues of JB About JB Subscribers Authors Reviewers Advertisers Inquiries from the Press Permissions & Commercial Reprints ASM Journals Public Access Policy JB RSS Feeds 1752 N Street N.W. • Washington DC 20036 202.737.3600 • 202.942.9355 fax • journals@asmusa.org Print ISSN: 0021-9193 Online ISSN: 1098-5530 Copyright © 2011 by the American Society for Microbiology. For an alternate route to JB .asm.org, visit: http://intl- JB .asm.org | More Info» var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-5821458-9"); pageTracker._trackPageview();

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Publisher
American Society For Microbiology
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 by the American society for Microbiology.
ISSN
0021-9193
eISSN
1098-5530
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Proton motive force may regulate cell wall-associated enzymes of Bacillus subtilis. M A Kemper , M M Urrutia , T J Beveridge , A L Koch and R J Doyle Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Academic Health Center, University of Louisville, Kentucky 40292. ABSTRACT Bacterial metabolism excretes protons during normal metabolic processes. The protons may be recycled by chemiosmosis, diffuse through the wall into the medium, or bind to cell surface constituents. Calculations by Koch (J. Theor. Biol. 120:73-84, 1986) have suggested that the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria may serve as a reservoir of protons during growth and metabolism, causing the wall to have a relatively low pH. That the cell wall may possess a pH lower than the surrounding medium has now been tested in Bacillus subtilis by several independent experiments. When cultures of B. subtilis were treated with the proton conductors azide and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, the cells bound larger amounts of positively charged probes, including the chromium (Cr3+) and uranyl (UO2(2+) ions and were readily agglutinated by cationized ferritin. In contrast, the same proton conductors caused a decrease in the binding of the negatively charged probe chromate (CrO4(2-)). Finally, when levansucrase was induced in cultures by the addition of sucrose, the enzyme was inactive as it traversed the wall during the first 0.7 to 1.0 generation of growth. The composite interpretation of the foregoing observations suggests that the wall is positively charged during metabolism, thereby decreasing its ability to complex with cations while increasing its ability to bind with anions. This may be one reason why some enzymes, such as autolysins, are unable to hydrolyze their substrata until they reach the wall periphery or are in the medium. CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Facebook Google+ Mendeley Reddit StumbleUpon Twitter What's this? « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article J. Bacteriol. September 1993 vol. 175 no. 17 5690-5696 » Abstract PDF Classifications Research Article Services Email this article to a colleague Similar articles in ASM journals Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Alert me to new issues of JB Download to citation manager Reprints and Permissions Copyright Information Books from ASM Press MicrobeWorld Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Citing articles via Google Scholar Google Scholar Articles by Kemper, M. A. Articles by Doyle, R. J. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Kemper, M. A. Articles by Doyle, R. J. Related Content Load related web page information Social Bookmarking CiteULike Connotea Delicious Digg Facebook Google+ Mendeley Reddit StumbleUpon Twitter What's this? current issue December 2011, volume 193, issue 24 Alert me to new issues of JB About JB Subscribers Authors Reviewers Advertisers Inquiries from the Press Permissions & Commercial Reprints ASM Journals Public Access Policy JB RSS Feeds 1752 N Street N.W. • Washington DC 20036 202.737.3600 • 202.942.9355 fax • journals@asmusa.org Print ISSN: 0021-9193 Online ISSN: 1098-5530 Copyright © 2011 by the American Society for Microbiology. For an alternate route to JB .asm.org, visit: http://intl- JB .asm.org | More Info» var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-5821458-9"); pageTracker._trackPageview();

Journal

Journal of BacteriologyAmerican Society For Microbiology

Published: Sep 1, 1993

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