Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

E THICS AND I NTERNATIONAL B USINESS

E THICS AND I NTERNATIONAL B USINESS ▪ Abstract The activities of oil and other energy companies are increasingly being challenged by nongovernmental organizations and media to justify their behavior in ethical terms. Activities that visibly damage the environment have long been challenged by advocacy groups. In recent years public interest has broadened into calls to respect “sustainability,” human rights, and other ethical imperatives. This article attempts to set these developments in the context of international promotion of the idea of a global “civil society.” Ethical codes reach, by persuasion, beyond coercive legal obligations. They have the character and role of “repeated games.” Codes of behavior for business are rooted in national and cultural values, which may conflict at the international level. However, many governments following the lead of the United States are often developing sanctions to promote ethical behavior by businesses, to redress the failure of markets to manage common access to resources and to protect aspects of the natural world for its own sake. Examples are efforts to uphold human rights, fight against corruption, and promote sustainability of resources. Business leaders and the nongovernment organizations that advocate international values on these subjects have the opportunity to contribute to the development of global civil society by working together to establish persuasive codes that do not require slow and difficult international intervention by government. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Environment and Resources Annual Reviews

E THICS AND I NTERNATIONAL B USINESS

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/e-thics-and-i-nternational-b-usiness-oGBuca2t8l
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1543-5938
DOI
10.1146/annurev.energy.24.1.83
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

▪ Abstract The activities of oil and other energy companies are increasingly being challenged by nongovernmental organizations and media to justify their behavior in ethical terms. Activities that visibly damage the environment have long been challenged by advocacy groups. In recent years public interest has broadened into calls to respect “sustainability,” human rights, and other ethical imperatives. This article attempts to set these developments in the context of international promotion of the idea of a global “civil society.” Ethical codes reach, by persuasion, beyond coercive legal obligations. They have the character and role of “repeated games.” Codes of behavior for business are rooted in national and cultural values, which may conflict at the international level. However, many governments following the lead of the United States are often developing sanctions to promote ethical behavior by businesses, to redress the failure of markets to manage common access to resources and to protect aspects of the natural world for its own sake. Examples are efforts to uphold human rights, fight against corruption, and promote sustainability of resources. Business leaders and the nongovernment organizations that advocate international values on these subjects have the opportunity to contribute to the development of global civil society by working together to establish persuasive codes that do not require slow and difficult international intervention by government.

Journal

Annual Review of Environment and ResourcesAnnual Reviews

Published: Nov 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.