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Insect Territoriality

Insect Territoriality Territoriality must be one of the most frequently defined terms in the biological dictionary. Each new author in tum seems able to find a fresh nuance to the word that can be emphasized by some novel twist of definition . General acceptance that territoriality exists when animals defend resources against others of the same or other species becomes confused in the face of detail, largely because it is not always clear what constitutes defense nor even what constitutes a resource. Although most authors persist with some variation on the "defense of resource" theme (e.g. 11, 21, 22, 87), others prefer to define territoriality in terms of whether animals are spaced out more than expected from a random occupation of suitable habitats (e g. 37). The former definition focuses attention on the behavior of the animals concerned, the latter on the ecological consequences of this behavior. In this review, I persist with the "defense of resource" approach, concentrate on trying to understand the behavior of the territorial individual or group, and assume that the ecological dispersion that results is the unselected conse­ quence of the behavior. In the past, the study of territoriality has been dominated by those biologists http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Entomology Annual Reviews

Insect Territoriality

Annual Review of Entomology , Volume 28 (1) – Jan 1, 1983

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1983 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4170
eISSN
1545-4487
DOI
10.1146/annurev.en.28.010183.000433
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Territoriality must be one of the most frequently defined terms in the biological dictionary. Each new author in tum seems able to find a fresh nuance to the word that can be emphasized by some novel twist of definition . General acceptance that territoriality exists when animals defend resources against others of the same or other species becomes confused in the face of detail, largely because it is not always clear what constitutes defense nor even what constitutes a resource. Although most authors persist with some variation on the "defense of resource" theme (e.g. 11, 21, 22, 87), others prefer to define territoriality in terms of whether animals are spaced out more than expected from a random occupation of suitable habitats (e g. 37). The former definition focuses attention on the behavior of the animals concerned, the latter on the ecological consequences of this behavior. In this review, I persist with the "defense of resource" approach, concentrate on trying to understand the behavior of the territorial individual or group, and assume that the ecological dispersion that results is the unselected conse­ quence of the behavior. In the past, the study of territoriality has been dominated by those biologists

Journal

Annual Review of EntomologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jan 1, 1983

There are no references for this article.