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Pharmacology of Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone

Pharmacology of Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was identified as L-pyroglutamyl-L­ histidyl-L-proline amide in 1973, and its eventual synthesis enabled researchers to investigate its physiological and pharmacological properties. During the past ten years it has become clear that TRH and its receptors are ubiquitously distributed in the central nervous system (eNS) as well as in several peripheral organs. Studies in which TRH was administered to experimental animals have revealed some intriguing and potentially important clinical actions, most o f which are unrelated to its thyrotropin-releasing property. In fact, this property in some instances is looked upon as a side effect, and attempts have been made to synthesize analogues that retain the central, but not the thyrotropin-releasing, properties of TRH (1, 2). Because of space considerations, the scope of this review has been limited to selected aspects of the pharmacology of TRH. The review of the literature has also been selective and is devoted mostly to papers published after 1982. For a more comprehensive background on the extrapituitary properties of TRH the reader is referred to several earlier publications (3-7). TRH RECEPTORS The first studies of extrapituitary TRH binding sites were made as early as 1975 (8), but the lack of a ligand http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology Annual Reviews

Pharmacology of Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1986 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0362-1642
eISSN
1545-4304
DOI
10.1146/annurev.pa.26.040186.001523
pmid
2872853
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was identified as L-pyroglutamyl-L­ histidyl-L-proline amide in 1973, and its eventual synthesis enabled researchers to investigate its physiological and pharmacological properties. During the past ten years it has become clear that TRH and its receptors are ubiquitously distributed in the central nervous system (eNS) as well as in several peripheral organs. Studies in which TRH was administered to experimental animals have revealed some intriguing and potentially important clinical actions, most o f which are unrelated to its thyrotropin-releasing property. In fact, this property in some instances is looked upon as a side effect, and attempts have been made to synthesize analogues that retain the central, but not the thyrotropin-releasing, properties of TRH (1, 2). Because of space considerations, the scope of this review has been limited to selected aspects of the pharmacology of TRH. The review of the literature has also been selective and is devoted mostly to papers published after 1982. For a more comprehensive background on the extrapituitary properties of TRH the reader is referred to several earlier publications (3-7). TRH RECEPTORS The first studies of extrapituitary TRH binding sites were made as early as 1975 (8), but the lack of a ligand

Journal

Annual Review of Pharmacology and ToxicologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Apr 1, 1986

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