Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Role of Cellular Design in Bacterial Metal Accumulation and Mineralization

Role of Cellular Design in Bacterial Metal Accumulation and Mineralization We have long been aware of the necessity of microorganisms in the global cycling of biologically important elements. Knowledge of microbial carbon fixation, gaseous oxygen generation, and nitrogen and su lfur cycling is ingraincd in our awareness and represents a substantial, established com­ ponent of academic teaching programs. Microbial biomineralizaton, or the 0066-4227/89/1001-0147$02.00 BEVERIDGE formation of minerals by microorganisms, is another important activity of microbes which is just now being defined; its scope is much larger than initially thought, since it involves metals and minerals of tremendous range and kind. Intuitively, the age and ubiquity of prokaryotes suggests that biomineralization has global consequences and has helped mold the Earth. Microbiology is the study of the attributes,processes,and consequences of a wide spectrum of eukaryotic and prokaryotic life forms. The accumulation of metals and development of minerals impinges on several of these aspects. Space limitation for this review requires me to neglect entirely eukaryotic microorganisms and restrict myself to prokaryotic forms. I recommend a 1989 book (88a) based on a Society for General Microbiology symposium, Metal­ Microbe Interactions, for recent articles dealing with eukaryotic cells,such as yeasts, as well as prokaryotes. The potency of metal binding to eukaryotic microbes such http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Microbiology Annual Reviews

Role of Cellular Design in Bacterial Metal Accumulation and Mineralization

Annual Review of Microbiology , Volume 43 (1) – Oct 1, 1989

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/role-of-cellular-design-in-bacterial-metal-accumulation-and-emq0MPY9l7

References (35)

Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1989 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4227
eISSN
1545-3251
DOI
10.1146/annurev.mi.43.100189.001051
pmid
2679352
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We have long been aware of the necessity of microorganisms in the global cycling of biologically important elements. Knowledge of microbial carbon fixation, gaseous oxygen generation, and nitrogen and su lfur cycling is ingraincd in our awareness and represents a substantial, established com­ ponent of academic teaching programs. Microbial biomineralizaton, or the 0066-4227/89/1001-0147$02.00 BEVERIDGE formation of minerals by microorganisms, is another important activity of microbes which is just now being defined; its scope is much larger than initially thought, since it involves metals and minerals of tremendous range and kind. Intuitively, the age and ubiquity of prokaryotes suggests that biomineralization has global consequences and has helped mold the Earth. Microbiology is the study of the attributes,processes,and consequences of a wide spectrum of eukaryotic and prokaryotic life forms. The accumulation of metals and development of minerals impinges on several of these aspects. Space limitation for this review requires me to neglect entirely eukaryotic microorganisms and restrict myself to prokaryotic forms. I recommend a 1989 book (88a) based on a Society for General Microbiology symposium, Metal­ Microbe Interactions, for recent articles dealing with eukaryotic cells,such as yeasts, as well as prokaryotes. The potency of metal binding to eukaryotic microbes such

Journal

Annual Review of MicrobiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Oct 1, 1989

There are no references for this article.