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To the Malaria Circumsporozoite Protein: An Immunological Approach to Vaccine Development

To the Malaria Circumsporozoite Protein: An Immunological Approach to Vaccine Development An effective malarial vaccine would save the lives of over one million children annually and reduce the suffering of hundreds of millions of children and adults in tropical countries throughout the world (I). At present, there is no vaccine against any human parasitic disease, yet vac­ cines against other pathogens have had an enormous impact on public health. While laboratory animals can be successfully vaccinated against malaria using crude parasite antigens (reviewed in 2), such an approach is not feasible for humans because of the impracticality of large-scale culture (3) and the cost and associated risks of using blood- or serum-derived products in a human vaccine. Unless such problems can be overcome, malaria vaccines suitable for human use will have to be produced using recombinant DNA or synthetic peptide technology. Indeed, candidate recombinant (4,5) and synthetic (6,7) vaccines have already been tested in humans and nonhuman primates; although results have been encouraging, these human vaccines (5, 7) to date have had a limited efficacy. These I The US Government has the right to retain a nonexclusive, royalty-free license in and to any copyright covering this paper. GOOD, BERZOFSKY & MILLER vaccines, which contain a limited amount of parasite http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Immunology Annual Reviews

To the Malaria Circumsporozoite Protein: An Immunological Approach to Vaccine Development

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1988 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0732-0582
eISSN
1545-3278
DOI
10.1146/annurev.iy.06.040188.003311
pmid
2968085
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An effective malarial vaccine would save the lives of over one million children annually and reduce the suffering of hundreds of millions of children and adults in tropical countries throughout the world (I). At present, there is no vaccine against any human parasitic disease, yet vac­ cines against other pathogens have had an enormous impact on public health. While laboratory animals can be successfully vaccinated against malaria using crude parasite antigens (reviewed in 2), such an approach is not feasible for humans because of the impracticality of large-scale culture (3) and the cost and associated risks of using blood- or serum-derived products in a human vaccine. Unless such problems can be overcome, malaria vaccines suitable for human use will have to be produced using recombinant DNA or synthetic peptide technology. Indeed, candidate recombinant (4,5) and synthetic (6,7) vaccines have already been tested in humans and nonhuman primates; although results have been encouraging, these human vaccines (5, 7) to date have had a limited efficacy. These I The US Government has the right to retain a nonexclusive, royalty-free license in and to any copyright covering this paper. GOOD, BERZOFSKY & MILLER vaccines, which contain a limited amount of parasite

Journal

Annual Review of ImmunologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Apr 1, 1988

There are no references for this article.