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Automated crater detection on Mars using deep learning

Automated crater detection on Mars using deep learning Impact crater cataloging is an important tool in the study of the geological history of planetary bodies in the Solar System, including dating of surface features and geologic mapping of surface processes. Catalogs of impact craters have been created by a diverse set of methods over many decades, including using visible or near infra-red imagery and digital terrain models. I present an automated system for crater detection and cataloging using a digital terrain model (DTM) of Mars | In the algorithm craters are rst identi ed as rings or disks on samples of the DTM image using a convolutional neural network with a UNET architecture, and the location and size of the features are determined using a circle matching algorithm. I describe the crater detection algorithm (CDA) and compare its performance relative to an existing crater dataset. I further examine craters missed by the CDA as well as potential new craters found by the algorithm. I show that the CDA can nd three{quarters of the resolvable craters in the Mars DTMs, with a median di erence of 5-10% in crater diameter compared to an existing database. A version of this CDA has been used to process DTM data from the Moon and Mercury (Silburt et al., 2019). The source code for the complete CDA is available at https://github.com/silburt/DeepMoon, and Martian crater datasets generated using this CDA are available at https://doi.org/10.5683/SP2/MDKPC8. Keywords: Mars craters, Digital Terrain Model, Deep Learning, Convolutional Neural Network 1. Introduction the crater features. An important bene t of these CDAs is that it becomes possible to automate large parts of the Information on crater populations and spatial distribu- crater{ nding process and reduces the e ort required after tions provide important constraints on the geological his- the initial implementation. tory of planetary surfaces. Regional di erences in crater Automated CDAs have tunable parameters that can be distributions and population characteristics can be used optimized for the imagery or elevation dataset being pro- to constrain geologic processes and stratigraphy (Cintala cessed. In designing the algorithms, a curated list of crater et al., 1976; Wise and Minksowski, 1980; Barlow and Perez, locations and images are used in a \training" step to adjust 2003; Barlow, 2005), and crater populations can be used to these parameters. Once trained, the CDA can be applied estimate the age of surface features as well as constrain the to larger datasets from the same body or even applied to timescale of surface processes (Arvidson, 1974; Soderblom di erent planetary bodies through transfer learning (Sil- et al., 1974; Craddock et al., 1997; Stepinski and Urbach, burt et al., 2019). 2009; Tanaka et al., 2014). To enable such research, im- In this work, I use an automated CDA based on a Con- pact craters need to be identi ed, measured, and counted volutional Neural Network (CNN, Goodfellow et al., 2016) using imagery of a planet's surface. to identify circular crater{like features in a martian Dig- However, the task of creating a dataset of crater lo- ital Terrain Model (DTM). I perform three experiments cations has traditionally been a time{consuming process with the CDA to characterize its performance on the DTM of manually identifying craters in printed maps (Barlow, under various assumptions. In two of the experiments, I 1988) or digital imagery (Robbins and Hynek, 2012). Re- attempt to nd rings associated with the crater rims as cent advances in the quality of remote observations, in in Silburt et al. (2019) using CNNs trained on lunar data image processing techniques, and available computational (the Silburt et al. (2019) CDA) and martian data. In the power have lead to the development of advanced auto- third experiment, I train the CNN to nd disk structures mated Crater Detection Algorithms (CDAs, e.g., Stepinski associated with the entire crater. The latter method is et al., 2009; Di et al., 2014; Pedrosa et al., 2017; Silburt commonly used in image segmentation methods to iso- et al., 2019). These CDAs use di erent approaches and late features (e.g., cancerous cells in medical images, Ron- datasets, but each method attempts to identify crater{like neberger et al. (2015)) and a similar method was developed features on the surface using digital imagery or elevation by Stepinski et al. (2009). datasets and apply image processing techniques to isolate Preprint submitted to Elsevier April 18, 2019 arXiv:1904.07991v1 [astro-ph.EP] 16 Apr 2019 The CNN used in this work uses a standard \UNET" tiple automated CDAs in a weighted `voting' algorithm architecture (Ronneberger et al., 2015) that is commonly (based on skill, as is done for human classi ers Robbins used in image segmentation and processing, and similar (2017)) to provide a more robust automated method for CNNs have been applied to identi cation of tumors in cataloging craters. medical images (C  i cek et al., 2016), identi cation of radio frequency interference in astronomical data (Akeret et al., 2. Prior Work 2017), and crater detection on the Moon using a DTM from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (Silburt et al., One of the rst large global databases for Mars was cre- 2019). The architecture of the CNN is not the primary ated by Barlow (1988) using printed maps from Viking or- purpose of this work, and the reader is referred to the biters and included 25,826 craters with a diameter greater referenced work for an in{depth discussion of the method- than 8km. This dataset has been updated since then ology. (Barlow, 2003) with 42,283 craters, and other datasets The remainder of this paper is organized as follows: are available (Rodionova et al. (2000) with 19,308 craters, in section 2 I review prior work in developing automated Salamuni ccar and Lon cari c (2008) with 57,633 craters). CDAs; in section 3 I describe the crater detection algo- The most comprehensive dataset for Mars craters is that rithm, the training and data processing involved, and the derived from the Thermal Emission Imaging System in- structure of the experiments; in section 4 I discuss the strument by Robbins and Hynek (2012). The Robbins metrics calculated for each experiment and examine the and Hynek (2012) dataset includes 383,343 craters with di- new crater catalogs in detail; nally, in section 5 I provide ameters greater than 1km, including 30,473 craters above concluding remarks. 8km diameter. These craters were identi ed in 256 pixel/- The software used to make CDA described here is based degree resolution THEMIS IR imagery using a customized on the work of Silburt et al. (2019) with three modi ca- manual image processing pipeline. The Robbins and Hynek tions: The source data used here retains the 16{bit raw (2012) dataset is reported to be statistically complete to precision of the source DTM compared to 8{bit image used 1km diameter for the majority of Mars covered by the in Silburt et al. (2019); a disk{ nding CNN is implemented source THEMIS dataset, re ected in the power law dis- with an additional processing step, discussed later; the dis- tribution following the expected distribution to diameters tance and size thresholds used to determine duplicates and of 1km or lower (Arvidson et al., 1979). In this work, I matches in the database were reduced to 0.25 of the crater consider craters with a diameter greater than 4km based diameter (from 2.6 and 1.8 diameter units). on the resolution limit of the input DTM. The original code is available at https://github.com/ In contrast to the attempts to catalog martian craters silburt/DeepMoon.git , updates and modi cations to using manual methods, automated CDAs have not been the code can be found at https://github.com/eelsirhc/ extensively used to generate global catalogs of martian DeepMars.git . The catalogs generated here, along with craters, but have been used to catalog small test areas ancillary data, can be found at https://doi.org/10.5683/ containing a mixture of crater types. Two common met- SP2/MDKPC8. Similarly to Silburt et al. (2019), I use Keras rics used in machine learning comparisons are precision (Chollet, 2015) version 2 with Tensor ow (Abadi et al., and recall, whose mathematical de nitions are given in the 2016) to build, train, and test the model. In training the next section. Precision is the fraction of craters found by model I used an Nvidia 1080 Ti GPU using the CUDA the CDA that exist in a target dataset (usually a subset and CUDNN support libraries, but the code is compatible of Barlow (1988) or Robbins and Hynek (2012)), and the with Intel and AMD CPUs. recall is the fraction of craters in the target dataset that In the results presented here, no manual corrections are found by the CDA. In the calculation of precision, the have been applied to the generated catalogs to improve e ect of detected craters that are real, but do not exist in the accuracy of the crater catalog. As a result, the CDAs the target dataset, is to decrease the precision. miss around 25% of the craters in the Robbins and Hynek Stepinski et al. (2009) developed the AutoCrat CDA (2012) dataset, and nd an additional 25% that do not using the 128pixels/degree DTM from the Mars Orbiting match craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012). These Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument. The AutoCrat CDA numbers are signi cantly better than previous automated combines a \rule-based" module that applies gradient{ algorithms (e.g., Stepinski et al., 2011)) and worse than based algorithms to identify local depressions as possible current alternative crater catalogs created by expert hu- craters, followed by a \machine-learning" module that ap- man classi ers (Salamuni ccar et al., 2012). While it would plies a decision tree algorithm (Witten and Frank, 2005) be possible to manually inspect the roughly 15,000 `new' to determine whether the feature is a crater or not. The crater candidates, or add the roughly 15,000 missed craters decision tree algorithm is used to di erentiate craters from to the new catalog, that would not lead to an improvement non{crater depressions using diameter, depth, and shape in the performance of the CDA on observations that have parameters as factors. Only a small fraction of the planet not been studied by expert human classi ers. The better is covered in Stepinski et al. (2009), with a reported preci- approach to improving the CDA on unseen data, tested sion of 42% (1,544 known craters out of 3,666 detections) here and in Lee (2018), is to combine the results from mul- and a recall of 72% (1,544 out of 2,144 known craters 2 were found). A global database generated using this CDA the High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC, Jaumann was reported in Stepinski and Urbach (2009) with 75,919 et al., 2007) aboard Mars Express. The stated scale of craters larger than 1.37km. the dataset is 200m/pixel horizontally, chosen as a com- Di et al. (2014) developed a CDA that also processed promise between the 463m/pixel scale of MOLA and the DTM images. Their CDA uses a sliding window correla- 50m/pixel scale of HRSC. However, the HRSC DTMs that tor to nd and highlight crater edge features and a circu- were included cover only 44% of the planet, so more than lar Hough transform to transform those highlighted crater half of the planet is interpolated from MOLA dataset at edges into locations and sizes. Di et al. (2014) reports on 463m/pixel scale. Some regions have no data from either the CDA performance for three sites with 11,868 craters, spacecraft. The stated accuracy of each point is 100m hor- but they do not provide an explicit calculation of precision izontally and at best 1m radially (Fergason et al., 2018). and recall. Di et al. (2014) reports nding 934 craters in The total image size of the DTM is 106694  53347 pix- total, with 114 false positives (a precision of 87%) with a els with 16{bit resolution for the elevation data, using a recall rate using the same data (their table 2) of 74% for simple cylindrical (Plate Carr ee) projection. The e ective 1 1 th craters with a diameter greater than 6km, but a recall rate resolution of this source image is of a degree, and 296 2 of less than 10% for all craters tested. m vertically (better than the resolution of the input data). Pedrosa et al. (2017) developed a CDA using thermal The CDA takes as input a 256  256 pixel 8{bit im- imagery from THEMIS. The CDA processes THEMIS IR age taken from the larger DTM and attempts to identify imagery by rst identifying geophysical depressions using craters within this image. To prepare an image for use a `watershed' transform (to nd virtual oodplains) and with the CDA I use the following steps: then within each watershed identi ed the local minima 1. A square sample is extracted from the DTM and as possible craters. A circle template matching algorithm resampled into the required 256  256 size. is then used to compare the crater features to a charac- 2. The bit resolution of the image is rescaled from the teristic ring representing the crater rim. Pedrosa et al. 16{bit source to the 8{bit resolution required for the (2017) reports a precision and recall of 65% and 91%, re- CDA. This step occurs after resampling the image spectively (their gure 7), compared to a target dataset to a smaller region to mitigate the e ect of the large of 3,600 craters. The template matching system employed altitude variation on Mars. by Pedrosa et al. (2017) is similar to the method used in 3. The image is orthographically projected using the Silburt et al. (2019) and here to nd the location of each Cartopy Python package (Met Oce, 2018) to pro- crater. vide an image with near{constant linear scale instead Salamuni ccar et al. (2011) provides a summary of many of the constant angular resolution of the Plate Carre more automated CDAs, and a discussion of the e ect of projection. combining multiple CDAs into one dataset. The various methods used in the CDAs are essentially the same as the 4. Padding is added to the image as required to ll in CDA developed here. A correlation function is used to the square image after projection. The Orthograph- identify features that identify a crater | edges in Di et al. ically projected image always occupies fewer pixels (2014), disks in Stepinski et al. (2009), opposing crescents than the Plate Carre source image. in Pedrosa et al. (2017). Once the crater is identi ed a The size of the image sample (step 1) is chosen from a circle nding algorithm is used to determine the location list of sizes from 512 to 16,384 pixels to provide a range of and size | a Hough transform in Di et al. (2014), a slid- scales from 400m/pixel to 12.8km/pixel. The full dataset ing window correlator in Pedrosa et al. (2017). In the is constructed by sampling the entire planet at a range of CDA developed here, discussed in detail in the next sec- pixel scales and with overlapping regions between adjacent tion, the CNN implements a sequence of correlation func- images, requiring 55,000 images in total. I also tested an tions to identify and highlight the crater, followed by a additional 150,000 images sampled at the original scale of circle matching algorithm to determine the location of the the DTM (200m/pixel), but the performance of the CDA craters. degrades substantially because of the coarser scale of the majority of the input DTM. An alternate method used by 3. Methods Silburt et al. (2019) was to select the location and size of the images at random, which provides similar statistical 3.1. Input dataset results to the systematic method above, but would not The source digital terrain model (DTM) for this work guarantee planet-wide coverage. is the Mars HRSC MOLA Blended DEM Global 200m v2 In the current implementation of the CNN each image (Fergason et al., 2018) dataset available from the Astroge- takes 0.5Mbit of storage, but this is not the limiting fac- ology Science Center website (https://astrogeology.usgs.gov). tor in the algorithm. Each instance of the UNET CNN This map is a blend of digital terrain models derived from requires storing 10 million parameters (the connections the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA, Smith et al., between each layer) and uses 600MB of storage. During 2001) aboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, and training 16 images are simultaneously processed requiring 3 9.6GB of memory. At this scale, a consumer video card Figure 1{right super-poses the input DTM image with (Nvidia 1080 Ti) is approximately an order of magnitude the known craters (Robbins and Hynek, 2012) in red and faster than a 32 core Intel Xeon workstation with 192GB of craters found by the ring nding Mars{trained CDA in memory. Further, the GPU is optimized for 8{bit integer blue. In this image overlapping blue and red circles iden- operations compared to 16{bit oating point operations, tify craters correctly identi ed by the CNN (though some and can process an 8{bit image up to 200 faster than the are displaced spatially), red circles with no blue counter- equivalent 16{bit image. part are missed craters (false negatives in machine learning The source crater catalog for this work is the Robbins terminology), while blue circles with no red counterpart and Hynek (2012) catalog, with 383,343 craters larger than are features incorrectly identi ed as craters by the CNN 1km in diameter. To mitigate problems with the resolution (false positives ). In principle, the false positives might be of the DTM (discussed above) and possible problems with new craters, but I will suggest later that the majority are craters smaller than 2km in diameter from the Robbins not new craters, although some are genuine circular fea- and Hynek (2012) catalog (Robbins, 2017) I include only tures (e.g., paterae). The rightmost panel of gure 1 has craters larger than 4km in diameter in this work. a strict 4{pixel diameter cuto such that craters might be removed from one catalog and not the other, appearing as 3.2. Experiments false positives (only blue circles) or false negatives/missed I performed three experiments with the CDA. The rst craters (only red circles) even if a matching smaller crater experiment uses a CNN trained on Lunar data (Silburt exists. et al., 2019) to nd ring structures associated with the For the CNN trained with martian craters, I use 30,000 crater rim. This CNN has not been previously trained images distributed in location and scale in the training on Mars crater observations and is an example of transfer dataset (5,000 images were reserved for a testing stage learning. during the training), and 25,000 images in the validation The second experiment modi es the rst by training dataset. The images are distributed geographically so that the CNN using a subset of the Mars crater imagery without both datasets contain unique images but similar spatial using the previously Moon trained CNN. The target data distributions. The image extents are also distributed be- for the training is derived from a human{generated crater tween datasets, with similar numbers of each scale in each database (Robbins and Hynek, 2012) using high{resolution dataset. The small number of large geographically ex- infra{red imagery. In the second experiment, the CNN is tended images (fewer than 500) means they are unevenly trained to identify rings associated with the rims of craters, distributed between the two datasets. and a summary of the training method is provided in the A single iteration of the training uses all 20,000 train- next subsection. ing images and measures the accuracy of the updated CNN In the third experiment, the CNN is modi ed to iden- using the 5,000 reserved test images. This training is re- tify disks associated with craters, instead of rings. This peated until the test accuracy stops improving, or after 30 approach follows the same training methodology as the iterations. In Silburt et al. (2019), the CNN was trained ring nding CNN, but with a modi ed training dataset with 30,000 images of the Moon for 4 complete iterations and crater matching algorithm. To keep the compari- (120,000 images in total). For the Mars trained CNN son as close as possible I use the same image locations the test accuracy stopped improving after 8{10 iterations for both trained CNNs, and in the disk nding CDA I (200,000 to 250,000 images). The di erence in total num- convert crater features highlighted by the CNN to ring ber of images used does not necessarily translate to an structures before attempting to locate the craters. This improved CDA | The largest improvements occur early disk{ring conversion makes comparison easier between the in the training process, and Silburt et al. (2019) also used CNNs but is not necessarily an optimized algorithm for a larger 30,000 image test dataset that would have smaller the disk nding CDA. statistical uctuations in the accuracy metrics. The CNN does not produce a location or size for each 3.3. Training and Validation crater in the image but instead transforms the DTM image Training and validation follows the method outlined in into a binary image that highlights topographic features Silburt et al. (2019), and an example is given in gure 1. A that are related to craters. The CNN is best at highlight- sample image is taken from the dataset ( gure 1{left) and ing features that are between 10 and 60 pixels in diameter the locations of resolvable known craters are taken from in any particular image, resulting in a large number of the Robbins and Hynek (2012) and drawn as white pixels missing craters in each image. Small craters are repre- on an otherwise black `image' ( gure 1{center). The CNN sented by too few pixels to be positively identi ed. Large is then trained by exposure to a large number of images craters become di use or incomplete circles fall below the and trained to encode the DTM into the binary ring image detection threshold. In gure 1, Gale crater was among ( gure 1{center). Figure 1 is one of the 15 images in the the largest identi ed features, even though a few larger dataset that includes a majority of Gale crater in the image craters are visible in the image. { this gure is centered on 137 degrees east longitude, 8 degrees south longitude, at 3.2km/pixel scale. 4 Mars DEM Target DEM and craters -3 -3 -3 -6 -6 -6 -9 -9 -9 -12 -12 -12 -14 -14 -14 -17 -17 -17 131 134 136 139 142 145 131 134 136 139 142 145 131 134 136 139 142 145 Longitude Longitude Longitude Figure 1: Example DTM image (left),target map (center), and identi ed craters (right). The DTM is extracted from the source HRSC+MOLA map at 137E longitude, 8S latitude with a resolution of 18 pixels per degree (approximately 3.2 km/pixel). Gale crater is located at the center{top of the image, and is found by the CNN in this example. The right panel has a 4 pixel diameter cuto and craters near this threshold might appear in one catalog but not the other simply because of this strict cuto . Red circles show craters from the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset, blue circles show craters found by the CDA. 3.4. CNN Processing each image by identifying craters that are within 0.25 di- ameter units in size and within 0.25 diameter units in lo- The location and size of the craters in the CNN images cation of another crater. These values are smaller than are determined using the match template algorithm from those used by Silburt et al. (2019). scikit-image (van der Walt et al., 2014). The match template The result of this post-processing is a list of unique algorithm nds the location and size of each circular fea- craters found in each input image, before any comparison ture by maximizing its correlation with a template cir- with the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. In the right cle of known size. To allow comparison with the Silburt panel of gure 1 this post-processing produced the blue et al. (2019) study I keep the same threshold parameters circles, while the Robbins and Hynek (2012) craters with for the circle matching algorithm, though small improve- a diameter of at least 4 pixels are shown as red circles. ments may be possible with more extensive re{training of The disk{ nding CNN is trained to highlight craters the algorithm. For each crater map generated by the CNN by replacing the crater in the DTM with a solid disk in the location and size of craters are found with the following the binary image, instead of a ring surrounding the crater. steps: After the disk CNN has processed the DTM scene a Sobel 1. A candidate circle size is chosen and used to generate and Feldman (1968) transform is used to convert this disk a template image. into a ring to emulate the output of the ring{ nding CNN. 2. The candidate circle is compared against all loca- After this additional step, the analysis follows the ring tions in the binary crater image generated by the nding method above. CNN. The resulting map becomes a \heat map" of A potential downside of the disk nding method is correlation between the candidate circle and the tem- that overlapping craters are not easily separated. Over- plate. lapping craters found by the disk nding CNN are typ- ically represented as non circular features and therefore 3. Where the correlation between the crater map and are rejected by the circle matching algorithm. One possi- the candidate circle exceeds a con dence threshold ble improvement used by Stepinski et al. (2009) is to use a that location is identi ed as the crater location and pre{processing step to lter the images for preferred length the size of the candidate circle is used as a crater scales using a Gaussian blurring technique, this would bet- size. ter separate large and small craters regardless of their over- This template matching process is conducted for circles lap, but would not separate similarly sized overlapping with integer radii from 5 pixels to 40 pixels. For architec- craters. The disk nding algorithm is not recommended tural reasons the CNN rarely predicts craters smaller than as the only CDA for this reason. 10 pixels in diameter or larger than 60 pixels, with typical minimum and maximum diameters of 10 pixels and 30 pix- 3.5. Post Processing els, respectively. The circle matching algorithm performs The image dataset contains 55,000 images with reso- poorly for circles with a diameter smaller than 10 pixels lutions ranging from 150 pixels/degree to 4 pixels/degree where it considers di use segments of larger craters as po- covering the planet. As a result, a single location would tential small craters, resulting in 'rings' of small craters appear at up to 7 di erent resolutions in 15 6 images (the around larger craters. Duplicate craters are removed in Latitude variation is due to the use of overlapping images). For ex- and Hynek (2012) database, a False Positive is a crater in ample, Gale crater appears at 5 resolutions in 9 images. the CDA database without a matching crater in the Rob- Each of the 55,000 images is processed by the CNN bins and Hynek (2012) database, and a False Negative is a and template matching algorithm to nd craters indepen- crater in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database without dently of the other images. The location and size of each a matching crater in the CDA database. True Negatives crater is found in pixel space during the template match- are not used. ing stage and then converted into geographic coordinates Using these de nitions, the precision P is de ned as the using the known limits of each image and the orthographic ratio of true positive to all identi cations, and the recall R projection parameters. as the ratio of true positives to all craters in the Robbins As a result of the overlapping images and multiple reso- and Hynek (2012) database. lutions, single craters may be identi ed in multiple images and appear multiple times in the generated global crater list. Duplicate craters are removed by comparing the di- P = ; (1) T + F p p ameter and location of the crater with other craters with similar location and size, using the same parameters as in R = (2) T + F the last section. p n Figure 2 shows the 9 images that include more than Where T , F , and F are the numbers of true posi- p p n 50% of Gale crater. In this example, Gale crater was found tives, false positives, and false negatives, respectively. A in 5 images. The 5 candidate craters are combined in the high precision suggests the CDA has a high fractional true post-processing stage to provide 1 location and size for positive rate, while a high recall suggests the CDA nds a Gale crater, preferentially using the values found in the high fraction of the existing craters. highest resolution image. As an extreme example, the CDA could identify craters Once all duplicates are removed the nal result is a everywhere on Mars whether they exist or not, resulting database with approximately 60,000 craters found by the in a perfect recall (all craters are found) but almost no CDA. This list includes only craters larger than 4km in precision (many false positives are found). Alternatively, diameter, the lower limit allowed in the algorithm. Above the CDA could identify a single crater correctly, resulting this 4km limit, the ring CDAs found 75% of all craters in perfect precision (no false positives) but almost no recall listed in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. Above (many missing craters, or having many false negatives). A 10km diameter, the ring CDAs found more than 80% of all common metric used to balance the precision and recall is craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. The the harmonic average of the two metrics, commonly called algorithm itself has no lower limit in geophysical space the F score, but does have a lower limit in pixel space. The circle{ matching algorithm works well for circles 10 pixels in di- 2PR F = (3) ameter or larger and continues to work down to 6{pixel 1 P + R diameter circles but with a higher false positive rate. Ten where the same F value can be found using di erent com- pixels in diameter represents a physical limit of 4km in binations of precision and recall. None of these metrics re- diameter using the 400m/pixel scale images. As a com- ward identi cation of new craters that do not exist in the parison, Robbins and Hynek (2012) used 256 pixel/degree Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. All new identi ca- THEMIS infra-red imagery that covers more of the planet tions are assumed false positives and reduce the precision than the DTM used here and the crater size limit reported and F score. The possible new crater fraction N is cal- in Robbins and Hynek (2012) is 1km, corresponding to an culated as the ratio of false positives to the sum of false absolute minimum of 5 pixels in diameter at the equa- positive and Robbins and Hynek (2012) craters, tor. Robbins and Hynek (2013) suggested a lower diam- eter limit of 10km for MOLA derived DTM data, noting N = (4) that the higher resolution DTMs derived from HRSC are F + T P R better at resolving smaller craters. Where T is the number of true craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. This is an upper limit on the 3.6. Accuracy Metrics number of new craters found, and because the Robbins In each experiment, the performance of the CDA is and Hynek (2012) database is statistically complete below measured against the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database the 4km limit used here it is likely that many false positive using standard metrics. The crater locations in the CDA are genuine false positives and not new craters. In Silburt database and the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database are et al. (2019) a sample of the false positive craters was compared using the same methodology used to nd dupli- studied and they estimated that 89% of the false positive cate craters. If the CDA nds a crater within 0.25 diameter craters are new craters (11% are genuine false positives, units in location and size of a crater from the Robbins and Silburt et al. (2019) table 1). Hynek (2012) database then it is considered a match. A True Positive is a match between the CNN and Robbins 6 1 2 3 -4 -5 -5 -7 -10 -10 136 139 131 136 136 142 4 5 6 4 -6 1 -7 -17 -21 131 142 131 142 110 132 7 8 9 1 37 -5 -21 -7 -48 131 153 110 154 110 154 Longitude Figure 2: DTM images where more than 50% of Gale crater is contained in the image. Gale crater is highlighted with a red circle (using the Robbins and Hynek (2012) location) and a blue circle where it was identi ed by the CDA in each image. The CDA identi ed the crater in 5 images in this example data (4,5,7,8,9). The crater in images 1,2, and 3 is probably too big for the current algorithm. Image 2 and 6 only include partial circles and lie below the detection threshold. Latitude For further comparison with the Robbins and Hynek matches along the crater wall, or comparing candidate cir- (2012) database I also calculated the di erence in longi- cles against the space between two or more nearby craters if tude, latitude, and diameter between the CNN craters and the 'void' between the craters can be identi ed as a crater. Robbins and Hynek (2012) craters, both in pixel units and geophysical units. Each of these metrics is calculated as 4. Results the ratio relative to the smallest crater diameter in the comparison and given as the mean value and interquartile Table 1 gives the metrics for the three di erent exper- ranges for the dataset. iments. All of the metrics are calculated using the same source images but the training of each network is di erent. 3.7. Error Sources The \Moon" trained CDA uses the network generated by A few sources of error are present in the experiments, Silburt et al. (2019) with no further training. The \Mars" from observational constraints, pixelization of the source trained CDA uses the network trained on a subset of the data, and the algorithm design. martian crater catalog, where the network is trained to nd The source DTM combines HRSC and MOLA data at the crater rim. The \Disk" trained network is also trained a stated scale of 200m/pixel. However, this is obtained by on martian crater images, but is trained to nd the whole upsampling the MOLA data from 463m/pixel for 56% of disk of the crater, instead of just the rim. Table 1 includes the surface, and downsampling HRSC images for the re- data from 55,000 images derived from the global MOLA/ maining 44%. The smallest image scale used in this exper- HRSC DTM. As a comparison, the same crater match- iment was 400m/pixel, close to the MOLA laser footprint ing analysis was performed using the Salamuni ccar et al. of 300m, giving a accuracy limit of .4km in crater location (2012) catalog in comparison to the Robbins and Hynek and diameter (i.e., 1 pixel). (2012) catalog. In this case, the recall is 79% (21% of the The crater position is extracted by matching circular craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) catalog have no templates on images. The discrete nature of the images matching crater in the Salamuni ccar et al. (2012) catalog) limits the matches to 1 pixel in any image. At the highest and the precision is 92% (8% of the craters in the Sala- image resolution used this corresponds to the .4km accu- muni ccar et al. (2012) catalog have no matching crater in racy limit above, but in images with a larger pixel scale the Robbins and Hynek (2012) catalog). Equivalently, the the accuracy decreases at a corresponding rate. At the recall and precision of the Stepinski et al. (2011) crater 12.8km/pixel scale for the largest images, the accuracy catalog relative to Robbins and Hynek (2012) is 59% and drops to about 6km at the equator. In practical terms, a 50%, respectively. crater is likely to be found when it is between 10 pixels A smaller dataset using only images that were withheld and 30 pixels in diameter, making the 1 pixel uncertainty during the training phase for the Mars trained CNN is equivalent to a 3{10% error in position or diameter. When shown in table 2. None of the CDAs were shown the images the global CDA database is generated, the highest resolu- summarized in table 2 during training. tion image that included the crater detection was used When training machine{learning algorithms there is a to obtain the best overall position and size data for each risk of `over tting' where the algorithm becomes signi - crater in the nal dataset. For example, in the Gale crater cantly better (by some metric) on the dataset it is trained example in gure 2, image 4 or 5 would be used when with, at the expense of performing poorly on data it has calculating the location and size of the crater. not been shown. This over tting can be seen when the Projecting the DTM from Plate Care into orthographic precision (or recall, or F1 score) of the algorithm is much and back introduces some errors depending on the extent higher for a `training' dataset than an unseen `validation' of the image, as distortion increases away from the center dataset. Comparing the results in table 1 and 2, the met- point of the projection. Silburt et al. (2019) estimated an rics calculated for the validation dataset and the complete error of 2% in the crater size for typical images, which be- (validation and training) dataset suggests the networks are comes larger than the pixelization errors for craters larger not over tting the training data. This is reinforced by the than about 50 pixels in diameter. Few craters were found performance of the \Moon" trained CDA that has never larger than 30 pixels in diameter so the contribution of been trained using the Mars dataset. Di erences between this error is negligible. the global and validation metrics for this CDA re ect sta- Finally, algorithmic implementation also introduces some tistical di erences in the performance of the CDA on the uncertainty. In the CNN step, the image bit resolution two datasets. is limited to 8{bits of data, which for large images with In the following subsections I examine the performance vertically extended topography would obfuscate shallower of the CDA in more detail. The results are separated craters { 1km of vertical extent requires a vertical reso- by the type of detection: section 4.1 examines all CDA lution of 4m at best, while an image that includes Olym- crater detections in comparison to the Robbins and Hynek pus Mons and the surrounding terrain might be limited (2012) dataset; section 4.2 examines at the matched (true to 100m vertical resolution. In the template matching positives ) in the CDA datasets; section 4.3 examines the step, spurious matches can occur when comparing small craters missed by the CDA (false negatives ), and I use the candidate craters against large craters as the template extended data provided in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) 8 Moon Moon Mars Mars Disk Disk (image) (global) (image) (global) (image) (global) Crater count 9:9  10:0 57; 564 9:9  10:0 57; 564 9:9  10:0 57; 564 Craters detected 4:8  5:1 54; 739 4:9  5:2 57; 767 5:1  4:9 75; 733 Craters matched 4:3  4:7 42; 445 4:4  4:8 42; 891 4:3  4:7 39; 149 +2 +1 +2 +1 +2 +1 Latitude Error 4 2 4 2 4 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 Longitude Error 5 2 5 3 5 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 +3 +4 +3 +4 +4 +5 Diameter Error 6 5 7 6 9 6 3 3 3 3 4 3 Percentage new craters 5  8 18 5  8 21 7  11 39 Maximum diameter (pix) 34:1  20:0 33:5  19:8 32:7  18:9 Precision 90  18 78 89  19 74 84  23 52 Recall 42  21 74 43  21 75 44  23 68 F1 58  17 76 59  17 74 58  18 59 Table 1: Metrics calculated for three neural network based CDAs. \Moon trained" and \Mars trained" refer to the data used to train the initial model. \Disk" trained using Mars crater imagery in training, but identi ed disks associated with craters instead of crater \rings". All metrics were calculated using the same martian crater images from MOLA/HRSC. Values are given as mean  1 standard deviation (for single values after the ) or median  inter{quartile range (for two values after the ) as in Silburt et al. (2019). Precision, recall, and F scores are given as percentages. Each model appears twice, with the \image" column given the per image metrics aggregated over the ensemble of 55,000 images (after removing duplicates per image), and the \global" column gives the post-processed metrics (after removing duplicates globally). Moon Moon Mars Mars Disk Disk (image) (global) (image) (global) (image) (global) Crater count 8:1  5:3 32; 979 8:1  5:3 32; 979 8:1  5:3 32; 979 Craters detected 3:9  3:1 26; 808 4:0  3:2 28; 198 4:2  3:2 34; 419 Craters matched 3:4  2:9 21; 732 3:5  2:9 21; 985 3:5  2:9 19; 949 +2 +1 +2 +1 +2 +1 Latitude Error 4 2 4 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +2 Longitude Error 5 2 5 2 5 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 +3 +4 +3 +4 +5 +5 Diameter Error 6 5 7 6 8 6 3 3 3 3 4 3 Percentage new craters 4  8 13 5  8 16 8  11 30 Maximum diameter (pix) 34:1  20:3 33:6  20:2 32:6  19:1 Precision 90  18 81 89  19 78 83  24 58 Recall 42  22 66 43  22 67 44  23 60 F1 58  18 73 59  18 72 58  19 59 Table 2: Metrics calculated using the validation dataset as in table 1, but for a subset of the images not used in training the \Mars trained" or \Disk trained" networks. dataset to identify the characteristics of the those missing ameter. Craters below 4km are omitted from this dataset craters; nally, section 4.4 examines the craters found by because of the lack of DTM data that resolve these craters. the CDAs that do not exist in the Robbins and Hynek Table 3 gives the crater numbers in each of the geologic (2012) dataset { the false positives. unit types listed in Tanaka et al. (2014) for the 3 CDAs and the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. The numbers are 4.1. All Craters similar in the two ring{ nding CDAs and the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database, although there are craters listed First, I compare the complete dataset generated by in the CDA datasets that are not present in the Robbins CDAs to the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset. Figure and Hynek (2012) database (the TPR percentage shown 3 shows the crater distribution binned by diameter follow- in the table re ects this). The disk{ nding CDA tends to ing the power law distribution used in Robbins and Hynek nd many more craters in all geologic units and has more (2012), and shows good agreement between the CDAs and false positives (lower TPR) as a result. Figure 4 shows the the expected power law distribution. I used 16 bins per same results but binned by longitude and latitude instead octave (Robbins and Hynek, 2012) of crater size instead of geology. The two ring{ nding CDAs tend to under{ of the 2 bins used in (Stepinski et al., 2009) and Arvidson predict craters in regions with many craters, and over{ et al. (1979). The discretization present in the diameter predict in regions with few craters. The disk{ nding CDA measurements from the CDAs has been removed from the over{predicts the number of craters almost everywhere. data by applying a Gaussian noise multiplier (with magni- tude of 5%, smaller than the global mean diameter error in 4.2. Matched Craters table 1 of 7%) to each data point. With only 2 bins/octave (Arvidson et al., 1979) the distributions would agree with The Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset used here con- each other without the need for the de{aliasing jitter in tains 57,564 craters greater than 4km in diameter. The the CDA data. The peaks at 8km and 16km are residuals ring CDAs tested nd 75% of the craters in the Robbins of this jittering process and represent the smallest crater and Hynek (2012) dataset with a median di erence in lo- sizes found in the most common image resolutions used in cation of 2% and diameter of 5% measured in geophysi- the experiments. The CDA nds 80% of the craters larger cal units relative to the crater diameter. This di erence than 10 km diameter listed in the Robbins and Hynek is typical of variability between human analysts in crater (2012) database, and 75% of craters larger than 4km in di- studies (Robbins et al., 2014). In raw pixel terms, the dif- 9 6 Moon Moon Mars Mars Disk Disk Robbins Robbins 1 2 1 2 10 10 10 10 Diameter (km) Diameter (km) Figure 3: (left) Crater population as a function of crater diameter (km) for the datasets generated by the CDAs. (Right) R factor (Arvidson et al., 1979) for the same dataset. The raw dataset from the CDA contains aliasing due to the small number of image resolutions used in the algorithm. This discretization has be removed from the data by applying a random jitter to the crater sizes equal to 5%, smaller than the mean diameter error over all CDA datasets in table 1. Apron Basin Highland Impact Lowland Polar Transition Volcanic Robbins Count 116 467 41,749 3,016 2,858 660 3,587 5,112 Mars Count 128 585 40,181 3,129 3,322 911 3,645 5,866 TPR (%) 49 53 79 72 68 44 68 69 Moon Count 108 521 38,376 2,990 3,089 785 3,397 5,473 TPR (%) 56 58 81 76 73 52 72 74 Disk Count 218 1,008 48,328 4,020 5,314 1,389 5,716 9,740 TPR (%) 20 26 59 52 42 26 40 39 Table 3: Distribution of craters by geologic unit type given in Tanaka et al. (2014). The `Robbins' row gives the distribution of craters derived from craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. The True Positive Rate (TPR) gives the percentage of craters found by the CDA that exist in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. ferences in position and size between the CDA and Rob- tected craters. bins datasets are typically 1 or 2 pixels. The distribution In terms of geophysical location and size, the distribu- for each metric in pixel space is shown in gure 5, with tions of error in the longitude, latitude, and diameter of the median and inter-quartile ranges given in table 4. the matched craters are shown in gure 6, with median The ring trained CDAs and the disk trained CDA have and inter{quartile values given in table 1 and 2. After similar accuracy on the location but the opposite sign in aggregating the per{image metrics to produce the global the crater diameter di erences. This apparent bias may be dataset, the CDA errors decrease as duplicate craters are a result of the method used to generate each prediction, ltered for higher precision crater location determined us- as the disk{ nding CNN uses a Sobel and Feldman (1968) ing the highest resolution image. transform to convert the predicted disks into rings, and In the global dataset size errors decrease from 6% to places the ring within the perimeter of the disk, instead of 4% (medians) in the combined \Ring+Disk" CDA, but the on the outer edge. improvement comes at the expense of recall. In the glob- This bias can be reduced by combining the results from ally aggregated data, the recall of the combined dataset the ring trained CDA and disk trained CDA such that is worse (at 60%) than the recall of the worst individual only craters found by both CDAs are considered detec- CDA (the Disk CDA), while the precision is better (at tions. This is shown as the \Ring+Disk" result in table 80%) than the best CDA (the Mars CDA). The resulting 4 and gure 5. The absolute mean di erence in diameter F score drops to 69%, worse than the Mars Ring CDA between the CDA and Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset and better than the Mars Disk CDA. decreases from 0.5 pixels to 0.05 pixels. The trade{o for As a comparison with the errors shown here, Robbins this improved accuracy is that only craters found by both and Hynek (2008) performed a similar study using human{ CDAs can be improved, and the recall of the worst CDA derived datasets from MOLA DTMs and THEMIS im- limits the number of craters that can be improved. In agery and noted that the DTM derived crater sizes are typ- this dataset, 63% of the existing craters are found by both ically 1km larger than the imagery resolved counterparts. CDAs providing a smaller catalog of more con dently de- In this work the DTM derived crater sizes are 0.05km to Count R factor Moon Mars Disk Ring+Disk +0:4 +0:4 +0:4 +0:3 Horizontal (longitudinal) 0:6 0:7 0:6 0:7 0:4 0:4 0:4 0:3 +0:4 +0:4 +0:5 +0:3 Vertical (latitudinal) 0:1 0:03 0:06 0:009 0:4 0:4 0:5 0:4 +0:3 +0:3 +0:3 +0:3 Diameter 0:4 0:4 0:4 0:05 0:3 0:3 0:3 0:2 Table 4: Median and inter-quartile ranges for the image level di erences between the Robbins and Hynek (2012) crater database and the CDA predictions. All values are given as median and interquartile values of the pixel level di erences between the CDA and Robbins and Hynek (2012) data. 0.92km larger than the Robbins and Hynek (2012) data (25% to 75% percentiles) with the median crater being 0.44km larger. Twenty three percent of the DTM derived craters are smaller than their Robbins and Hynek (2012) counterpart. 4.3. Missed Craters Moon None of the CDAs found every crater in the Robbins 45 and Hynek (2012) list even if they found more than 57,564 craters in total. The missing craters don't need to share any characteristics but the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset includes a large number of parameters that might 90 illustrate why some craters were missed. In particular, the 180 90 0 90 180 Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset contains the depths Longitude for each crater, including the depth relative to the crater Mars edge (DEPTH RIMFLOOR), relative to the surrounding ter- rain (DEPTH SURFFLOOR), and the degradation/ preserva- tion state (DEGRADATION STATE) that rates the condition of the crater from highly{degraded (1) to not{degraded (4). A `random decision forest' algorithm (Ho, 1998) was used to identify these three parameters as most correlated with missing craters in this CDA relative to the Robbins 180 90 0 90 180 Longitude and Hynek (2012). Disk Comparing the Mars ring CDA with the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset (the other CDAs perform similarly), shallow craters are more likely to be missed than deep craters, and highly{degraded craters are more likely to be missed than non{degraded craters. For example craters with a rim- oor depth of 105m or less account for 15% of the dataset, but accounted for 36% of the missed craters. 180 90 0 90 180 Highly degraded craters made up 45% of all craters but Longitude 75% of the missed craters (all other degradation states have a false negative rate of less than 5%). When com- 4 2 0 2 4 bined, crater depth is a stronger determinant than the 4 2 craters/10 km degradation state. In all degradation states, shallower craters were more likely to be missed than deep craters. In the worst case of highly degraded craters, shallower Figure 4: Plate Car ee maps of the crater number predictions from the craters are missed at a rate 10 times higher than the deeper CDA relative to the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset, binned into 5 degree square bins and scaled to represent the number of craters craters. per 10,000 square kilometer predicted by each CDA in excess of the Examples of missed and detected craters are shown in Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. Positive numbers (reds) rep- gure 7. Some of the less degraded craters can be found resent an over{prediction by the CDA and negative numbers (blues) more easily in the THEMIS IR dataset used by Robbins represent an under{prediction. and Hynek (2012) because of the contrasting e ect of sun- light on the exposed edges of the crater. Although the impact of the degradation state and crater depth were not known during the training step of this ex- periment, the di erent crater types were well represented in the crater populations used in training and validation Latitude Latitude Latitude horizontal (pix) vertical (pix) Radius (pix) 1.0 1.0 1.0 Moon Moon Moon Mars Mars Mars Disk Disk Disk Ring+Disk Ring+Disk Ring+Disk 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 4 2 0 2 4 4 2 0 2 4 4 2 0 2 4 Error (pix) Error (pix) Error (pix) Figure 5: Distribution of pixel level di erences between the CDA crater detection and the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset. Two additional merged CDA datasets are also included. \Ring+Disk" includes craters found in both the Mars CDA and the Disk CDA. Density is given in units of "per pixel" and is normalized. Longitude Latitude Radius 0.25 0.25 0.25 Moon Moon Moon Mars Mars Mars Disk Disk Disk Ring+Disk Ring+Disk Ring+Disk 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 0 5 10 15 20 0 5 10 15 20 0 5 10 15 20 Error (%) Error (%) Error (%) Figure 6: Error density plots for craters found by each CDA with a matching crater in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset, given as the absolute fractional error relative to the crater diameter. (Left) Longitude errors, (center) latitude errors, (right) absolute diameter errors. Per{image statistics are shown with dashed lines, globally aggregated data is shown with solid lines The summary median and inter{quartile ranges for this data is given in table 1. Density Density Density Density Density Density 1-shallow-missed 2-shallow-missed 3-shallow-missed 4-shallow-missed 7.93 47.35 40.70 43.14 7.75 47.19 40.49 42.95 7.15 km 6.67 km 8.25 km 7.29 km 194.15 194.33 92.14 92.31 177.57 177.78 179.58 179.76 1-deep-missed 2-deep-missed 3-deep-missed 4-deep-missed -17.22 17.58 44.90 41.45 44.66 -17.41 17.42 41.27 7.29 km 6.35 km 9.30 km 7.04 km 44.23 44.41 338.60 338.77 210.16 210.40 328.07 328.25 1-shallow-matched 2-shallow-matched 3-shallow-matched 4-shallow-matched -0.76 21.19 43.08 6.72 6.55 -0.92 21.04 42.92 6.41 km 6.26 km 6.58 km 6.88 km 48.30 48.47 168.97 169.13 213.84 214.00 123.12 123.29 1-deep-matched 2-deep-matched 3-deep-matched 4-deep-matched -22.79 40.65 -2.78 3.52 -24.09 40.14 -3.02 3.37 51.28 km 20.21 km 9.59 km 6.19 km -25.39 39.63 40.63 41.93 43.23 47.55 48.06 48.57 275.12 275.37 25.14 25.29 Longitude Longitude Longitude Longitude Figure 7: Randomly selected examples of craters from each degradation state (columns) and depth (alternating rows) that were missed (top two rows) or matched (bottom two rows). Each image includes the crater at the center of the image, and a border of 1 crater width on each side. The shades in each image are indicative of local topography in the image, but not necessarily the images presented to the CDA. The red text in bottom left of each panel gives the diameter of the centered crater. The scale bar at the top right is 10km in all images, marked at 0,5,10km. Latitude Latitude Latitude Latitude datasets. If this were not the case, it might have been pos- crater catalog was less complete and 15% of the new de- sible to improve the performance of the CNN on the shal- tections by the (Silburt et al., 2019) CDA were below the low degraded craters by ensuring a representative sample lower limit of their \ground truth" database. Additionally, of these craters in the training dataset. the test posed in Silburt et al. (2019) is framed di erently, asking whether a human researcher would identify the fea- 4.4. False Positives ture as a crater, rather than asking whether the feature is The CDAs each detected craters that do not exist in actually a crater given all the available information. the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset that are consid- ered false positives. A large fraction of these detections 5. Conclusions were likely correctly identi ed as false positives (i.e., the craters do not exist), with a much smaller fraction being In this paper, I have applied a new Crater Detection real craters missing from the Robbins and Hynek (2012) Algorithm (CDA) to nd craters in Mars digital terrain dataset. model. The CDA combines a multi{layer neural network Table 3 gives the number of craters in each CDA and to highlight circular features and a template correlation the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset, grouped by geo- algorithm to determine their location and size. The best logic type (Tanaka et al., 2014). The table also gives the CDA used here nds 75% of the craters listed in a com- true positive rate or the fraction of craters in each CDA prehensive existing dataset (Robbins and Hynek, 2012), in that correspond to a known crater. The remaining craters line with typical human performance on similar datasets are the false positives. The relatively poor performance (Wetzler et al., 2007). I also showed that a CDA trained of the CDAs in the Apron, Basin, and Polar terrain only on lunar data (Silburt et al., 2019) performed well on the has a small impact on the overall results | These terrains martian DTMs without further training. account for less than 1,500 craters i The performance of each CDA was measured against Examples of false positives in the Mars ring dataset the Robbins and Hynek (2012) crater list, and the pre- are shown in gure 8, grouped by the crater diameter. dicted locations and sizes of craters compare well with that Some of the false positive detections have the appearance dataset. The ring nding CDAs nd craters over the en- of craters while others are not obviously circular features tire martian surface with no signi cant bias in location, (with 10,000+ false positives the small sample shown is size, or geology, and with di erences of around 5% of the random and not necessarily representative). For the larger crater size and location relative to the Robbins and Hynek detected features, many are paterae that are, correctly, not (2012) dataset, in line with estimated errors from human{ listed in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) crater catalog. Fif- generated crater datasets (Robbins et al., 2014). The disk teen of the 20 largest diameter `false positives' correspond nding CDA performs worse in general and is signi cantly to mountains or paterae, and another 20 of the next largest worse at nding craters in Impact, Basin, or Polar geologic 80 `false positive' detections are named features on Mars unit types than in the Highlands (Tanaka et al., 2014). that are not craters. The CDA is correct in identifying The best CDA developed here misses many existing these circular features in the DTM, but incorrect in la- craters, and misidenti es other features as craters. The belling them as craters. ring trained CDA missed 54% of those craters in the most For smaller sized features the results are less promising. degraded state, and 80% of those craters shallower than A review of a random sample of 300 features below 5km 105m from rim to oor. Given the large number of shallow in diameter did not identify any de nitively new craters craters missed, it might be possible to improve the perfor- | Approximately 30% were depressions related to valleys mance of the CNN stage by increasing the `contrast' of the or topography, but are not craters; 5% were detections of DTM images by limiting the vertical extent in each image, craters with a diameter of 4km in the CDA but below this similar to the pre{processing technique used in Stepinski threshold in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset (and et al. (2009) to limit the horizontal scale of craters in each are therefore removed from the dataset) ; 5% of the craters image. are circular features in the DTM data, but disappear in A key feature of any automated CDA is the ability to higher resolution imagery. Most of the remaining 60% are make predictions rapidly and without human intervention. appropriately labelled as false positives and were not crater The CDA developed here can work with any standard like even in the available DTM data. Only a small number DTM dataset and can generate 100{1,000 crater predic- of samples are possibly new craters, resulting in fewer than tions per second on consumer hardware. DTMs generated 100 new crater detections in the CDA datasets. from high resolution imagery can be used to generate cat- Silburt et al. (2019) attempted to answer a similar alogs of craters not available in current databases (Lee, question by providing a sample of the false positives to 2018), and could be incorporated into existing data pro- researchers to categorize as crater or not. In that case cessing pipelines. The overall speed bene t produced by 89% were identi ed as new craters, in stark contrast to the the CDA depends on the number of manual corrections numbers here. However, according to Robbins and Hynek needed to create a nal catalog. With approximately 25% (2012) their database is statistically complete below the false positive rate and 25% false negative rate (the Mars lower limit of 4km considered here. For Lunar data, the 14 (6, 10]-new (10, 40]-new (40, 60]-new (60, 100]-new (100, 400]-new 2 3 4 5 15.23 3.53 -55.67 -8.59 -50.21 -50.35 14.55 2.73 -56.97 -8.67 -8.75 -50.49 13.86 1.93 -58.28 -8.83 -50.63 13.18 1.12 -59.58 54.18 km 63.53 km 102.90 km 6.36 km 11.14 km 136.43 136.51 136.60 136.68 173.85 173.99 174.13 174.27 350.44 351.12 351.81 352.49 132.03 132.83 133.63 134.44 50.75 52.05 53.35 54.65 (6, 10]-matched (10, 40]-matched (40, 60]-matched (60, 100]-matched (100, 400]-matched 6 7 8 9 10 -54.51 -1.45 -55.18 -30.35 -33.14 -54.64 -1.59 -55.75 -31.57 -34.75 -54.76 -1.73 -56.31 -32.79 -36.37 -54.88 -1.87 -56.87 -34.01 -37.99 9.56 km 11.12 km 44.61 km 96.46 km 127.89 km 358.01 358.13 358.26 358.38 90.26 90.41 90.55 90.69 218.03 218.59 219.16 219.72 183.46 184.68 185.90 187.12 321.09 322.71 324.33 325.95 Longitude Longitude Longitude Longitude Longitude Figure 8: (top row) false positives in the Mars trained dataset, (bottom) true positives in the Mars trained dataset. The feature size increases from left to right (with the diameter range given in the title in kilometres) but the feature is randomly chosen from the CDA dataset. As in gure 7 the identi ed crater is centered in the image with a 1 diameter border around it and red text in bottom left of each panel gives the diameter of the centered crater. The scale bar at the top right is 10km in all images, marked at 0,5,10km. (image 5 is Peneus Patera.) trained ring CDA), 1 in 4 proposed craters would be re- 10.1016/j.ascom.2017.01.002. URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ j.ascom.2017.01.002. jected by an expert human classi er, and 1 in 4 craters R. Arvidson, J. Boyce, C. Chapman, M. Cintala, M. Fulchignoni, would need to be identi ed in the DTMs or by combining H. Moore, P. Schultz, L. Soderblom, R. Strom, A. Woronow, and the catalog with other sources. Given the time required to R. Young. Standard techniques for presentation and analysis of crater size-frequency data. Icarus, 37(2):467{474, 1979. ISSN accurately identify the rim of each crater in an image the 10902643. doi: 10.1016/0019-1035(79)90009-5. CDA should signi cantly reduce the time taken to make a R. E. Arvidson. Morphologic classi cation of Martian craters and crater catalog. some implications. Icarus, 22(3):264{271, 1974. ISSN 10902643. Finally, this work and others (Silburt et al., 2019; Lee, doi: 10.1016/0019-1035(74)90176-6. N. G. Barlow. Crater size-frequency distributions and a revised 2018) have shown that the CDA can be applied across dif- Martian relative chronology. Icarus, 75(2):285{305, 1988. ISSN ferent planets and DTM scales providing consistent datasets 10902643. doi: 10.1016/0019-1035(88)90006-1. are available, allowing meaningful comparison between dif- N. G. Barlow. Revision of the "Catalog of large martian impact ferent planetary bodies using a consistent processing algo- craters". In Sixth International Conference on Mars, 2003. N. G. Barlow. 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Automated crater detection on Mars using deep learning

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Abstract

Impact crater cataloging is an important tool in the study of the geological history of planetary bodies in the Solar System, including dating of surface features and geologic mapping of surface processes. Catalogs of impact craters have been created by a diverse set of methods over many decades, including using visible or near infra-red imagery and digital terrain models. I present an automated system for crater detection and cataloging using a digital terrain model (DTM) of Mars | In the algorithm craters are rst identi ed as rings or disks on samples of the DTM image using a convolutional neural network with a UNET architecture, and the location and size of the features are determined using a circle matching algorithm. I describe the crater detection algorithm (CDA) and compare its performance relative to an existing crater dataset. I further examine craters missed by the CDA as well as potential new craters found by the algorithm. I show that the CDA can nd three{quarters of the resolvable craters in the Mars DTMs, with a median di erence of 5-10% in crater diameter compared to an existing database. A version of this CDA has been used to process DTM data from the Moon and Mercury (Silburt et al., 2019). The source code for the complete CDA is available at https://github.com/silburt/DeepMoon, and Martian crater datasets generated using this CDA are available at https://doi.org/10.5683/SP2/MDKPC8. Keywords: Mars craters, Digital Terrain Model, Deep Learning, Convolutional Neural Network 1. Introduction the crater features. An important bene t of these CDAs is that it becomes possible to automate large parts of the Information on crater populations and spatial distribu- crater{ nding process and reduces the e ort required after tions provide important constraints on the geological his- the initial implementation. tory of planetary surfaces. Regional di erences in crater Automated CDAs have tunable parameters that can be distributions and population characteristics can be used optimized for the imagery or elevation dataset being pro- to constrain geologic processes and stratigraphy (Cintala cessed. In designing the algorithms, a curated list of crater et al., 1976; Wise and Minksowski, 1980; Barlow and Perez, locations and images are used in a \training" step to adjust 2003; Barlow, 2005), and crater populations can be used to these parameters. Once trained, the CDA can be applied estimate the age of surface features as well as constrain the to larger datasets from the same body or even applied to timescale of surface processes (Arvidson, 1974; Soderblom di erent planetary bodies through transfer learning (Sil- et al., 1974; Craddock et al., 1997; Stepinski and Urbach, burt et al., 2019). 2009; Tanaka et al., 2014). To enable such research, im- In this work, I use an automated CDA based on a Con- pact craters need to be identi ed, measured, and counted volutional Neural Network (CNN, Goodfellow et al., 2016) using imagery of a planet's surface. to identify circular crater{like features in a martian Dig- However, the task of creating a dataset of crater lo- ital Terrain Model (DTM). I perform three experiments cations has traditionally been a time{consuming process with the CDA to characterize its performance on the DTM of manually identifying craters in printed maps (Barlow, under various assumptions. In two of the experiments, I 1988) or digital imagery (Robbins and Hynek, 2012). Re- attempt to nd rings associated with the crater rims as cent advances in the quality of remote observations, in in Silburt et al. (2019) using CNNs trained on lunar data image processing techniques, and available computational (the Silburt et al. (2019) CDA) and martian data. In the power have lead to the development of advanced auto- third experiment, I train the CNN to nd disk structures mated Crater Detection Algorithms (CDAs, e.g., Stepinski associated with the entire crater. The latter method is et al., 2009; Di et al., 2014; Pedrosa et al., 2017; Silburt commonly used in image segmentation methods to iso- et al., 2019). These CDAs use di erent approaches and late features (e.g., cancerous cells in medical images, Ron- datasets, but each method attempts to identify crater{like neberger et al. (2015)) and a similar method was developed features on the surface using digital imagery or elevation by Stepinski et al. (2009). datasets and apply image processing techniques to isolate Preprint submitted to Elsevier April 18, 2019 arXiv:1904.07991v1 [astro-ph.EP] 16 Apr 2019 The CNN used in this work uses a standard \UNET" tiple automated CDAs in a weighted `voting' algorithm architecture (Ronneberger et al., 2015) that is commonly (based on skill, as is done for human classi ers Robbins used in image segmentation and processing, and similar (2017)) to provide a more robust automated method for CNNs have been applied to identi cation of tumors in cataloging craters. medical images (C  i cek et al., 2016), identi cation of radio frequency interference in astronomical data (Akeret et al., 2. Prior Work 2017), and crater detection on the Moon using a DTM from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (Silburt et al., One of the rst large global databases for Mars was cre- 2019). The architecture of the CNN is not the primary ated by Barlow (1988) using printed maps from Viking or- purpose of this work, and the reader is referred to the biters and included 25,826 craters with a diameter greater referenced work for an in{depth discussion of the method- than 8km. This dataset has been updated since then ology. (Barlow, 2003) with 42,283 craters, and other datasets The remainder of this paper is organized as follows: are available (Rodionova et al. (2000) with 19,308 craters, in section 2 I review prior work in developing automated Salamuni ccar and Lon cari c (2008) with 57,633 craters). CDAs; in section 3 I describe the crater detection algo- The most comprehensive dataset for Mars craters is that rithm, the training and data processing involved, and the derived from the Thermal Emission Imaging System in- structure of the experiments; in section 4 I discuss the strument by Robbins and Hynek (2012). The Robbins metrics calculated for each experiment and examine the and Hynek (2012) dataset includes 383,343 craters with di- new crater catalogs in detail; nally, in section 5 I provide ameters greater than 1km, including 30,473 craters above concluding remarks. 8km diameter. These craters were identi ed in 256 pixel/- The software used to make CDA described here is based degree resolution THEMIS IR imagery using a customized on the work of Silburt et al. (2019) with three modi ca- manual image processing pipeline. The Robbins and Hynek tions: The source data used here retains the 16{bit raw (2012) dataset is reported to be statistically complete to precision of the source DTM compared to 8{bit image used 1km diameter for the majority of Mars covered by the in Silburt et al. (2019); a disk{ nding CNN is implemented source THEMIS dataset, re ected in the power law dis- with an additional processing step, discussed later; the dis- tribution following the expected distribution to diameters tance and size thresholds used to determine duplicates and of 1km or lower (Arvidson et al., 1979). In this work, I matches in the database were reduced to 0.25 of the crater consider craters with a diameter greater than 4km based diameter (from 2.6 and 1.8 diameter units). on the resolution limit of the input DTM. The original code is available at https://github.com/ In contrast to the attempts to catalog martian craters silburt/DeepMoon.git , updates and modi cations to using manual methods, automated CDAs have not been the code can be found at https://github.com/eelsirhc/ extensively used to generate global catalogs of martian DeepMars.git . The catalogs generated here, along with craters, but have been used to catalog small test areas ancillary data, can be found at https://doi.org/10.5683/ containing a mixture of crater types. Two common met- SP2/MDKPC8. Similarly to Silburt et al. (2019), I use Keras rics used in machine learning comparisons are precision (Chollet, 2015) version 2 with Tensor ow (Abadi et al., and recall, whose mathematical de nitions are given in the 2016) to build, train, and test the model. In training the next section. Precision is the fraction of craters found by model I used an Nvidia 1080 Ti GPU using the CUDA the CDA that exist in a target dataset (usually a subset and CUDNN support libraries, but the code is compatible of Barlow (1988) or Robbins and Hynek (2012)), and the with Intel and AMD CPUs. recall is the fraction of craters in the target dataset that In the results presented here, no manual corrections are found by the CDA. In the calculation of precision, the have been applied to the generated catalogs to improve e ect of detected craters that are real, but do not exist in the accuracy of the crater catalog. As a result, the CDAs the target dataset, is to decrease the precision. miss around 25% of the craters in the Robbins and Hynek Stepinski et al. (2009) developed the AutoCrat CDA (2012) dataset, and nd an additional 25% that do not using the 128pixels/degree DTM from the Mars Orbiting match craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012). These Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument. The AutoCrat CDA numbers are signi cantly better than previous automated combines a \rule-based" module that applies gradient{ algorithms (e.g., Stepinski et al., 2011)) and worse than based algorithms to identify local depressions as possible current alternative crater catalogs created by expert hu- craters, followed by a \machine-learning" module that ap- man classi ers (Salamuni ccar et al., 2012). While it would plies a decision tree algorithm (Witten and Frank, 2005) be possible to manually inspect the roughly 15,000 `new' to determine whether the feature is a crater or not. The crater candidates, or add the roughly 15,000 missed craters decision tree algorithm is used to di erentiate craters from to the new catalog, that would not lead to an improvement non{crater depressions using diameter, depth, and shape in the performance of the CDA on observations that have parameters as factors. Only a small fraction of the planet not been studied by expert human classi ers. The better is covered in Stepinski et al. (2009), with a reported preci- approach to improving the CDA on unseen data, tested sion of 42% (1,544 known craters out of 3,666 detections) here and in Lee (2018), is to combine the results from mul- and a recall of 72% (1,544 out of 2,144 known craters 2 were found). A global database generated using this CDA the High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC, Jaumann was reported in Stepinski and Urbach (2009) with 75,919 et al., 2007) aboard Mars Express. The stated scale of craters larger than 1.37km. the dataset is 200m/pixel horizontally, chosen as a com- Di et al. (2014) developed a CDA that also processed promise between the 463m/pixel scale of MOLA and the DTM images. Their CDA uses a sliding window correla- 50m/pixel scale of HRSC. However, the HRSC DTMs that tor to nd and highlight crater edge features and a circu- were included cover only 44% of the planet, so more than lar Hough transform to transform those highlighted crater half of the planet is interpolated from MOLA dataset at edges into locations and sizes. Di et al. (2014) reports on 463m/pixel scale. Some regions have no data from either the CDA performance for three sites with 11,868 craters, spacecraft. The stated accuracy of each point is 100m hor- but they do not provide an explicit calculation of precision izontally and at best 1m radially (Fergason et al., 2018). and recall. Di et al. (2014) reports nding 934 craters in The total image size of the DTM is 106694  53347 pix- total, with 114 false positives (a precision of 87%) with a els with 16{bit resolution for the elevation data, using a recall rate using the same data (their table 2) of 74% for simple cylindrical (Plate Carr ee) projection. The e ective 1 1 th craters with a diameter greater than 6km, but a recall rate resolution of this source image is of a degree, and 296 2 of less than 10% for all craters tested. m vertically (better than the resolution of the input data). Pedrosa et al. (2017) developed a CDA using thermal The CDA takes as input a 256  256 pixel 8{bit im- imagery from THEMIS. The CDA processes THEMIS IR age taken from the larger DTM and attempts to identify imagery by rst identifying geophysical depressions using craters within this image. To prepare an image for use a `watershed' transform (to nd virtual oodplains) and with the CDA I use the following steps: then within each watershed identi ed the local minima 1. A square sample is extracted from the DTM and as possible craters. A circle template matching algorithm resampled into the required 256  256 size. is then used to compare the crater features to a charac- 2. The bit resolution of the image is rescaled from the teristic ring representing the crater rim. Pedrosa et al. 16{bit source to the 8{bit resolution required for the (2017) reports a precision and recall of 65% and 91%, re- CDA. This step occurs after resampling the image spectively (their gure 7), compared to a target dataset to a smaller region to mitigate the e ect of the large of 3,600 craters. The template matching system employed altitude variation on Mars. by Pedrosa et al. (2017) is similar to the method used in 3. The image is orthographically projected using the Silburt et al. (2019) and here to nd the location of each Cartopy Python package (Met Oce, 2018) to pro- crater. vide an image with near{constant linear scale instead Salamuni ccar et al. (2011) provides a summary of many of the constant angular resolution of the Plate Carre more automated CDAs, and a discussion of the e ect of projection. combining multiple CDAs into one dataset. The various methods used in the CDAs are essentially the same as the 4. Padding is added to the image as required to ll in CDA developed here. A correlation function is used to the square image after projection. The Orthograph- identify features that identify a crater | edges in Di et al. ically projected image always occupies fewer pixels (2014), disks in Stepinski et al. (2009), opposing crescents than the Plate Carre source image. in Pedrosa et al. (2017). Once the crater is identi ed a The size of the image sample (step 1) is chosen from a circle nding algorithm is used to determine the location list of sizes from 512 to 16,384 pixels to provide a range of and size | a Hough transform in Di et al. (2014), a slid- scales from 400m/pixel to 12.8km/pixel. The full dataset ing window correlator in Pedrosa et al. (2017). In the is constructed by sampling the entire planet at a range of CDA developed here, discussed in detail in the next sec- pixel scales and with overlapping regions between adjacent tion, the CNN implements a sequence of correlation func- images, requiring 55,000 images in total. I also tested an tions to identify and highlight the crater, followed by a additional 150,000 images sampled at the original scale of circle matching algorithm to determine the location of the the DTM (200m/pixel), but the performance of the CDA craters. degrades substantially because of the coarser scale of the majority of the input DTM. An alternate method used by 3. Methods Silburt et al. (2019) was to select the location and size of the images at random, which provides similar statistical 3.1. Input dataset results to the systematic method above, but would not The source digital terrain model (DTM) for this work guarantee planet-wide coverage. is the Mars HRSC MOLA Blended DEM Global 200m v2 In the current implementation of the CNN each image (Fergason et al., 2018) dataset available from the Astroge- takes 0.5Mbit of storage, but this is not the limiting fac- ology Science Center website (https://astrogeology.usgs.gov). tor in the algorithm. Each instance of the UNET CNN This map is a blend of digital terrain models derived from requires storing 10 million parameters (the connections the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA, Smith et al., between each layer) and uses 600MB of storage. During 2001) aboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, and training 16 images are simultaneously processed requiring 3 9.6GB of memory. At this scale, a consumer video card Figure 1{right super-poses the input DTM image with (Nvidia 1080 Ti) is approximately an order of magnitude the known craters (Robbins and Hynek, 2012) in red and faster than a 32 core Intel Xeon workstation with 192GB of craters found by the ring nding Mars{trained CDA in memory. Further, the GPU is optimized for 8{bit integer blue. In this image overlapping blue and red circles iden- operations compared to 16{bit oating point operations, tify craters correctly identi ed by the CNN (though some and can process an 8{bit image up to 200 faster than the are displaced spatially), red circles with no blue counter- equivalent 16{bit image. part are missed craters (false negatives in machine learning The source crater catalog for this work is the Robbins terminology), while blue circles with no red counterpart and Hynek (2012) catalog, with 383,343 craters larger than are features incorrectly identi ed as craters by the CNN 1km in diameter. To mitigate problems with the resolution (false positives ). In principle, the false positives might be of the DTM (discussed above) and possible problems with new craters, but I will suggest later that the majority are craters smaller than 2km in diameter from the Robbins not new craters, although some are genuine circular fea- and Hynek (2012) catalog (Robbins, 2017) I include only tures (e.g., paterae). The rightmost panel of gure 1 has craters larger than 4km in diameter in this work. a strict 4{pixel diameter cuto such that craters might be removed from one catalog and not the other, appearing as 3.2. Experiments false positives (only blue circles) or false negatives/missed I performed three experiments with the CDA. The rst craters (only red circles) even if a matching smaller crater experiment uses a CNN trained on Lunar data (Silburt exists. et al., 2019) to nd ring structures associated with the For the CNN trained with martian craters, I use 30,000 crater rim. This CNN has not been previously trained images distributed in location and scale in the training on Mars crater observations and is an example of transfer dataset (5,000 images were reserved for a testing stage learning. during the training), and 25,000 images in the validation The second experiment modi es the rst by training dataset. The images are distributed geographically so that the CNN using a subset of the Mars crater imagery without both datasets contain unique images but similar spatial using the previously Moon trained CNN. The target data distributions. The image extents are also distributed be- for the training is derived from a human{generated crater tween datasets, with similar numbers of each scale in each database (Robbins and Hynek, 2012) using high{resolution dataset. The small number of large geographically ex- infra{red imagery. In the second experiment, the CNN is tended images (fewer than 500) means they are unevenly trained to identify rings associated with the rims of craters, distributed between the two datasets. and a summary of the training method is provided in the A single iteration of the training uses all 20,000 train- next subsection. ing images and measures the accuracy of the updated CNN In the third experiment, the CNN is modi ed to iden- using the 5,000 reserved test images. This training is re- tify disks associated with craters, instead of rings. This peated until the test accuracy stops improving, or after 30 approach follows the same training methodology as the iterations. In Silburt et al. (2019), the CNN was trained ring nding CNN, but with a modi ed training dataset with 30,000 images of the Moon for 4 complete iterations and crater matching algorithm. To keep the compari- (120,000 images in total). For the Mars trained CNN son as close as possible I use the same image locations the test accuracy stopped improving after 8{10 iterations for both trained CNNs, and in the disk nding CDA I (200,000 to 250,000 images). The di erence in total num- convert crater features highlighted by the CNN to ring ber of images used does not necessarily translate to an structures before attempting to locate the craters. This improved CDA | The largest improvements occur early disk{ring conversion makes comparison easier between the in the training process, and Silburt et al. (2019) also used CNNs but is not necessarily an optimized algorithm for a larger 30,000 image test dataset that would have smaller the disk nding CDA. statistical uctuations in the accuracy metrics. The CNN does not produce a location or size for each 3.3. Training and Validation crater in the image but instead transforms the DTM image Training and validation follows the method outlined in into a binary image that highlights topographic features Silburt et al. (2019), and an example is given in gure 1. A that are related to craters. The CNN is best at highlight- sample image is taken from the dataset ( gure 1{left) and ing features that are between 10 and 60 pixels in diameter the locations of resolvable known craters are taken from in any particular image, resulting in a large number of the Robbins and Hynek (2012) and drawn as white pixels missing craters in each image. Small craters are repre- on an otherwise black `image' ( gure 1{center). The CNN sented by too few pixels to be positively identi ed. Large is then trained by exposure to a large number of images craters become di use or incomplete circles fall below the and trained to encode the DTM into the binary ring image detection threshold. In gure 1, Gale crater was among ( gure 1{center). Figure 1 is one of the 15 images in the the largest identi ed features, even though a few larger dataset that includes a majority of Gale crater in the image craters are visible in the image. { this gure is centered on 137 degrees east longitude, 8 degrees south longitude, at 3.2km/pixel scale. 4 Mars DEM Target DEM and craters -3 -3 -3 -6 -6 -6 -9 -9 -9 -12 -12 -12 -14 -14 -14 -17 -17 -17 131 134 136 139 142 145 131 134 136 139 142 145 131 134 136 139 142 145 Longitude Longitude Longitude Figure 1: Example DTM image (left),target map (center), and identi ed craters (right). The DTM is extracted from the source HRSC+MOLA map at 137E longitude, 8S latitude with a resolution of 18 pixels per degree (approximately 3.2 km/pixel). Gale crater is located at the center{top of the image, and is found by the CNN in this example. The right panel has a 4 pixel diameter cuto and craters near this threshold might appear in one catalog but not the other simply because of this strict cuto . Red circles show craters from the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset, blue circles show craters found by the CDA. 3.4. CNN Processing each image by identifying craters that are within 0.25 di- ameter units in size and within 0.25 diameter units in lo- The location and size of the craters in the CNN images cation of another crater. These values are smaller than are determined using the match template algorithm from those used by Silburt et al. (2019). scikit-image (van der Walt et al., 2014). The match template The result of this post-processing is a list of unique algorithm nds the location and size of each circular fea- craters found in each input image, before any comparison ture by maximizing its correlation with a template cir- with the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. In the right cle of known size. To allow comparison with the Silburt panel of gure 1 this post-processing produced the blue et al. (2019) study I keep the same threshold parameters circles, while the Robbins and Hynek (2012) craters with for the circle matching algorithm, though small improve- a diameter of at least 4 pixels are shown as red circles. ments may be possible with more extensive re{training of The disk{ nding CNN is trained to highlight craters the algorithm. For each crater map generated by the CNN by replacing the crater in the DTM with a solid disk in the location and size of craters are found with the following the binary image, instead of a ring surrounding the crater. steps: After the disk CNN has processed the DTM scene a Sobel 1. A candidate circle size is chosen and used to generate and Feldman (1968) transform is used to convert this disk a template image. into a ring to emulate the output of the ring{ nding CNN. 2. The candidate circle is compared against all loca- After this additional step, the analysis follows the ring tions in the binary crater image generated by the nding method above. CNN. The resulting map becomes a \heat map" of A potential downside of the disk nding method is correlation between the candidate circle and the tem- that overlapping craters are not easily separated. Over- plate. lapping craters found by the disk nding CNN are typ- ically represented as non circular features and therefore 3. Where the correlation between the crater map and are rejected by the circle matching algorithm. One possi- the candidate circle exceeds a con dence threshold ble improvement used by Stepinski et al. (2009) is to use a that location is identi ed as the crater location and pre{processing step to lter the images for preferred length the size of the candidate circle is used as a crater scales using a Gaussian blurring technique, this would bet- size. ter separate large and small craters regardless of their over- This template matching process is conducted for circles lap, but would not separate similarly sized overlapping with integer radii from 5 pixels to 40 pixels. For architec- craters. The disk nding algorithm is not recommended tural reasons the CNN rarely predicts craters smaller than as the only CDA for this reason. 10 pixels in diameter or larger than 60 pixels, with typical minimum and maximum diameters of 10 pixels and 30 pix- 3.5. Post Processing els, respectively. The circle matching algorithm performs The image dataset contains 55,000 images with reso- poorly for circles with a diameter smaller than 10 pixels lutions ranging from 150 pixels/degree to 4 pixels/degree where it considers di use segments of larger craters as po- covering the planet. As a result, a single location would tential small craters, resulting in 'rings' of small craters appear at up to 7 di erent resolutions in 15 6 images (the around larger craters. Duplicate craters are removed in Latitude variation is due to the use of overlapping images). For ex- and Hynek (2012) database, a False Positive is a crater in ample, Gale crater appears at 5 resolutions in 9 images. the CDA database without a matching crater in the Rob- Each of the 55,000 images is processed by the CNN bins and Hynek (2012) database, and a False Negative is a and template matching algorithm to nd craters indepen- crater in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database without dently of the other images. The location and size of each a matching crater in the CDA database. True Negatives crater is found in pixel space during the template match- are not used. ing stage and then converted into geographic coordinates Using these de nitions, the precision P is de ned as the using the known limits of each image and the orthographic ratio of true positive to all identi cations, and the recall R projection parameters. as the ratio of true positives to all craters in the Robbins As a result of the overlapping images and multiple reso- and Hynek (2012) database. lutions, single craters may be identi ed in multiple images and appear multiple times in the generated global crater list. Duplicate craters are removed by comparing the di- P = ; (1) T + F p p ameter and location of the crater with other craters with similar location and size, using the same parameters as in R = (2) T + F the last section. p n Figure 2 shows the 9 images that include more than Where T , F , and F are the numbers of true posi- p p n 50% of Gale crater. In this example, Gale crater was found tives, false positives, and false negatives, respectively. A in 5 images. The 5 candidate craters are combined in the high precision suggests the CDA has a high fractional true post-processing stage to provide 1 location and size for positive rate, while a high recall suggests the CDA nds a Gale crater, preferentially using the values found in the high fraction of the existing craters. highest resolution image. As an extreme example, the CDA could identify craters Once all duplicates are removed the nal result is a everywhere on Mars whether they exist or not, resulting database with approximately 60,000 craters found by the in a perfect recall (all craters are found) but almost no CDA. This list includes only craters larger than 4km in precision (many false positives are found). Alternatively, diameter, the lower limit allowed in the algorithm. Above the CDA could identify a single crater correctly, resulting this 4km limit, the ring CDAs found 75% of all craters in perfect precision (no false positives) but almost no recall listed in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. Above (many missing craters, or having many false negatives). A 10km diameter, the ring CDAs found more than 80% of all common metric used to balance the precision and recall is craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. The the harmonic average of the two metrics, commonly called algorithm itself has no lower limit in geophysical space the F score, but does have a lower limit in pixel space. The circle{ matching algorithm works well for circles 10 pixels in di- 2PR F = (3) ameter or larger and continues to work down to 6{pixel 1 P + R diameter circles but with a higher false positive rate. Ten where the same F value can be found using di erent com- pixels in diameter represents a physical limit of 4km in binations of precision and recall. None of these metrics re- diameter using the 400m/pixel scale images. As a com- ward identi cation of new craters that do not exist in the parison, Robbins and Hynek (2012) used 256 pixel/degree Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. All new identi ca- THEMIS infra-red imagery that covers more of the planet tions are assumed false positives and reduce the precision than the DTM used here and the crater size limit reported and F score. The possible new crater fraction N is cal- in Robbins and Hynek (2012) is 1km, corresponding to an culated as the ratio of false positives to the sum of false absolute minimum of 5 pixels in diameter at the equa- positive and Robbins and Hynek (2012) craters, tor. Robbins and Hynek (2013) suggested a lower diam- eter limit of 10km for MOLA derived DTM data, noting N = (4) that the higher resolution DTMs derived from HRSC are F + T P R better at resolving smaller craters. Where T is the number of true craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. This is an upper limit on the 3.6. Accuracy Metrics number of new craters found, and because the Robbins In each experiment, the performance of the CDA is and Hynek (2012) database is statistically complete below measured against the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database the 4km limit used here it is likely that many false positive using standard metrics. The crater locations in the CDA are genuine false positives and not new craters. In Silburt database and the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database are et al. (2019) a sample of the false positive craters was compared using the same methodology used to nd dupli- studied and they estimated that 89% of the false positive cate craters. If the CDA nds a crater within 0.25 diameter craters are new craters (11% are genuine false positives, units in location and size of a crater from the Robbins and Silburt et al. (2019) table 1). Hynek (2012) database then it is considered a match. A True Positive is a match between the CNN and Robbins 6 1 2 3 -4 -5 -5 -7 -10 -10 136 139 131 136 136 142 4 5 6 4 -6 1 -7 -17 -21 131 142 131 142 110 132 7 8 9 1 37 -5 -21 -7 -48 131 153 110 154 110 154 Longitude Figure 2: DTM images where more than 50% of Gale crater is contained in the image. Gale crater is highlighted with a red circle (using the Robbins and Hynek (2012) location) and a blue circle where it was identi ed by the CDA in each image. The CDA identi ed the crater in 5 images in this example data (4,5,7,8,9). The crater in images 1,2, and 3 is probably too big for the current algorithm. Image 2 and 6 only include partial circles and lie below the detection threshold. Latitude For further comparison with the Robbins and Hynek matches along the crater wall, or comparing candidate cir- (2012) database I also calculated the di erence in longi- cles against the space between two or more nearby craters if tude, latitude, and diameter between the CNN craters and the 'void' between the craters can be identi ed as a crater. Robbins and Hynek (2012) craters, both in pixel units and geophysical units. Each of these metrics is calculated as 4. Results the ratio relative to the smallest crater diameter in the comparison and given as the mean value and interquartile Table 1 gives the metrics for the three di erent exper- ranges for the dataset. iments. All of the metrics are calculated using the same source images but the training of each network is di erent. 3.7. Error Sources The \Moon" trained CDA uses the network generated by A few sources of error are present in the experiments, Silburt et al. (2019) with no further training. The \Mars" from observational constraints, pixelization of the source trained CDA uses the network trained on a subset of the data, and the algorithm design. martian crater catalog, where the network is trained to nd The source DTM combines HRSC and MOLA data at the crater rim. The \Disk" trained network is also trained a stated scale of 200m/pixel. However, this is obtained by on martian crater images, but is trained to nd the whole upsampling the MOLA data from 463m/pixel for 56% of disk of the crater, instead of just the rim. Table 1 includes the surface, and downsampling HRSC images for the re- data from 55,000 images derived from the global MOLA/ maining 44%. The smallest image scale used in this exper- HRSC DTM. As a comparison, the same crater match- iment was 400m/pixel, close to the MOLA laser footprint ing analysis was performed using the Salamuni ccar et al. of 300m, giving a accuracy limit of .4km in crater location (2012) catalog in comparison to the Robbins and Hynek and diameter (i.e., 1 pixel). (2012) catalog. In this case, the recall is 79% (21% of the The crater position is extracted by matching circular craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) catalog have no templates on images. The discrete nature of the images matching crater in the Salamuni ccar et al. (2012) catalog) limits the matches to 1 pixel in any image. At the highest and the precision is 92% (8% of the craters in the Sala- image resolution used this corresponds to the .4km accu- muni ccar et al. (2012) catalog have no matching crater in racy limit above, but in images with a larger pixel scale the Robbins and Hynek (2012) catalog). Equivalently, the the accuracy decreases at a corresponding rate. At the recall and precision of the Stepinski et al. (2011) crater 12.8km/pixel scale for the largest images, the accuracy catalog relative to Robbins and Hynek (2012) is 59% and drops to about 6km at the equator. In practical terms, a 50%, respectively. crater is likely to be found when it is between 10 pixels A smaller dataset using only images that were withheld and 30 pixels in diameter, making the 1 pixel uncertainty during the training phase for the Mars trained CNN is equivalent to a 3{10% error in position or diameter. When shown in table 2. None of the CDAs were shown the images the global CDA database is generated, the highest resolu- summarized in table 2 during training. tion image that included the crater detection was used When training machine{learning algorithms there is a to obtain the best overall position and size data for each risk of `over tting' where the algorithm becomes signi - crater in the nal dataset. For example, in the Gale crater cantly better (by some metric) on the dataset it is trained example in gure 2, image 4 or 5 would be used when with, at the expense of performing poorly on data it has calculating the location and size of the crater. not been shown. This over tting can be seen when the Projecting the DTM from Plate Care into orthographic precision (or recall, or F1 score) of the algorithm is much and back introduces some errors depending on the extent higher for a `training' dataset than an unseen `validation' of the image, as distortion increases away from the center dataset. Comparing the results in table 1 and 2, the met- point of the projection. Silburt et al. (2019) estimated an rics calculated for the validation dataset and the complete error of 2% in the crater size for typical images, which be- (validation and training) dataset suggests the networks are comes larger than the pixelization errors for craters larger not over tting the training data. This is reinforced by the than about 50 pixels in diameter. Few craters were found performance of the \Moon" trained CDA that has never larger than 30 pixels in diameter so the contribution of been trained using the Mars dataset. Di erences between this error is negligible. the global and validation metrics for this CDA re ect sta- Finally, algorithmic implementation also introduces some tistical di erences in the performance of the CDA on the uncertainty. In the CNN step, the image bit resolution two datasets. is limited to 8{bits of data, which for large images with In the following subsections I examine the performance vertically extended topography would obfuscate shallower of the CDA in more detail. The results are separated craters { 1km of vertical extent requires a vertical reso- by the type of detection: section 4.1 examines all CDA lution of 4m at best, while an image that includes Olym- crater detections in comparison to the Robbins and Hynek pus Mons and the surrounding terrain might be limited (2012) dataset; section 4.2 examines at the matched (true to 100m vertical resolution. In the template matching positives ) in the CDA datasets; section 4.3 examines the step, spurious matches can occur when comparing small craters missed by the CDA (false negatives ), and I use the candidate craters against large craters as the template extended data provided in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) 8 Moon Moon Mars Mars Disk Disk (image) (global) (image) (global) (image) (global) Crater count 9:9  10:0 57; 564 9:9  10:0 57; 564 9:9  10:0 57; 564 Craters detected 4:8  5:1 54; 739 4:9  5:2 57; 767 5:1  4:9 75; 733 Craters matched 4:3  4:7 42; 445 4:4  4:8 42; 891 4:3  4:7 39; 149 +2 +1 +2 +1 +2 +1 Latitude Error 4 2 4 2 4 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 Longitude Error 5 2 5 3 5 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 +3 +4 +3 +4 +4 +5 Diameter Error 6 5 7 6 9 6 3 3 3 3 4 3 Percentage new craters 5  8 18 5  8 21 7  11 39 Maximum diameter (pix) 34:1  20:0 33:5  19:8 32:7  18:9 Precision 90  18 78 89  19 74 84  23 52 Recall 42  21 74 43  21 75 44  23 68 F1 58  17 76 59  17 74 58  18 59 Table 1: Metrics calculated for three neural network based CDAs. \Moon trained" and \Mars trained" refer to the data used to train the initial model. \Disk" trained using Mars crater imagery in training, but identi ed disks associated with craters instead of crater \rings". All metrics were calculated using the same martian crater images from MOLA/HRSC. Values are given as mean  1 standard deviation (for single values after the ) or median  inter{quartile range (for two values after the ) as in Silburt et al. (2019). Precision, recall, and F scores are given as percentages. Each model appears twice, with the \image" column given the per image metrics aggregated over the ensemble of 55,000 images (after removing duplicates per image), and the \global" column gives the post-processed metrics (after removing duplicates globally). Moon Moon Mars Mars Disk Disk (image) (global) (image) (global) (image) (global) Crater count 8:1  5:3 32; 979 8:1  5:3 32; 979 8:1  5:3 32; 979 Craters detected 3:9  3:1 26; 808 4:0  3:2 28; 198 4:2  3:2 34; 419 Craters matched 3:4  2:9 21; 732 3:5  2:9 21; 985 3:5  2:9 19; 949 +2 +1 +2 +1 +2 +1 Latitude Error 4 2 4 1 4 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +2 Longitude Error 5 2 5 2 5 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 +3 +4 +3 +4 +5 +5 Diameter Error 6 5 7 6 8 6 3 3 3 3 4 3 Percentage new craters 4  8 13 5  8 16 8  11 30 Maximum diameter (pix) 34:1  20:3 33:6  20:2 32:6  19:1 Precision 90  18 81 89  19 78 83  24 58 Recall 42  22 66 43  22 67 44  23 60 F1 58  18 73 59  18 72 58  19 59 Table 2: Metrics calculated using the validation dataset as in table 1, but for a subset of the images not used in training the \Mars trained" or \Disk trained" networks. dataset to identify the characteristics of the those missing ameter. Craters below 4km are omitted from this dataset craters; nally, section 4.4 examines the craters found by because of the lack of DTM data that resolve these craters. the CDAs that do not exist in the Robbins and Hynek Table 3 gives the crater numbers in each of the geologic (2012) dataset { the false positives. unit types listed in Tanaka et al. (2014) for the 3 CDAs and the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. The numbers are 4.1. All Craters similar in the two ring{ nding CDAs and the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database, although there are craters listed First, I compare the complete dataset generated by in the CDA datasets that are not present in the Robbins CDAs to the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset. Figure and Hynek (2012) database (the TPR percentage shown 3 shows the crater distribution binned by diameter follow- in the table re ects this). The disk{ nding CDA tends to ing the power law distribution used in Robbins and Hynek nd many more craters in all geologic units and has more (2012), and shows good agreement between the CDAs and false positives (lower TPR) as a result. Figure 4 shows the the expected power law distribution. I used 16 bins per same results but binned by longitude and latitude instead octave (Robbins and Hynek, 2012) of crater size instead of geology. The two ring{ nding CDAs tend to under{ of the 2 bins used in (Stepinski et al., 2009) and Arvidson predict craters in regions with many craters, and over{ et al. (1979). The discretization present in the diameter predict in regions with few craters. The disk{ nding CDA measurements from the CDAs has been removed from the over{predicts the number of craters almost everywhere. data by applying a Gaussian noise multiplier (with magni- tude of 5%, smaller than the global mean diameter error in 4.2. Matched Craters table 1 of 7%) to each data point. With only 2 bins/octave (Arvidson et al., 1979) the distributions would agree with The Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset used here con- each other without the need for the de{aliasing jitter in tains 57,564 craters greater than 4km in diameter. The the CDA data. The peaks at 8km and 16km are residuals ring CDAs tested nd 75% of the craters in the Robbins of this jittering process and represent the smallest crater and Hynek (2012) dataset with a median di erence in lo- sizes found in the most common image resolutions used in cation of 2% and diameter of 5% measured in geophysi- the experiments. The CDA nds 80% of the craters larger cal units relative to the crater diameter. This di erence than 10 km diameter listed in the Robbins and Hynek is typical of variability between human analysts in crater (2012) database, and 75% of craters larger than 4km in di- studies (Robbins et al., 2014). In raw pixel terms, the dif- 9 6 Moon Moon Mars Mars Disk Disk Robbins Robbins 1 2 1 2 10 10 10 10 Diameter (km) Diameter (km) Figure 3: (left) Crater population as a function of crater diameter (km) for the datasets generated by the CDAs. (Right) R factor (Arvidson et al., 1979) for the same dataset. The raw dataset from the CDA contains aliasing due to the small number of image resolutions used in the algorithm. This discretization has be removed from the data by applying a random jitter to the crater sizes equal to 5%, smaller than the mean diameter error over all CDA datasets in table 1. Apron Basin Highland Impact Lowland Polar Transition Volcanic Robbins Count 116 467 41,749 3,016 2,858 660 3,587 5,112 Mars Count 128 585 40,181 3,129 3,322 911 3,645 5,866 TPR (%) 49 53 79 72 68 44 68 69 Moon Count 108 521 38,376 2,990 3,089 785 3,397 5,473 TPR (%) 56 58 81 76 73 52 72 74 Disk Count 218 1,008 48,328 4,020 5,314 1,389 5,716 9,740 TPR (%) 20 26 59 52 42 26 40 39 Table 3: Distribution of craters by geologic unit type given in Tanaka et al. (2014). The `Robbins' row gives the distribution of craters derived from craters in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. The True Positive Rate (TPR) gives the percentage of craters found by the CDA that exist in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. ferences in position and size between the CDA and Rob- tected craters. bins datasets are typically 1 or 2 pixels. The distribution In terms of geophysical location and size, the distribu- for each metric in pixel space is shown in gure 5, with tions of error in the longitude, latitude, and diameter of the median and inter-quartile ranges given in table 4. the matched craters are shown in gure 6, with median The ring trained CDAs and the disk trained CDA have and inter{quartile values given in table 1 and 2. After similar accuracy on the location but the opposite sign in aggregating the per{image metrics to produce the global the crater diameter di erences. This apparent bias may be dataset, the CDA errors decrease as duplicate craters are a result of the method used to generate each prediction, ltered for higher precision crater location determined us- as the disk{ nding CNN uses a Sobel and Feldman (1968) ing the highest resolution image. transform to convert the predicted disks into rings, and In the global dataset size errors decrease from 6% to places the ring within the perimeter of the disk, instead of 4% (medians) in the combined \Ring+Disk" CDA, but the on the outer edge. improvement comes at the expense of recall. In the glob- This bias can be reduced by combining the results from ally aggregated data, the recall of the combined dataset the ring trained CDA and disk trained CDA such that is worse (at 60%) than the recall of the worst individual only craters found by both CDAs are considered detec- CDA (the Disk CDA), while the precision is better (at tions. This is shown as the \Ring+Disk" result in table 80%) than the best CDA (the Mars CDA). The resulting 4 and gure 5. The absolute mean di erence in diameter F score drops to 69%, worse than the Mars Ring CDA between the CDA and Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset and better than the Mars Disk CDA. decreases from 0.5 pixels to 0.05 pixels. The trade{o for As a comparison with the errors shown here, Robbins this improved accuracy is that only craters found by both and Hynek (2008) performed a similar study using human{ CDAs can be improved, and the recall of the worst CDA derived datasets from MOLA DTMs and THEMIS im- limits the number of craters that can be improved. In agery and noted that the DTM derived crater sizes are typ- this dataset, 63% of the existing craters are found by both ically 1km larger than the imagery resolved counterparts. CDAs providing a smaller catalog of more con dently de- In this work the DTM derived crater sizes are 0.05km to Count R factor Moon Mars Disk Ring+Disk +0:4 +0:4 +0:4 +0:3 Horizontal (longitudinal) 0:6 0:7 0:6 0:7 0:4 0:4 0:4 0:3 +0:4 +0:4 +0:5 +0:3 Vertical (latitudinal) 0:1 0:03 0:06 0:009 0:4 0:4 0:5 0:4 +0:3 +0:3 +0:3 +0:3 Diameter 0:4 0:4 0:4 0:05 0:3 0:3 0:3 0:2 Table 4: Median and inter-quartile ranges for the image level di erences between the Robbins and Hynek (2012) crater database and the CDA predictions. All values are given as median and interquartile values of the pixel level di erences between the CDA and Robbins and Hynek (2012) data. 0.92km larger than the Robbins and Hynek (2012) data (25% to 75% percentiles) with the median crater being 0.44km larger. Twenty three percent of the DTM derived craters are smaller than their Robbins and Hynek (2012) counterpart. 4.3. Missed Craters Moon None of the CDAs found every crater in the Robbins 45 and Hynek (2012) list even if they found more than 57,564 craters in total. The missing craters don't need to share any characteristics but the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset includes a large number of parameters that might 90 illustrate why some craters were missed. In particular, the 180 90 0 90 180 Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset contains the depths Longitude for each crater, including the depth relative to the crater Mars edge (DEPTH RIMFLOOR), relative to the surrounding ter- rain (DEPTH SURFFLOOR), and the degradation/ preserva- tion state (DEGRADATION STATE) that rates the condition of the crater from highly{degraded (1) to not{degraded (4). A `random decision forest' algorithm (Ho, 1998) was used to identify these three parameters as most correlated with missing craters in this CDA relative to the Robbins 180 90 0 90 180 Longitude and Hynek (2012). Disk Comparing the Mars ring CDA with the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset (the other CDAs perform similarly), shallow craters are more likely to be missed than deep craters, and highly{degraded craters are more likely to be missed than non{degraded craters. For example craters with a rim- oor depth of 105m or less account for 15% of the dataset, but accounted for 36% of the missed craters. 180 90 0 90 180 Highly degraded craters made up 45% of all craters but Longitude 75% of the missed craters (all other degradation states have a false negative rate of less than 5%). When com- 4 2 0 2 4 bined, crater depth is a stronger determinant than the 4 2 craters/10 km degradation state. In all degradation states, shallower craters were more likely to be missed than deep craters. In the worst case of highly degraded craters, shallower Figure 4: Plate Car ee maps of the crater number predictions from the craters are missed at a rate 10 times higher than the deeper CDA relative to the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset, binned into 5 degree square bins and scaled to represent the number of craters craters. per 10,000 square kilometer predicted by each CDA in excess of the Examples of missed and detected craters are shown in Robbins and Hynek (2012) database. Positive numbers (reds) rep- gure 7. Some of the less degraded craters can be found resent an over{prediction by the CDA and negative numbers (blues) more easily in the THEMIS IR dataset used by Robbins represent an under{prediction. and Hynek (2012) because of the contrasting e ect of sun- light on the exposed edges of the crater. Although the impact of the degradation state and crater depth were not known during the training step of this ex- periment, the di erent crater types were well represented in the crater populations used in training and validation Latitude Latitude Latitude horizontal (pix) vertical (pix) Radius (pix) 1.0 1.0 1.0 Moon Moon Moon Mars Mars Mars Disk Disk Disk Ring+Disk Ring+Disk Ring+Disk 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 4 2 0 2 4 4 2 0 2 4 4 2 0 2 4 Error (pix) Error (pix) Error (pix) Figure 5: Distribution of pixel level di erences between the CDA crater detection and the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset. Two additional merged CDA datasets are also included. \Ring+Disk" includes craters found in both the Mars CDA and the Disk CDA. Density is given in units of "per pixel" and is normalized. Longitude Latitude Radius 0.25 0.25 0.25 Moon Moon Moon Mars Mars Mars Disk Disk Disk Ring+Disk Ring+Disk Ring+Disk 0.20 0.20 0.20 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.10 0.10 0.10 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 0 5 10 15 20 0 5 10 15 20 0 5 10 15 20 Error (%) Error (%) Error (%) Figure 6: Error density plots for craters found by each CDA with a matching crater in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset, given as the absolute fractional error relative to the crater diameter. (Left) Longitude errors, (center) latitude errors, (right) absolute diameter errors. Per{image statistics are shown with dashed lines, globally aggregated data is shown with solid lines The summary median and inter{quartile ranges for this data is given in table 1. Density Density Density Density Density Density 1-shallow-missed 2-shallow-missed 3-shallow-missed 4-shallow-missed 7.93 47.35 40.70 43.14 7.75 47.19 40.49 42.95 7.15 km 6.67 km 8.25 km 7.29 km 194.15 194.33 92.14 92.31 177.57 177.78 179.58 179.76 1-deep-missed 2-deep-missed 3-deep-missed 4-deep-missed -17.22 17.58 44.90 41.45 44.66 -17.41 17.42 41.27 7.29 km 6.35 km 9.30 km 7.04 km 44.23 44.41 338.60 338.77 210.16 210.40 328.07 328.25 1-shallow-matched 2-shallow-matched 3-shallow-matched 4-shallow-matched -0.76 21.19 43.08 6.72 6.55 -0.92 21.04 42.92 6.41 km 6.26 km 6.58 km 6.88 km 48.30 48.47 168.97 169.13 213.84 214.00 123.12 123.29 1-deep-matched 2-deep-matched 3-deep-matched 4-deep-matched -22.79 40.65 -2.78 3.52 -24.09 40.14 -3.02 3.37 51.28 km 20.21 km 9.59 km 6.19 km -25.39 39.63 40.63 41.93 43.23 47.55 48.06 48.57 275.12 275.37 25.14 25.29 Longitude Longitude Longitude Longitude Figure 7: Randomly selected examples of craters from each degradation state (columns) and depth (alternating rows) that were missed (top two rows) or matched (bottom two rows). Each image includes the crater at the center of the image, and a border of 1 crater width on each side. The shades in each image are indicative of local topography in the image, but not necessarily the images presented to the CDA. The red text in bottom left of each panel gives the diameter of the centered crater. The scale bar at the top right is 10km in all images, marked at 0,5,10km. Latitude Latitude Latitude Latitude datasets. If this were not the case, it might have been pos- crater catalog was less complete and 15% of the new de- sible to improve the performance of the CNN on the shal- tections by the (Silburt et al., 2019) CDA were below the low degraded craters by ensuring a representative sample lower limit of their \ground truth" database. Additionally, of these craters in the training dataset. the test posed in Silburt et al. (2019) is framed di erently, asking whether a human researcher would identify the fea- 4.4. False Positives ture as a crater, rather than asking whether the feature is The CDAs each detected craters that do not exist in actually a crater given all the available information. the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset that are consid- ered false positives. A large fraction of these detections 5. Conclusions were likely correctly identi ed as false positives (i.e., the craters do not exist), with a much smaller fraction being In this paper, I have applied a new Crater Detection real craters missing from the Robbins and Hynek (2012) Algorithm (CDA) to nd craters in Mars digital terrain dataset. model. The CDA combines a multi{layer neural network Table 3 gives the number of craters in each CDA and to highlight circular features and a template correlation the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset, grouped by geo- algorithm to determine their location and size. The best logic type (Tanaka et al., 2014). The table also gives the CDA used here nds 75% of the craters listed in a com- true positive rate or the fraction of craters in each CDA prehensive existing dataset (Robbins and Hynek, 2012), in that correspond to a known crater. The remaining craters line with typical human performance on similar datasets are the false positives. The relatively poor performance (Wetzler et al., 2007). I also showed that a CDA trained of the CDAs in the Apron, Basin, and Polar terrain only on lunar data (Silburt et al., 2019) performed well on the has a small impact on the overall results | These terrains martian DTMs without further training. account for less than 1,500 craters i The performance of each CDA was measured against Examples of false positives in the Mars ring dataset the Robbins and Hynek (2012) crater list, and the pre- are shown in gure 8, grouped by the crater diameter. dicted locations and sizes of craters compare well with that Some of the false positive detections have the appearance dataset. The ring nding CDAs nd craters over the en- of craters while others are not obviously circular features tire martian surface with no signi cant bias in location, (with 10,000+ false positives the small sample shown is size, or geology, and with di erences of around 5% of the random and not necessarily representative). For the larger crater size and location relative to the Robbins and Hynek detected features, many are paterae that are, correctly, not (2012) dataset, in line with estimated errors from human{ listed in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) crater catalog. Fif- generated crater datasets (Robbins et al., 2014). The disk teen of the 20 largest diameter `false positives' correspond nding CDA performs worse in general and is signi cantly to mountains or paterae, and another 20 of the next largest worse at nding craters in Impact, Basin, or Polar geologic 80 `false positive' detections are named features on Mars unit types than in the Highlands (Tanaka et al., 2014). that are not craters. The CDA is correct in identifying The best CDA developed here misses many existing these circular features in the DTM, but incorrect in la- craters, and misidenti es other features as craters. The belling them as craters. ring trained CDA missed 54% of those craters in the most For smaller sized features the results are less promising. degraded state, and 80% of those craters shallower than A review of a random sample of 300 features below 5km 105m from rim to oor. Given the large number of shallow in diameter did not identify any de nitively new craters craters missed, it might be possible to improve the perfor- | Approximately 30% were depressions related to valleys mance of the CNN stage by increasing the `contrast' of the or topography, but are not craters; 5% were detections of DTM images by limiting the vertical extent in each image, craters with a diameter of 4km in the CDA but below this similar to the pre{processing technique used in Stepinski threshold in the Robbins and Hynek (2012) dataset (and et al. (2009) to limit the horizontal scale of craters in each are therefore removed from the dataset) ; 5% of the craters image. are circular features in the DTM data, but disappear in A key feature of any automated CDA is the ability to higher resolution imagery. Most of the remaining 60% are make predictions rapidly and without human intervention. appropriately labelled as false positives and were not crater The CDA developed here can work with any standard like even in the available DTM data. Only a small number DTM dataset and can generate 100{1,000 crater predic- of samples are possibly new craters, resulting in fewer than tions per second on consumer hardware. DTMs generated 100 new crater detections in the CDA datasets. from high resolution imagery can be used to generate cat- Silburt et al. (2019) attempted to answer a similar alogs of craters not available in current databases (Lee, question by providing a sample of the false positives to 2018), and could be incorporated into existing data pro- researchers to categorize as crater or not. In that case cessing pipelines. The overall speed bene t produced by 89% were identi ed as new craters, in stark contrast to the the CDA depends on the number of manual corrections numbers here. However, according to Robbins and Hynek needed to create a nal catalog. With approximately 25% (2012) their database is statistically complete below the false positive rate and 25% false negative rate (the Mars lower limit of 4km considered here. For Lunar data, the 14 (6, 10]-new (10, 40]-new (40, 60]-new (60, 100]-new (100, 400]-new 2 3 4 5 15.23 3.53 -55.67 -8.59 -50.21 -50.35 14.55 2.73 -56.97 -8.67 -8.75 -50.49 13.86 1.93 -58.28 -8.83 -50.63 13.18 1.12 -59.58 54.18 km 63.53 km 102.90 km 6.36 km 11.14 km 136.43 136.51 136.60 136.68 173.85 173.99 174.13 174.27 350.44 351.12 351.81 352.49 132.03 132.83 133.63 134.44 50.75 52.05 53.35 54.65 (6, 10]-matched (10, 40]-matched (40, 60]-matched (60, 100]-matched (100, 400]-matched 6 7 8 9 10 -54.51 -1.45 -55.18 -30.35 -33.14 -54.64 -1.59 -55.75 -31.57 -34.75 -54.76 -1.73 -56.31 -32.79 -36.37 -54.88 -1.87 -56.87 -34.01 -37.99 9.56 km 11.12 km 44.61 km 96.46 km 127.89 km 358.01 358.13 358.26 358.38 90.26 90.41 90.55 90.69 218.03 218.59 219.16 219.72 183.46 184.68 185.90 187.12 321.09 322.71 324.33 325.95 Longitude Longitude Longitude Longitude Longitude Figure 8: (top row) false positives in the Mars trained dataset, (bottom) true positives in the Mars trained dataset. The feature size increases from left to right (with the diameter range given in the title in kilometres) but the feature is randomly chosen from the CDA dataset. As in gure 7 the identi ed crater is centered in the image with a 1 diameter border around it and red text in bottom left of each panel gives the diameter of the centered crater. The scale bar at the top right is 10km in all images, marked at 0,5,10km. (image 5 is Peneus Patera.) trained ring CDA), 1 in 4 proposed craters would be re- 10.1016/j.ascom.2017.01.002. URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ j.ascom.2017.01.002. jected by an expert human classi er, and 1 in 4 craters R. Arvidson, J. Boyce, C. Chapman, M. Cintala, M. Fulchignoni, would need to be identi ed in the DTMs or by combining H. Moore, P. Schultz, L. Soderblom, R. Strom, A. Woronow, and the catalog with other sources. Given the time required to R. Young. Standard techniques for presentation and analysis of crater size-frequency data. Icarus, 37(2):467{474, 1979. 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