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Reflections On the Anomalous ANITA Events: The Antarctic Subsurface as a Possible Explanation

Reflections On the Anomalous ANITA Events: The Antarctic Subsurface as a Possible Explanation IPMU19-0070 Re ections On the Anomalous ANITA Events: The Antarctic Subsurface as a Possible Explanation 1 2, 3 4 Ian M. Shoemaker, Alexander Kusenko, Peter Kuipers Munneke, 5 6 7 Andrew Romero-Wolf, Dustin M. Schroeder, and Martin J. Siegert Center for Neutrino Physics, Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547, USA Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), UTIAS The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583, Japan Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Grantham Institute and Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK (Dated: May 9, 2019) The ANITA balloon experiment was designed to detect radio signals initiated by neutrinos and cosmic ray air showers. These signals are typically discriminated by the polarization and phase inversions of the radio signal. The re ected signal from cosmic rays su er phase inversion compared to a direct tau neutrino event. In this paper we study sub-surface re ection, which can occur without phase inversion, in the context of the two anomalous up-going events reported by ANITA. We nd that subsurface layers and rn density inversions may plausibly account for the events, while ice fabric layers and wind ablation crusts could also play a role. This hypothesis can be tested with radar surveying of the Antarctic region in the vicinity of the anomalous ANITA events. Future experiments should not use phase inversion as a sole criterion to discriminate between downgoing and upgoing events, unless the subsurface re ection properties are well understood. I. INTRODUCTION IceCube [5]. A number of new physics explanations for the anomaly have been proposed [6{17]. In this Letter, we study the possibility that the myste- The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) rious events are explained by the radio signals originat- collaboration reports two unusual steeply pointed up- 18 ing from downward-going CR-initiated EAS re ected by going air showers with energies near the EeV (10 eV) some subsurface features in the Antarctic ice which allow scale [1, 2]. Additionally ANITA has observed  30 for re ections without a phase inversion. Phase inversion events from cosmic rays (CRs) [1{3]. Most of the CR occurs when the radio waves traveling in a medium with events appearing to originate from the Earth display a a low index of refraction (air) re ect from an interface characteristic phase reversal consistent with the interpre- with a medium that has a high index of refraction (ice). tation that the signal originated from a downward-going However, if the re ection occurs below the surface, for CR-initiated extensive air shower (EAS) re ected by the example from an interface of a high-density layer on top Antarctic surface. However, the two anomalous upgoing and a low-density layer on the bottom, there is no phase EASs reported by ANITA [1, 2] lack phase inversion, and inversion. We will identify the properties of the Antarctic they appear to be inconsistent with such surface re ec- ice that are required for the radio signal from an ordinary tions. CR air shower to undergo a re ection without a phase in- Qualitatively, these events look like air showers initi- version, and we will also identify the features known to ated by an energetic particle that emerges from the ice. exist in Antarctic ice that can be responsible for such It has been proposed that tau neutrinos interacting in re ections capable to explain the ANITA events. the ice could produce a tau lepton that exits upward to General Features of Subsurface Re ectors. ANITA re- the atmosphere and subsequently decays producing an air ports 33 events with phases consistent with the expecta- shower. Since radio signal from such an event undergoes tions from cosmic ray induced ultra-high energy cosmic no re ection, it would be consistent with the observed ray (UHECR) EAS events [1{3, 18]. We compute the lack the phase inversion. The problem with this hypoth- number of events above detection threshold E in an thr esis, however, is that neutrinos with EeV energies are observing time, T , re ecting from either surface of sub- expected to interact inside Earth with a high probabil- surface features with area coverage, A , as ity. For the angles inferred from the observed events, the ice would be well screened from upgoing neutrinos by the N ' A T  (E)dE (1) underlying layers of Earth. While the neutrino interac- e thr tion cross sections at high energies are uncertain [4], the observed events would require neutrino uxes well in ex- 0 thr = A T  ; cess of upper limits from Pierre Auger Observatory and ( 1)E E 0 0 arXiv:1905.02846v1 [astro-ph.HE] 7 May 2019 2 features should occupy an area A R N e surf: anom: ' ; (4) A (1 R ) R N e surf: sub: CR where in order to account for ANITA's observations one needs, N = 33 and N = 2. We plot the requisite CR anom: area estimate from Eq. (4) in Fig. 1 as a function of the subsurface index of refraction assuming that the top layer has n = 1:3. In summary, a relevant candidate subsurface feature needs to satisfy the following requirements: 1. In accordance with the estimate in Fig. 1, & 7% of the area should host a re ector at some depth. FIG. 1: The required area coverage of a subsurface re ector as a function of the sub-surface index of refraction, n . Three sub 2. There should not be signi cant attenuation for the incidence angles are shown: incident angles of 55 (roughly EAS radio pulse above the re ecting feature, since this corresponding to the anomalous event [2]), 70 (roughly the would render the signal undetectable. Roughly, if the average angle for ANITA CRs), and 80 (which is on the high detected anomalous event was attenuated by . 0:2, end of incident angles for the ANITA CR events). Here it is the resulting eld amplitude would drop below the assumed that the surface has n = 1:3. trigger threshold [5]. Since the attenuation length for radio waves in ice is (1.2{1.5) km (with some tem- perature dependence [20]) for the frequencies probed where we take the CR ux to be a power-law, (E) ' by ANITA, this requirement is satis ed by any fea- (E=E ) with ' 2:7. This allows us to estimate 0 0 tures not obstructed by an overlying layer of liquid the total number of ordinary EAS events from the surface water. (The attenuation length in liquid water is much re ection (with phase inversion): shorter [21].) N ' A T  R  ; (2) CR e surf: CR 3. The re ection must occur without a phase inversion. A subsurface interface with a higher index of refraction 0 thr where we de ne  , R is the above and a lower index of refraction below can re ect CR surf: ( 1)E E 0 0 a signal without a phase inversion. Likewise, multiple surface re ection coecient, and A is the e ective area layers of variable index of refraction can re ect a signal surveyed by ANITA in ight time T . without a phase shift [22]. Similarly we estimate the anomalous uninverted radio events from subsurface re ection of EAS. The subsur- 4. Given the wavelengths ANITA is sensitive to, the sub- face re ections may occur only for incidence angles small surface layer above the re ecting interface needs to be enough, so that the power transmitted into the ice at the suciently thick, although the layer below the inter- air-ice interface is signi cant. For the rn index of re- face can be quite small [23]. Similarly, the features fraction, the power transmitted downward exceeds 80% should be >20 m in diameter [24]. Lastly these sur- if the incidence angle is smaller than 70 . We note that faces likely need to be tilted with respect to the sur- the incident angles of the anomalous ANITA events are face, such that double re ections are rare. well below this upper bound and, in fact, these angles are smaller than the average incidence angle of the cos- Given these requirements, we now proceed to investi- mic ray events [19]. Therefore one can estimate the rate gate which glaciological candidates may have the correct of anomalous events as distribution and re ective properties. Subsurface features that may have the right proper- N ' A T  (1 R ) R  (3) anom: e surf: sub: CR ties to account for the anomalous ANITA events include several possibilities. where R is the subsurface re ection coecient, and sub: A is the area of the re ecting subsurface. The es- (a) Double Layers: Intriguingly, the work of Ref. [26] timates in Eqs. (2) and (3) imply that the subsurface nds direct evidence for re ective surfaces without phase inversions. In particular, they nd evidence for \thin double layers of ice over hoar" which have re- ection without inversion, and conclude that they are A priori, there is no reason to assume that A is small. In \extensive" throughout West Antarctica. They model general, A could exceed A , especially if several layers at e e the observed re ections as high-permittivity ice sitting di erent depths are contributing to the subsurface re ections. above low-permittivity hoar. The modeling done indi- However, to explain the ANITA events, only a small fraction of ice needs to host the re ecting features. cates that hoar thickness uctuations is a major driver 3 ����������� 1.0 ���-����� ������������� 0.8 0.6 0.4 ����� �������������� 0.1 0.5 1 5 10 ���������� [�] FIG. 2: Left panel: An example Ice Core sample from the East Antarctic Plateau [25]. Here the black curve shows the density from a dielectric pro ling (DEP) technique, while the red shows the result from high-resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT). Right panel: Re ection coecients (in power) for scattering from a multilayered medium as a function of wavelength. The red curve is calculated assuming regularly spaced layers of 10 cm thickness, whereas the blue curve assumes layers whose thickness is randomly chosen between 3-15 cm. of the phase of the wavelet. These results were ob- izations). The ice core sample displayed in Fig. 2 has tained with 400 MHz short pulse radar (ANITA is in just this structure, consisting of a number of thin layers the 200-800 MHz range). with small index of refraction di erences. Motivated by this, we display two calculations of the re ection coe- (b) Firn Density Inversions : In Ref. [27, 28], the au- cients in Fig. 2. In one case (the red curve) we compute thors produced an estimate of snow and rn density (in re ection from a medium consisting of regularly spaced the top 100 m of depth) on Antarctica for the period layers of 10 cm thickness. This results in a sharp res- 1979-2017 at a horizontal resolution of (27  27) km onance feature, as expected [29]. In contrast, the blue and a temporal resolution of 10-15 days, using a rn curve assumes layers whose thickness is randomly cho- model that includes not only compaction, but also rn sen between 3-15 cm. In both instances the layers alter- hydrology including melt, percolation and refreezing. nating refraction indices, chosen between n = 1:3 and The model in [27, 28] has been evaluated at the two lo- n = 1:6 for a 60 incidence angle. We have explicitly cations of the observed ANITA events. Although there computed the phase change in re ections from regular are minor variations in density due of dependence of and random layers, and found that the phase shifts are densi cation on temperature following the annual cy- close to zero for the range of wavelengths with maximal cle, these variations are quite small, and are not large re ectivity, in agreement with the results of Ref. [22] for enough to explain the ANITA observations. However, regular layers. We note that re ections from multiple there are additional rn features not accounted for in layers will induce a time delay, impacting the measured this model. time pro le of the pulse. This makes a multi-layer re- For example, ice core samples show substantial density ection interpretation of the event reported in Ref. [2] and permittivity variations. We show as an example unlikely, though it may be a candidate explanation for in the left panel of Fig. 2 the density pro le from the the event in Ref. [1]. East Antarctic Plateau [25]. These density variations are quite substantial and may constitute a plausible (c) Wind/ablation crusts and Sastrugi: These are candidate for the ANITA events, and they are rather abundant in megadune regions, and may create low common in the area sampled in Ref. [25]. density regions with large grains above higher density It is well-known that the constructive interference ef- snow. Sastrugi are essentially wind eroded snow, which fects from scattering on a medium consisting of multi- make irregular ridges on the surface. Given that these ple thin layers can produce a large re ection coecient regions have a variety of slopes as well, they naturally at some wavelengths [29] (see also [30, 31] for general- help explain the lack of double-re ections. By some ���� ������ 4 estimates, as much as 11% of the East Antarctic Ice (g) Englacial Layers: At depths beyond the rn (though Sheet is covered by so-called \wind glaze" [32], form- still . 1 km), dielectric contrasts in the ice may be suf- ing a surface with a polished appearance with nearly ciently common to explain the events [24, 41]. More- zero accumulation due to persistent winds. This could over, in principle density contrasts in deep englacial produce both the needed re ection phase and range of layers qualitatively similar to what is displayed in Fig. 2 angles. Since these wind crusts are denser than typi- may also source strong re ection coecients. cal snow, they would naturally have larger indices of refraction than typical surface snow. Future probes of subsurface re ections can be designed to de nitively test the origin of ANITA events and to (d) Ice Fabric Layers: Ice sheet fabrics are formed as a learn about the properties of Antarctic ice. This can result of rheology and stress, leading to macroscopic be done (1) using dedicated survey, and/or (2) digging. ice crystal alignment. Some fabrics appear to have the Though radio surveying is likely more feasible, we leave right dielectric properties to produce a re ection with- a dedicated analysis of these possibilities to future work. out phase inversion even without index of refraction If subsurface features are ultimately responsible for the contrasts [33]. In this case it is the contrasts in crys- ANITA events, the distribution and extent of such fea- tal orientation fabric that source strong re ections [33]. tures will be important for ANITA going forward. More- The spatial distribution of ice-sheet fabric is not very over, a dedicated e ort to determine if the ANITA events well known since ice cores are restricted in number and originate from a subsurface re ector may be relevant for distribution across Antarctica [34]. There is some indi- glaciology by providing additional information such as cation that ice fabric layers are more widespread than the extent, spatial distribution, and re ective properties originally believed [34{36], which make it plausible that of these features. the distribution is widespread enough to produce the To summarize, we have examined the possibility of the observed re ections. anomalous upward-going ANITA events as originating (e) Subglacial Lakes: Most lakes appear to be hydrostat- from ordinary CR initiated air showers. For this to be ically sealed, and therefore lack an air-water interface consistent with the phase information ANITA observes, which would otherwise provide a useful re ecting sur- they must re ect from a subsurface feature without phase face without phase inversion. The bottom of the lake inversion. We have surveyed a number of glaciological could in principle work, but only rather shallow and candidates in order to determine which of these have the low conductivity subglacial lake regions [37] would be correct properties to explain ANITA's observations. We able to produce a re ection without signi cant attenua- have found that sunsurface double layers and rn density tion in water. Exploiting the time delay and amplitude inversions are a plausible explanation of the anomalous attenuation in water, radio echo surveys provided the events. In order to conclusively test if surface/subsurface rst direct evidence for that subglacial lakes were at glaciological candidates are responsible for the ANITA least several meters deep [38]. Recent model estimates events, more information is needed on candidate location, suggest that (0:6 0:2)% of the Antarctic ice/bed in- fraction of occurrence in the area sampled by ANITA and terface is covered by subglacial lakes [39]. Given that a more detailed analysis of the ANITA acceptance. We subglacial lakes tend to lack a water-air boundary and note that, while rn density contrasts appear to be a that they cover < 1% of the Antarctic area, we do plausible candidate, one or more of the other glaciologi- not consider these especially promising candidates for cal features discussed here may play a sub-dominant role ANITA. We note however the possibility that impuri- in sourcing strong un-inverted re ections. ties in the accreted ice above a lake could in principle Our results have broad implications for future neutrino produce a higher index of refraction layer above a lower and cosmic ray experiments. Given the possibility of re- index layer, though is likely uncommon. We note that ections without a phase inversion, future experiments the ice above Lake Vostok has been found to contain should not use the phase inversion in radio signals as a ice fabric contrasts, which could source strong re ec- sole criterion for discriminating between downgoing and tions [40]. If the appearance of ice fabrics is common upgoing events, unless the properties of the subsurface above subglacial lakes, they may be anomalous re ec- re ection are well understood. tion candidates. However, such lakes could not be too deep since the signal would be too attenuated other- wise. Acknowledgements (f ) Snow covered crevasses/hollow caves/ice bridges: An ice-to-air boundary would have the cor- We are very grateful to Thomas Laepple for provid- rect properties for re ection without phase inversion. ing the B41 ice core data from Ref. [25]. Furthermore, However, fumarolic and volcanic ice caves do not we warmly acknowledge helpful discussions with Kumiko seem to be suciently common for the ANITA events. Azuma, Dmitry Chirkin, Francis Halzen, Stefan Ligten- Crevasses are common in regions of fast ow, but not berg, Henning Loewe, and David Saltzberg. The work are not common in the middle of the ice sheet where of I.M.S. is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy the ANITA events are observed. under the award number DE-SC0019163. The work of 5 A.K. was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technol- Grant No. DE-SC0009937, and by the World Premier ogy, under a contract with the National Aeronautics International Research Center Initiative (WPI), MEXT, and Space Administration. P.K.M. is supported by the Japan. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Netherlands Earth System Science Centre (NESSC). [1] ANITA collaboration, P. W. 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Reflections On the Anomalous ANITA Events: The Antarctic Subsurface as a Possible Explanation

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IPMU19-0070 Re ections On the Anomalous ANITA Events: The Antarctic Subsurface as a Possible Explanation 1 2, 3 4 Ian M. Shoemaker, Alexander Kusenko, Peter Kuipers Munneke, 5 6 7 Andrew Romero-Wolf, Dustin M. Schroeder, and Martin J. Siegert Center for Neutrino Physics, Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547, USA Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), UTIAS The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583, Japan Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 USA Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Grantham Institute and Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK (Dated: May 9, 2019) The ANITA balloon experiment was designed to detect radio signals initiated by neutrinos and cosmic ray air showers. These signals are typically discriminated by the polarization and phase inversions of the radio signal. The re ected signal from cosmic rays su er phase inversion compared to a direct tau neutrino event. In this paper we study sub-surface re ection, which can occur without phase inversion, in the context of the two anomalous up-going events reported by ANITA. We nd that subsurface layers and rn density inversions may plausibly account for the events, while ice fabric layers and wind ablation crusts could also play a role. This hypothesis can be tested with radar surveying of the Antarctic region in the vicinity of the anomalous ANITA events. Future experiments should not use phase inversion as a sole criterion to discriminate between downgoing and upgoing events, unless the subsurface re ection properties are well understood. I. INTRODUCTION IceCube [5]. A number of new physics explanations for the anomaly have been proposed [6{17]. In this Letter, we study the possibility that the myste- The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) rious events are explained by the radio signals originat- collaboration reports two unusual steeply pointed up- 18 ing from downward-going CR-initiated EAS re ected by going air showers with energies near the EeV (10 eV) some subsurface features in the Antarctic ice which allow scale [1, 2]. Additionally ANITA has observed  30 for re ections without a phase inversion. Phase inversion events from cosmic rays (CRs) [1{3]. Most of the CR occurs when the radio waves traveling in a medium with events appearing to originate from the Earth display a a low index of refraction (air) re ect from an interface characteristic phase reversal consistent with the interpre- with a medium that has a high index of refraction (ice). tation that the signal originated from a downward-going However, if the re ection occurs below the surface, for CR-initiated extensive air shower (EAS) re ected by the example from an interface of a high-density layer on top Antarctic surface. However, the two anomalous upgoing and a low-density layer on the bottom, there is no phase EASs reported by ANITA [1, 2] lack phase inversion, and inversion. We will identify the properties of the Antarctic they appear to be inconsistent with such surface re ec- ice that are required for the radio signal from an ordinary tions. CR air shower to undergo a re ection without a phase in- Qualitatively, these events look like air showers initi- version, and we will also identify the features known to ated by an energetic particle that emerges from the ice. exist in Antarctic ice that can be responsible for such It has been proposed that tau neutrinos interacting in re ections capable to explain the ANITA events. the ice could produce a tau lepton that exits upward to General Features of Subsurface Re ectors. ANITA re- the atmosphere and subsequently decays producing an air ports 33 events with phases consistent with the expecta- shower. Since radio signal from such an event undergoes tions from cosmic ray induced ultra-high energy cosmic no re ection, it would be consistent with the observed ray (UHECR) EAS events [1{3, 18]. We compute the lack the phase inversion. The problem with this hypoth- number of events above detection threshold E in an thr esis, however, is that neutrinos with EeV energies are observing time, T , re ecting from either surface of sub- expected to interact inside Earth with a high probabil- surface features with area coverage, A , as ity. For the angles inferred from the observed events, the ice would be well screened from upgoing neutrinos by the N ' A T  (E)dE (1) underlying layers of Earth. While the neutrino interac- e thr tion cross sections at high energies are uncertain [4], the observed events would require neutrino uxes well in ex- 0 thr = A T  ; cess of upper limits from Pierre Auger Observatory and ( 1)E E 0 0 arXiv:1905.02846v1 [astro-ph.HE] 7 May 2019 2 features should occupy an area A R N e surf: anom: ' ; (4) A (1 R ) R N e surf: sub: CR where in order to account for ANITA's observations one needs, N = 33 and N = 2. We plot the requisite CR anom: area estimate from Eq. (4) in Fig. 1 as a function of the subsurface index of refraction assuming that the top layer has n = 1:3. In summary, a relevant candidate subsurface feature needs to satisfy the following requirements: 1. In accordance with the estimate in Fig. 1, & 7% of the area should host a re ector at some depth. FIG. 1: The required area coverage of a subsurface re ector as a function of the sub-surface index of refraction, n . Three sub 2. There should not be signi cant attenuation for the incidence angles are shown: incident angles of 55 (roughly EAS radio pulse above the re ecting feature, since this corresponding to the anomalous event [2]), 70 (roughly the would render the signal undetectable. Roughly, if the average angle for ANITA CRs), and 80 (which is on the high detected anomalous event was attenuated by . 0:2, end of incident angles for the ANITA CR events). Here it is the resulting eld amplitude would drop below the assumed that the surface has n = 1:3. trigger threshold [5]. Since the attenuation length for radio waves in ice is (1.2{1.5) km (with some tem- perature dependence [20]) for the frequencies probed where we take the CR ux to be a power-law, (E) ' by ANITA, this requirement is satis ed by any fea- (E=E ) with ' 2:7. This allows us to estimate 0 0 tures not obstructed by an overlying layer of liquid the total number of ordinary EAS events from the surface water. (The attenuation length in liquid water is much re ection (with phase inversion): shorter [21].) N ' A T  R  ; (2) CR e surf: CR 3. The re ection must occur without a phase inversion. A subsurface interface with a higher index of refraction 0 thr where we de ne  , R is the above and a lower index of refraction below can re ect CR surf: ( 1)E E 0 0 a signal without a phase inversion. Likewise, multiple surface re ection coecient, and A is the e ective area layers of variable index of refraction can re ect a signal surveyed by ANITA in ight time T . without a phase shift [22]. Similarly we estimate the anomalous uninverted radio events from subsurface re ection of EAS. The subsur- 4. Given the wavelengths ANITA is sensitive to, the sub- face re ections may occur only for incidence angles small surface layer above the re ecting interface needs to be enough, so that the power transmitted into the ice at the suciently thick, although the layer below the inter- air-ice interface is signi cant. For the rn index of re- face can be quite small [23]. Similarly, the features fraction, the power transmitted downward exceeds 80% should be >20 m in diameter [24]. Lastly these sur- if the incidence angle is smaller than 70 . We note that faces likely need to be tilted with respect to the sur- the incident angles of the anomalous ANITA events are face, such that double re ections are rare. well below this upper bound and, in fact, these angles are smaller than the average incidence angle of the cos- Given these requirements, we now proceed to investi- mic ray events [19]. Therefore one can estimate the rate gate which glaciological candidates may have the correct of anomalous events as distribution and re ective properties. Subsurface features that may have the right proper- N ' A T  (1 R ) R  (3) anom: e surf: sub: CR ties to account for the anomalous ANITA events include several possibilities. where R is the subsurface re ection coecient, and sub: A is the area of the re ecting subsurface. The es- (a) Double Layers: Intriguingly, the work of Ref. [26] timates in Eqs. (2) and (3) imply that the subsurface nds direct evidence for re ective surfaces without phase inversions. In particular, they nd evidence for \thin double layers of ice over hoar" which have re- ection without inversion, and conclude that they are A priori, there is no reason to assume that A is small. In \extensive" throughout West Antarctica. They model general, A could exceed A , especially if several layers at e e the observed re ections as high-permittivity ice sitting di erent depths are contributing to the subsurface re ections. above low-permittivity hoar. The modeling done indi- However, to explain the ANITA events, only a small fraction of ice needs to host the re ecting features. cates that hoar thickness uctuations is a major driver 3 ����������� 1.0 ���-����� ������������� 0.8 0.6 0.4 ����� �������������� 0.1 0.5 1 5 10 ���������� [�] FIG. 2: Left panel: An example Ice Core sample from the East Antarctic Plateau [25]. Here the black curve shows the density from a dielectric pro ling (DEP) technique, while the red shows the result from high-resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT). Right panel: Re ection coecients (in power) for scattering from a multilayered medium as a function of wavelength. The red curve is calculated assuming regularly spaced layers of 10 cm thickness, whereas the blue curve assumes layers whose thickness is randomly chosen between 3-15 cm. of the phase of the wavelet. These results were ob- izations). The ice core sample displayed in Fig. 2 has tained with 400 MHz short pulse radar (ANITA is in just this structure, consisting of a number of thin layers the 200-800 MHz range). with small index of refraction di erences. Motivated by this, we display two calculations of the re ection coe- (b) Firn Density Inversions : In Ref. [27, 28], the au- cients in Fig. 2. In one case (the red curve) we compute thors produced an estimate of snow and rn density (in re ection from a medium consisting of regularly spaced the top 100 m of depth) on Antarctica for the period layers of 10 cm thickness. This results in a sharp res- 1979-2017 at a horizontal resolution of (27  27) km onance feature, as expected [29]. In contrast, the blue and a temporal resolution of 10-15 days, using a rn curve assumes layers whose thickness is randomly cho- model that includes not only compaction, but also rn sen between 3-15 cm. In both instances the layers alter- hydrology including melt, percolation and refreezing. nating refraction indices, chosen between n = 1:3 and The model in [27, 28] has been evaluated at the two lo- n = 1:6 for a 60 incidence angle. We have explicitly cations of the observed ANITA events. Although there computed the phase change in re ections from regular are minor variations in density due of dependence of and random layers, and found that the phase shifts are densi cation on temperature following the annual cy- close to zero for the range of wavelengths with maximal cle, these variations are quite small, and are not large re ectivity, in agreement with the results of Ref. [22] for enough to explain the ANITA observations. However, regular layers. We note that re ections from multiple there are additional rn features not accounted for in layers will induce a time delay, impacting the measured this model. time pro le of the pulse. This makes a multi-layer re- For example, ice core samples show substantial density ection interpretation of the event reported in Ref. [2] and permittivity variations. We show as an example unlikely, though it may be a candidate explanation for in the left panel of Fig. 2 the density pro le from the the event in Ref. [1]. East Antarctic Plateau [25]. These density variations are quite substantial and may constitute a plausible (c) Wind/ablation crusts and Sastrugi: These are candidate for the ANITA events, and they are rather abundant in megadune regions, and may create low common in the area sampled in Ref. [25]. density regions with large grains above higher density It is well-known that the constructive interference ef- snow. Sastrugi are essentially wind eroded snow, which fects from scattering on a medium consisting of multi- make irregular ridges on the surface. Given that these ple thin layers can produce a large re ection coecient regions have a variety of slopes as well, they naturally at some wavelengths [29] (see also [30, 31] for general- help explain the lack of double-re ections. By some ���� ������ 4 estimates, as much as 11% of the East Antarctic Ice (g) Englacial Layers: At depths beyond the rn (though Sheet is covered by so-called \wind glaze" [32], form- still . 1 km), dielectric contrasts in the ice may be suf- ing a surface with a polished appearance with nearly ciently common to explain the events [24, 41]. More- zero accumulation due to persistent winds. This could over, in principle density contrasts in deep englacial produce both the needed re ection phase and range of layers qualitatively similar to what is displayed in Fig. 2 angles. Since these wind crusts are denser than typi- may also source strong re ection coecients. cal snow, they would naturally have larger indices of refraction than typical surface snow. Future probes of subsurface re ections can be designed to de nitively test the origin of ANITA events and to (d) Ice Fabric Layers: Ice sheet fabrics are formed as a learn about the properties of Antarctic ice. This can result of rheology and stress, leading to macroscopic be done (1) using dedicated survey, and/or (2) digging. ice crystal alignment. Some fabrics appear to have the Though radio surveying is likely more feasible, we leave right dielectric properties to produce a re ection with- a dedicated analysis of these possibilities to future work. out phase inversion even without index of refraction If subsurface features are ultimately responsible for the contrasts [33]. In this case it is the contrasts in crys- ANITA events, the distribution and extent of such fea- tal orientation fabric that source strong re ections [33]. tures will be important for ANITA going forward. More- The spatial distribution of ice-sheet fabric is not very over, a dedicated e ort to determine if the ANITA events well known since ice cores are restricted in number and originate from a subsurface re ector may be relevant for distribution across Antarctica [34]. There is some indi- glaciology by providing additional information such as cation that ice fabric layers are more widespread than the extent, spatial distribution, and re ective properties originally believed [34{36], which make it plausible that of these features. the distribution is widespread enough to produce the To summarize, we have examined the possibility of the observed re ections. anomalous upward-going ANITA events as originating (e) Subglacial Lakes: Most lakes appear to be hydrostat- from ordinary CR initiated air showers. For this to be ically sealed, and therefore lack an air-water interface consistent with the phase information ANITA observes, which would otherwise provide a useful re ecting sur- they must re ect from a subsurface feature without phase face without phase inversion. The bottom of the lake inversion. We have surveyed a number of glaciological could in principle work, but only rather shallow and candidates in order to determine which of these have the low conductivity subglacial lake regions [37] would be correct properties to explain ANITA's observations. We able to produce a re ection without signi cant attenua- have found that sunsurface double layers and rn density tion in water. Exploiting the time delay and amplitude inversions are a plausible explanation of the anomalous attenuation in water, radio echo surveys provided the events. In order to conclusively test if surface/subsurface rst direct evidence for that subglacial lakes were at glaciological candidates are responsible for the ANITA least several meters deep [38]. Recent model estimates events, more information is needed on candidate location, suggest that (0:6 0:2)% of the Antarctic ice/bed in- fraction of occurrence in the area sampled by ANITA and terface is covered by subglacial lakes [39]. Given that a more detailed analysis of the ANITA acceptance. We subglacial lakes tend to lack a water-air boundary and note that, while rn density contrasts appear to be a that they cover < 1% of the Antarctic area, we do plausible candidate, one or more of the other glaciologi- not consider these especially promising candidates for cal features discussed here may play a sub-dominant role ANITA. We note however the possibility that impuri- in sourcing strong un-inverted re ections. ties in the accreted ice above a lake could in principle Our results have broad implications for future neutrino produce a higher index of refraction layer above a lower and cosmic ray experiments. Given the possibility of re- index layer, though is likely uncommon. We note that ections without a phase inversion, future experiments the ice above Lake Vostok has been found to contain should not use the phase inversion in radio signals as a ice fabric contrasts, which could source strong re ec- sole criterion for discriminating between downgoing and tions [40]. If the appearance of ice fabrics is common upgoing events, unless the properties of the subsurface above subglacial lakes, they may be anomalous re ec- re ection are well understood. tion candidates. However, such lakes could not be too deep since the signal would be too attenuated other- wise. Acknowledgements (f ) Snow covered crevasses/hollow caves/ice bridges: An ice-to-air boundary would have the cor- We are very grateful to Thomas Laepple for provid- rect properties for re ection without phase inversion. ing the B41 ice core data from Ref. [25]. Furthermore, However, fumarolic and volcanic ice caves do not we warmly acknowledge helpful discussions with Kumiko seem to be suciently common for the ANITA events. Azuma, Dmitry Chirkin, Francis Halzen, Stefan Ligten- Crevasses are common in regions of fast ow, but not berg, Henning Loewe, and David Saltzberg. The work are not common in the middle of the ice sheet where of I.M.S. is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy the ANITA events are observed. under the award number DE-SC0019163. The work of 5 A.K. was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technol- Grant No. DE-SC0009937, and by the World Premier ogy, under a contract with the National Aeronautics International Research Center Initiative (WPI), MEXT, and Space Administration. P.K.M. is supported by the Japan. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Netherlands Earth System Science Centre (NESSC). [1] ANITA collaboration, P. W. 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High Energy Physics - PhenomenologyarXiv (Cornell University)

Published: May 7, 2019

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