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Force-feedback improves performance for steering and combined steering-targeting tasks

Force-feedback improves performance for steering and combined steering-targeting tasks CHI 2 0 0 0 * 1-6 APRIL 2 0 0 0 Papers Force-Feedback Improves Performance For Steering and Combined Steering-Targeting Tasks Jack Tigh Dennerlein David B. Martin Christopher Hasser Harvard University 665 Huntington Ave Boston, MA 02115 +1 617-432-2028 jax@hsph.harvard.edu ABSTRACT Harvard University & Dartmouth College Hanover, NH 03755 David.B.Martin@dartmouth.edu Stanford University & Immersion Corporation 2158 Paragon Drive San Jose, CA 95131 c.hasser@ieee.org The introduction of a force-feedback mouse, which provides high fidelity tactile cues via force output, may represent a long-awaited technological breakthrough in pointing device designs. However, there have been few studies examining the benefits of force-feedback for the desktop computer human interface. Ten adults performed eighty steering tasks, where the participants moved the cursor through a small tunnel with varying indices of difficulty using a conventional and force-feedback mouse. For the force-feedback condition, the mouse displayed force that pulled the cursor to the center of the tunnel. The tasks required both horizontal and vertical screen movements of the cursor. Movement times were on average 52 percent faster during the force-feedback condition when compared to the conventional mouse. Furthermore, for the conventional mouse vertical movements required more time to complete than horizontal screen movements. Another http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Force-feedback improves performance for steering and combined steering-targeting tasks

Association for Computing Machinery — Apr 1, 2000

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Datasource
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by ACM Inc.
ISBN
1-58113-216-6
doi
10.1145/332040.332469
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHI 2 0 0 0 * 1-6 APRIL 2 0 0 0 Papers Force-Feedback Improves Performance For Steering and Combined Steering-Targeting Tasks Jack Tigh Dennerlein David B. Martin Christopher Hasser Harvard University 665 Huntington Ave Boston, MA 02115 +1 617-432-2028 jax@hsph.harvard.edu ABSTRACT Harvard University & Dartmouth College Hanover, NH 03755 David.B.Martin@dartmouth.edu Stanford University & Immersion Corporation 2158 Paragon Drive San Jose, CA 95131 c.hasser@ieee.org The introduction of a force-feedback mouse, which provides high fidelity tactile cues via force output, may represent a long-awaited technological breakthrough in pointing device designs. However, there have been few studies examining the benefits of force-feedback for the desktop computer human interface. Ten adults performed eighty steering tasks, where the participants moved the cursor through a small tunnel with varying indices of difficulty using a conventional and force-feedback mouse. For the force-feedback condition, the mouse displayed force that pulled the cursor to the center of the tunnel. The tasks required both horizontal and vertical screen movements of the cursor. Movement times were on average 52 percent faster during the force-feedback condition when compared to the conventional mouse. Furthermore, for the conventional mouse vertical movements required more time to complete than horizontal screen movements. Another

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