Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

It could be better. It could be much worse: Understanding Accessibility in User Experience Practice with Implications for Industry and Education

It could be better. It could be much worse: Understanding Accessibility in User Experience... While accessibility is acknowledged as a crucial component in design, many technologies remain inaccessible for people with disabilities. As part of a study to better understand UX practice to inform pedagogy, we analyzed 58 interview sessions that included 65 senior user experience (UX) professionals and asked them “How do you consider accessibility in your work?” Using transitivity analysis from critical discourse analysis, our findings provide insight into the disparate practices of individuals and organizations. Key findings include the growing role of design systems to structurally address accessibility and the range of organizational strategies, including dedicated teams. We also found that the categories of accessibility consideration were somewhat superficial and largely focused on vision-related challenges. Additionally, our findings support previous work that many practitioners did not feel their formal education adequately prepared them to address accessibility. We conclude with implications for education and industry, namely, the importance of implementing and teaching design systems in human-computer interaction and computer-science programs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing (TACCESS) Association for Computing Machinery

It could be better. It could be much worse: Understanding Accessibility in User Experience Practice with Implications for Industry and Education

Loading next page...
 
/lp/association-for-computing-machinery/it-could-be-better-it-could-be-much-worse-understanding-accessibility-LrSJvwtTQV

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2023 Copyright held by the owner/author(s). Publication rights licensed to ACM.
ISSN
1936-7228
eISSN
1936-7236
DOI
10.1145/3575662
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While accessibility is acknowledged as a crucial component in design, many technologies remain inaccessible for people with disabilities. As part of a study to better understand UX practice to inform pedagogy, we analyzed 58 interview sessions that included 65 senior user experience (UX) professionals and asked them “How do you consider accessibility in your work?” Using transitivity analysis from critical discourse analysis, our findings provide insight into the disparate practices of individuals and organizations. Key findings include the growing role of design systems to structurally address accessibility and the range of organizational strategies, including dedicated teams. We also found that the categories of accessibility consideration were somewhat superficial and largely focused on vision-related challenges. Additionally, our findings support previous work that many practitioners did not feel their formal education adequately prepared them to address accessibility. We conclude with implications for education and industry, namely, the importance of implementing and teaching design systems in human-computer interaction and computer-science programs.

Journal

ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing (TACCESS)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Mar 28, 2023

Keywords: Accessibility

There are no references for this article.