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Pithos

Pithos There has been significant research effort into peer-to-peer (P2P) massively multi-user virtual environments (MMVEs). A number of architectures have been proposed to implement the P2P approach; however, the development of fully distributed MMVEs has met with a number of challenges. In this work, we address one of the key remaining challenges of state consistency and persistency in P2P MMVEs. Having reviewed state management and persistency architectures currently receiving research attention, we have identified deficiencies such as lack of load balancing, responsiveness, and scalability. To address these deficiencies, we present Pithosa reliable, responsive, secure, load-balanced, and scalable distributed storage system, suited to P2P MMVEs. Pithos is designed specifically for P2P MMVEs, and we show that it improves the reliability and responsiveness of storage architectures as compared to existing P2P state persistency architectures. Pithos is implemented as an OverSim simulation running on the OMNeT++ network simulation framework. It is evaluated using up to 10,400 peers, with realistic latency profiles, with up to 15.8 million storage and retrieval requests that are generated to store a total of 2.4 million objects. Each peer in Pithos uses a maximum of 1,950Bps bandwidth to achieve 99.98% storage reliability, while the most reliable overlay storage configuration tested only achieved 93.65% reliability, using 2,182Bps bandwidth. Pithos is also more responsive than overlay storage, with an average responsiveness of 0.192s, compared with the average overlay responsiveness of 1.4s when retrieving objects from storage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMM) Association for Computing Machinery

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References (74)

Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 ACM
ISSN
1551-6857
eISSN
1551-6865
DOI
10.1145/3105577
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There has been significant research effort into peer-to-peer (P2P) massively multi-user virtual environments (MMVEs). A number of architectures have been proposed to implement the P2P approach; however, the development of fully distributed MMVEs has met with a number of challenges. In this work, we address one of the key remaining challenges of state consistency and persistency in P2P MMVEs. Having reviewed state management and persistency architectures currently receiving research attention, we have identified deficiencies such as lack of load balancing, responsiveness, and scalability. To address these deficiencies, we present Pithosa reliable, responsive, secure, load-balanced, and scalable distributed storage system, suited to P2P MMVEs. Pithos is designed specifically for P2P MMVEs, and we show that it improves the reliability and responsiveness of storage architectures as compared to existing P2P state persistency architectures. Pithos is implemented as an OverSim simulation running on the OMNeT++ network simulation framework. It is evaluated using up to 10,400 peers, with realistic latency profiles, with up to 15.8 million storage and retrieval requests that are generated to store a total of 2.4 million objects. Each peer in Pithos uses a maximum of 1,950Bps bandwidth to achieve 99.98% storage reliability, while the most reliable overlay storage configuration tested only achieved 93.65% reliability, using 2,182Bps bandwidth. Pithos is also more responsive than overlay storage, with an average responsiveness of 0.192s, compared with the average overlay responsiveness of 1.4s when retrieving objects from storage.

Journal

ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMM)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Jul 12, 2017

Keywords: Massive multiplayer virtual environments

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