Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

When Men Become Orthodox in Israel: Druze-Style

When Men Become Orthodox in Israel: Druze-Style Novitiates to the study of Middle Eastern faiths ‘know’ that much of the Druze religion is—paradoxically—unknowable: Druze sacred texts are regarded as closely guarded secrets. Not even Druze themselves are granted access to these scriptures if they have not taken a vow to become normatively observant. However, the decision to become Orthodox is not subject to similar confidentiality. Interviews with over a dozen religious Druze men in Israel on their decisions for becoming uqqal (religious; ‘Orthodox’) elicited a variety of responses. Their decisions were inflected, in part, by their experiences as Israelis, including several years of military service and exposure to the wider Jewish society. One's identity as an Orthodox Druze is different in a Jewish state compared to a Muslim state: no religion is a nation unto itself. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anthropology of the Middle East Berghahn Books

When Men Become Orthodox in Israel: Druze-Style

Anthropology of the Middle East , Volume 17 (2) – Dec 1, 2022
19 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/berghahn-books/when-men-become-orthodox-in-israel-druze-style-40Ra9z2arR

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© 2022 Berghahn Books
ISSN
1746-0719
eISSN
1746-0727
DOI
10.3167/ame.2022.170209
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Novitiates to the study of Middle Eastern faiths ‘know’ that much of the Druze religion is—paradoxically—unknowable: Druze sacred texts are regarded as closely guarded secrets. Not even Druze themselves are granted access to these scriptures if they have not taken a vow to become normatively observant. However, the decision to become Orthodox is not subject to similar confidentiality. Interviews with over a dozen religious Druze men in Israel on their decisions for becoming uqqal (religious; ‘Orthodox’) elicited a variety of responses. Their decisions were inflected, in part, by their experiences as Israelis, including several years of military service and exposure to the wider Jewish society. One's identity as an Orthodox Druze is different in a Jewish state compared to a Muslim state: no religion is a nation unto itself.

Journal

Anthropology of the Middle EastBerghahn Books

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Druze; ethno-religion; Israel(i); national identity; reincarnation; religiosity

References