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The Case For Sovereignty; Why the World Should Welcome American Independence

The Case For Sovereignty; Why the World Should Welcome American Independence I NTERNATIONAL O RGANIZATIONS L AW R EVIEW www.brill.nl/iolr © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/157237307X223666 Book Review Jeremy Rabkin, The Case For Sovereignty; Why the World Should Welcome American Independence , (Washington D.C., American Enterprise Institute, 2004) 255pp., ISBN 084474183-3 Jeremy Rabkin’s book The Case for Sovereignty; Why the World Should Welcome Ameri- can Independence attempts to juxtapose American sovereignty against international law and international governing bodies, such as the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the United Nations, as completely opposing and mutually exclusive concepts. The use of the word “independence” in his subtitle is meant as complete independence from any sort of third-party governance, jurisdiction, or, really, interference of any kind. He goes about this arduous task of severing the United States from the rest of the world through a variety of history lessons, cost-benefit analyses, determination of global bodies’ effectiveness and the ensuing impact on American interests, and outright bashing of Europe, various European states, and European history’s take on constitutions, law, and globalization. The cover flaps provide us with summarizing statements regarding the book that will soon prove to be ironic. The first sentence in the front flap claims that the book “goes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Organizations Law Review Brill

The Case For Sovereignty; Why the World Should Welcome American Independence

International Organizations Law Review , Volume 4 (1): 157 – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3739
eISSN
1572-3747
DOI
10.1163/157237307X223666
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I NTERNATIONAL O RGANIZATIONS L AW R EVIEW www.brill.nl/iolr © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2007 DOI: 10.1163/157237307X223666 Book Review Jeremy Rabkin, The Case For Sovereignty; Why the World Should Welcome American Independence , (Washington D.C., American Enterprise Institute, 2004) 255pp., ISBN 084474183-3 Jeremy Rabkin’s book The Case for Sovereignty; Why the World Should Welcome Ameri- can Independence attempts to juxtapose American sovereignty against international law and international governing bodies, such as the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the United Nations, as completely opposing and mutually exclusive concepts. The use of the word “independence” in his subtitle is meant as complete independence from any sort of third-party governance, jurisdiction, or, really, interference of any kind. He goes about this arduous task of severing the United States from the rest of the world through a variety of history lessons, cost-benefit analyses, determination of global bodies’ effectiveness and the ensuing impact on American interests, and outright bashing of Europe, various European states, and European history’s take on constitutions, law, and globalization. The cover flaps provide us with summarizing statements regarding the book that will soon prove to be ironic. The first sentence in the front flap claims that the book “goes

Journal

International Organizations Law ReviewBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.