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A glossary for social epidemiology

A glossary for social epidemiology J Epidemiol Community Health 2001;55:693–700 693 Glossary N Krieger Why “social epidemiology”? Is not all epidemi- Whether these biological expressions of social ology, after all, “social” epidemiology? In so far inequality are interpreted as expressions of as people are simultaneously social and biologi- innate versus imposed, or individual versus cal organisms, is any biological process ever societal, characteristics in part is shaped by the expressed devoid of social context?—or any very social inequalities patterning population social process ever unmediated by the corporal health. The construct of “biological expres- reality of our profoundly generative and mortal sions of social inequality” thus stands in bodies? Yet, despite the seeming truism that contrast with biologically deterministic formu- social as well as biological processes inherently lations that cast biological processes and traits shape population health—a truism recognised tautologically invoked to define membership in even in the founding days of epidemiology as a subordinate versus dominant groups (for scientific discipline in the early 19th century— example, skin colour or biological sex) as not all epidemiology is “social epidemiol- explanations for social inequalities in health. ogy”. Instead, “social epidemiology” (which first attained its name as such in English in 1950 ) is distinguished by its http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health British Medical Journal

A glossary for social epidemiology

Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health , Volume 55 (10) – Oct 1, 2001

A glossary for social epidemiology

Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health , Volume 55 (10) – Oct 1, 2001

Abstract

J Epidemiol Community Health 2001;55:693–700 693 Glossary N Krieger Why “social epidemiology”? Is not all epidemi- Whether these biological expressions of social ology, after all, “social” epidemiology? In so far inequality are interpreted as expressions of as people are simultaneously social and biologi- innate versus imposed, or individual versus cal organisms, is any biological process ever societal, characteristics in part is shaped by the expressed devoid of social context?—or any very social inequalities patterning population social process ever unmediated by the corporal health. The construct of “biological expres- reality of our profoundly generative and mortal sions of social inequality” thus stands in bodies? Yet, despite the seeming truism that contrast with biologically deterministic formu- social as well as biological processes inherently lations that cast biological processes and traits shape population health—a truism recognised tautologically invoked to define membership in even in the founding days of epidemiology as a subordinate versus dominant groups (for scientific discipline in the early 19th century— example, skin colour or biological sex) as not all epidemiology is “social epidemiol- explanations for social inequalities in health. ogy”. Instead, “social epidemiology” (which first attained its name as such in English in 1950 ) is distinguished by its

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References (79)

Publisher
British Medical Journal
Copyright
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
ISSN
0143-005X
eISSN
1470-2738
DOI
10.1136/jech.55.10.693
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J Epidemiol Community Health 2001;55:693–700 693 Glossary N Krieger Why “social epidemiology”? Is not all epidemi- Whether these biological expressions of social ology, after all, “social” epidemiology? In so far inequality are interpreted as expressions of as people are simultaneously social and biologi- innate versus imposed, or individual versus cal organisms, is any biological process ever societal, characteristics in part is shaped by the expressed devoid of social context?—or any very social inequalities patterning population social process ever unmediated by the corporal health. The construct of “biological expres- reality of our profoundly generative and mortal sions of social inequality” thus stands in bodies? Yet, despite the seeming truism that contrast with biologically deterministic formu- social as well as biological processes inherently lations that cast biological processes and traits shape population health—a truism recognised tautologically invoked to define membership in even in the founding days of epidemiology as a subordinate versus dominant groups (for scientific discipline in the early 19th century— example, skin colour or biological sex) as not all epidemiology is “social epidemiol- explanations for social inequalities in health. ogy”. Instead, “social epidemiology” (which first attained its name as such in English in 1950 ) is distinguished by its

Journal

Journal of Epidemiology & Community HealthBritish Medical Journal

Published: Oct 1, 2001

Keywords: discrimination ecosocial gender racism

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